APA releases new journal article reporting standards

“Brian Nosek, PhD, co-founder and director of the Center for Open Science, welcomed the new standards. “Achieving the ideals of transparency in science requires knowing what one needs to be transparent about,” he said. “These updated standards will improve readers’ understanding of what happened in the research. This will improve both the accuracy of interpretation of the existing evidence, and the ability to replicate and extend the findings to improve understanding.” APA has partnered with the Center for Open Science to advance open science practices in psychological research through open science badges on articles, a data repository for APA published articles and designating the COS’ PsyArXiv as the preferred preprint server for APA titles….”

Enough is enough. Academics must stand up against this bullshit | The Spinoff

“A growing number of scientists are reporting their methods and data online and in real time, rather than only publishing their most exciting results behind a paywall in some academic journal. It’s called open science, but is nowhere near being the accepted way to carry out scientific research. This has to change. Now. Maintaining public trust in science depends on it….”

Science Journals: editorial policies | Science | AAAS

“The Science Journals support the Transparency and Openness Promotion (TOP) guidelines to raise the quality of research published in Science and to increase transparency regarding the evidence on which conclusions are based….All data used in the analysis must be available to any researcher for purposes of reproducing or extending the analysis. Data must be available in the paper, deposited in a community special-purpose repository, accessible via a general-purpose repository such as Dryad, or otherwise openly available….”

Is the Center for Open Science a Viable Alternative for Elsevier? – Enago Academy

“Data management has become an increasingly discussed topic among the academic community. Managing data is an element of open science, which has proven to increase dissemination of research and citations for journal articles. Open science increases public access to academic articles, mostly through preprint repositories. Indeed, according to this study, open access (OA) articles are associated with a 36-172% increase in citations compared to non-OA articles. Publishers such as Elsevier have acquired preprint repositories to increase the dissemination of academic research.”

Stencila

“The office suite for reproducible research

The calls for research to be transparent and reproducible have never been louder. But today’s tools for reproducible research can be intimidating – especially if you’re not a coder. We’re building software for reproducible research with the intuitive, visual interfaces that you and your colleagues are used to….”

Understanding Open Science: Definitions and framework

Understanding Open Science: Definitions and framework

  1. 1. Understanding Open Science: Definitions and framework Dr. Nancy Pontika Open Access Aggregation Officer CORE Twitter: @nancypontika
  2. 2. What is Open Science
  3. 3. Research Lifecycle: as simple as it gets Idea Methodology Data Collection Analysis Publish
  4. 4. Idea Methodology Data Collection Analysis Publish Journal article, Dissertation, Book, Source Code, etc. Experiments, Interviews, Observations, etc. Numbers, Code, Text, Images, sound records, etc. Statistics, processes, analysis, documentation, etc. Research Lifecycle: focus on the steps”

Emory Libraries Blog | Put a badge on it: incentives for data sharing and reproducibility

“How do you encourage researchers to share the data underlying their publications? The journal Psychological Science introduced a digital badge system in 2014 to signify when authors make the data and related materials accompanying their articles openly available. Criteria to earn the Open Data badge include (1) sharing data via a publicly accessible repository with a persistent identifier, such as a DOI, (2) assigning an open license, such as CC-BY or CC0, allowing reuse and credit to the data producer, and (3) providing enough documentation that another researcher could reproduce the reported results (Badges to Acknowledge Open Practices project on the Open Science Framework)….”

Addgene: Homepage

“Addgene is a global, nonprofit repository that was created to help scientists share plasmids. Plasmids are DNA-based research reagents commonly used in the life sciences. When scientists publish research papers, they deposit their associated plasmids at Addgene. Then, when other scientists read the publication, they have easy access to the plasmids needed to conduct future experiments. Before Addgene, scientists were tasked with repeatedly shipping plasmids to each new requesting scientist. Now, scientists ship their plasmids to Addgene once, and we take care of the quality control, MTA compliance, shipping, and record-keeping.

For scientists looking to use plasmids, Addgene provides a searchable database of high-quality plasmids, pooled libraries, and plasmid kits, available at affordable prices. All plasmids in Addgene’s repository are sequenced for quality control purposes and tracked with barcodes from the time they arrive at our facility until they are packed for shipment. Scientists can request plasmids through Addgene’s online ordering system. As of 2016, Addgene also provides ready-to-use AAV and lentivirus preparations of commonly requested plasmids as a service to scientists….”

rOpenSci – Open Tools for Open Science

“At rOpenSci we are creating packages that allow access to data repositories through the R statistical programming environment that is already a familiar part of the workflow of many scientists. Our tools not only facilitate drawing data into an environment where it can readily be manipulated, but also one in which those analyses and methods can be easily shared, replicated, and extended by other researchers….We develop open source R packages that provide programmatic access to a variety of scientific data, full-text of journal articles, and repositories that provide real-time metrics of scholarly impact. …Use our packages to acquire data (both your own and from various data sources), analyze it, add in your narrative, and generate a final publication in any one of widely used formats such as Word, PDF, or LaTeX. Combine our tools with the rich ecosystem of existing R packages….”

mixtrak — Open scientific methods: my experience with protocols.io

“In the continuing quest to make my PhD research comply with the ideals of open science, I’m uploading my protocols to protocols.io. This will create a detailed, publicly available, citable methods record (with a DOI!) for my research which aids with transparency, peer review, replication and re-use.”