mixtrak — Open scientific methods: my experience with protocols.io

“In the continuing quest to make my PhD research comply with the ideals of open science, I’m uploading my protocols to protocols.io. This will create a detailed, publicly available, citable methods record (with a DOI!) for my research which aids with transparency, peer review, replication and re-use.”

Open Science Framework for Research Workflows October 18, 2017 | UCLA Library Events

“Wednesday, Oct 18, 2017 – 9:00am to 12:00pm

There are many actions researchers can take to increase the openness and reproducibility of their work. Please join us for a workshop, hosted by the Center for Open Science, to learn easy, practical steps researchers can take to increase the reproducibility of their work. The workshop will be hands-on. Using example studies, attendees will actively participate in creating a reproducible project from start to finish.

Topics covered: 

  • Project documentation
  • Version control
  • Pre-Analysis plans
  • Open source tools like the Center for Open Science’s Open Science Framework to easily implement these concepts in a scientific workflow.”

Workshop on Reproducible Research Practices and the Open Science Framework | Data Management Services

“Please join us for a workshop, hosted by the Center for Open Science and JHU Data Management Services, to learn easy, practical steps researchers can take to increase the reproducibility of their work.

The workshop will be hands-on. (Please bring a laptop if possible.) Using an example study, attendees will actively participate in creating a reproducible project from start to finish.

Topics covered include:

  • Project documentation
  • Version control
  • Pre-analysis plans
  • Open source tools: in this specific instance, the Open Science Framework to easily implement these concepts in one easily accessible space”

Clinical trials revolution could change the future of medical research | Science | The Guardian

“In tumultuous times, it is easy to miss the fact that science is undergoing a quiet revolution. For several years now, concerns have been peaking in biomedicine about the reliability of published research – that the results of too many studies cannot be reproduced when the methods are repeated. Alongside growing discontent, the scientific community has answered by driving forward a raft of open science reforms. From initiatives to making research data publicly available, to ensuring that all published research can be read by the public, the aim of these reforms is simple: to make science more credible and accessible, for the benefit of other scientists and the public who fund scientific research.”

BEAT: An Open-Science Web Platform

“With the increased interest in computational sciences, machine learning (ML), pattern recognition (PR) and big data, governmental agencies, academia and manufacturers are overwhelmed by the constant influx of new algorithms and techniques promising improved performance, generalization and robustness. Sadly, result reproducibility is often an overlooked feature accompanying original research publications, competitions and benchmark evaluations. The main reasons behind such a gap arise from natural complications in research and development in this area: the distribution of data may be a sensitive issue; software frameworks are difficult to install and maintain; Test protocols may involve a potentially large set of intricate steps which are difficult to handle. To bridge this gap, we built an open platform for research in computational sciences related to pattern recognition and machine learning, to help on the development, reproducibility and certification of results obtained in the field. By making use of such a system, academic, governmental or industrial organizations enable users to easily and socially develop processing toolchains, re-use data, algorithms, workflows and compare results from distinct algorithms and/or parameterizations with minimal effort. This article presents such a platform and discusses some of its key features, uses and limitations. We overview a currently operational prototype and provide design insights.”

PsyArXiv Preprints | Suggestions to Advance Your Mission: An Open Letter to Dr. Shinobu Kitayama, Editor of JPSP:ASC

An open letter to the new editor-in-chief of Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: Attitudes and Social Cognition, urging the adoption of best practices for data sharing, reproducibility, and open science.

The State of OA: A large-scale analysis of the prevalence and impact of Open Access articles [PeerJ Preprints]

Despite growing interest in Open Access (OA) to scholarly literature, there is an unmet need for large-scale, up-to-date, and reproducible studies assessing the prevalence and characteristics of OA. We address this need using oaDOI, an open online service that determines OA status for 67 million articles.

 

Open Research Central

“Open Research Central is a portal through which research in any field can be submitted for formal publication on one of the open research publishing platforms.

These platforms are currently operated by F1000 and use a model of immediate publication followed by transparent invited peer review, and require the inclusion of all supporting data (see here for more details of the model).

This model has been running on F1000Research since its inception in 2013. It is also used on Wellcome Open Research (launched November 2016) for Wellcome grant holders, and will also be used on the upcoming Gates Open Research for Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grant holders and UCL Child Health Open Research for all research groups at UCL focusing on child health. See the respective platforms for details of the current model, as well as author guidelines and policies.

The model continues to evolve through ongoing consultation with a wide variety of stakeholders, including numerous researchers across scientific disciplines, research funders, institutions, policy makers, and others.

While F1000 is currently maintaining Open Research Central and the publishing platforms, our longer-term plan is to transition Open Research Central to being owned and governed by the international research community with broad representation across research funding agencies, research institutions, and researchers themselves. We will assemble a governing board shortly to start this process….”

ORC – Open Research Central: ‘repulsive and malevolent’ or ‘lover of rebellion and freedom’ | F1000 Blogs

“Our ORC is Open Research Central, it is a portal through which research in any field can be submitted for formal publication on one of the open research publishing platforms that we provide for funders and institutes.

We envision Open Research Central as a portal that will ultimately free researchers from the prisons of academic journals and become the default way in all research areas to formally publish their findings. It will be underpinned by several key principles: immediate publication; open data; open, transparent post publication peer review; and fully open access to all. If we succeed we will bring about a revolution in how academic researchers share their findings. A revolution with far reaching consequences that will significantly benefit not only the way research progresses but also our society in general, so dependent on the research that the sciences, engineering and humanities produce.”

A manifesto for reproducible science | Nature Human Behaviour

Improving the quality and transparency in the reporting of research is necessary to address this. The Transparency and Openness Promotion (TOP) guidelines offer standards as a basis for journals and funders to incentivize or require greater transparency in planning and reporting of research….The TOP guidelines54,65 promote open practices, while an increasing number of journals and funders require open practices (for example, open data), with some offering their researchers free, immediate open-access publication with transparent post-publication peer review (for example, the Wellcome Trust, with the launch of Wellcome Open Research). Policies to promote open science can include reporting guidelines or specific disclosure statements (see Box 6). At the same time, commercial and non-profit organizations are building new infrastructure such as the Open Science Framework to make transparency easy and desirable for researchers…..”