The Rise of Open Science in Psychology, a Preliminary Report

Open science is on the rise. Across disciplines, there are increasing rates of sharing data, making available underlying materials and protocols, and preregistering studies and analysis plans.  Hundreds of services have emerged to support open science behaviors at every stage of the research lifecycle.  But, what proportion of the research community is practicing open science? Where is penetration of these behaviors strongest and weakest?  Answers to these questions are important for evaluating progress in culture reform and for strategic planning of where to invest resources next.  

 

The hardest part of getting meaningful answers to these questions is quantifying the population that is NOT doing the behaviors.  For example, in a recent post, Nici Pfeiffer summarized the accelerating growth of OSF users on the occasion of hitting 150,000 registered users.  That number and non-linear growth suggests cultural movement associated with this one service, but how much movement?…”

Open Science, Open Source and R

Even when the authors sent you their data, it often didn’t help that much. One of the most common problems was that when you re-analysed their data, you ended up with different answers to it! This turned out to be quite common, because most descriptions of data analyses provided in journal articles are incomplete and ambiguous. What you really needed was the original authors’ source code—an unambiguous and complete record of every data processing step they took, from the raw data files, to the graphs and statistics in the final report….

There’s still one major problem to solve. Publishing your scientific source code is essential for open science, but it’s not enough. For fully open science, you also need the platforms on which that code runs to be open. Without open platforms, the future usability of open-source code is at risk….

The Replication Crisis might have been one of the best things ever to happen to psychology. It became a catalyst for much-needed change to our scientific processes….”

Scholarly Communication and Open Access in Psychology: Current Considerations for Researchers

Abstract:  Scholarly communication and open access practices in psychological science are rapidly evolving. However, most published works that focus on scholarly communication issues do not target the specific discipline, and instead take a more “one size fits all” approach. When it comes to scholarly communication, practices and traditions vary greatly across the disciplines. It is important to look at issues such as open access (of all types), reproducibility, research data management, citation metrics, the emergence of preprint options, the evolution of new peer review models, coauthorship conventions, and use of scholarly networking sites such as ResearchGate and Academia.edu from a disciplinary perspective. Important issues in scholarly publishing for psychology include uptake of authors’ use of open access megajournals, how open science is represented in psychology journals, challenges of interdisciplinarity, and how authors avail themselves of green and gold open access strategies. This overview presents a discipline-focused treatment of selected scholarly communication topics that will allow psychology researchers and others to get up to speed on this expansive topic. Further study into researcher behavior in terms of scholarly communication in psychology would create more understanding of existing culture as well as provide early career researchers with a more effective roadmap to the current landscape. As no other single work provides a study of scholarly communication and open access in psychology, this work aims to partially fill that niche.

What Is “Open Science?” Why the Future of Psychedelic Science Depends on It | Inverse

“There is a growing research literature suggesting psychedelics hold incredible promise for treating mental health ailments ranging from depression and anxiety to PTSD. But how do we know for sure?

The way forward for psychedelics is through “open science.” Researchers should pre-register their plans and share their data, as we have in our own research….”

Hiring Policy at the LMU Psychology Department: Better have some open science track record

“Our department embraces the values of open science and strives for replicable and reproducible research. For this goal we support transparent research with open data, open materials, and study pre-registration. Candidates are asked to describe in what way they already pursued and plan to pursue these goals.”

How green is our valley?: five-year study of selected LIS journals from Taylor & Francis for green deposit of articles

Abstract:  This study reviews content from five different library and information science journals: Behavioral & Social Sciences Librarian, Collection Management, College & Undergraduate Libraries, Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship and Journal of Library Administration over a five-year period from 2012–2016 to investigate the green deposit rate. Starting in 2011, Taylor & Francis, the publisher of these journals, waived the green deposit embargo for library and information science, heritage and archival content, which allows for immediate deposit of articles in these fields. The review looks at research articles and standing columns over the five years from these five journals to see if any articles were retrieved using the OA Button or through institutional repositories. Results indicate that less than a quarter of writers have chosen to make a green deposit of their articles in local or subject repositories. The discussion outlines some best practices to be undertaken by librarians, editors and Taylor & Francis to make this program more successful.

APA Creates Open Science and Methodology Chair to Deepen Commitment to Data Sharing, Transparency in Science

“The American Psychological Association has created an open science and methodology chair to work with its authors, reviewers, editors and publications board to understand and develop best practices for the evolving landscape of open science in psychological research. “APA is committed to promoting transparency and sound practice in psychological research,” said Rose Sokol-Chang, PhD, APA’s journals publisher. “We are enthusiastic about offering the psychology community another resource to bolster this work.” APA’s Publications and Communications Board approved the post and will issue an open call to recruit for it in early summer. The chair will initially work with a committee to help refine and extend the P&C Board policy for APA journals related to open science practices. APA Journals is committed to publishing transparent research, publishing replications and offering resources such as its Journal Article Reporting Standards for quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods research design; open science badges; and an APA Journals data repository, in conjunction with the Center for Open Science. “APA recognizes the importance of sharing data to aid secondary discovery, increase efficiency in research discoveries and improve reproducibility in science,” said Sokol-Chang. Qualifications for the post are experience in open science practices, including data sharing, reproducibility and preregistration; editorial experience and familiarity with APA journals policy; experience with data management, research methodology and clinical trials; and having served on an institutional review board. Interested applicants can read more about the position online or by email. APA is the world’s largest nonprofit publisher of psychological science, setting standards for scholarship in the field. APA Publishing produces journals, books, videos, databases and educational products for researchers, practitioners, educators, students and the public. “

Frankl: An open science platform

“Frankl is a blockchain platform and tokenised economy to promote, facilitate, and incentivise the practice of open science. The initial focus of Frankl is cognitive assessment – an area of our expertise, and a research domain that faces particular challenges that are amenable to blockchain solutions.

In Phase I, Frankl will develop app-based cognitive assessments that streamline test administration and improve accessibility for children and adults with physical or cognitive disabilities. Apps will interface with blockchain-based data storage, facilitating data sharing for clinical and research purposes while maintaining privacy of individuals via encryption. Access to the Frankl suite of apps will be via micropayments in Frankl tokens.

In Phase II, Frankl will release the source code for the apps, enabling researchers, clinicians, and independent app developers to build their own cognitive assessment apps on the Frankl platform. In this way, Frankl will create a marketplace to incentivise (via Frankl tokens) the development of new and better cognitive assessments, simultaneously promoting open science and disrupting the forecast (by 2021) USD 8 billion global market for cognitive assessment and training.

This whitepaper outlines the technical specifications for the Frankl platform, the practical path to its creation, and exemplar applications including our first use case – a cognitive assessment specifically designed for autistic children. We provide details of the Frankl token economy and participation, and sketch out our long term vision for the development of Frankl as an interface whereby blockchain technologies facilitate the widespread adoption of open science practices. …”