Accelerating open science in physics | Research Information

“Some argue there is enough money in the system to afford a transition to open access. Whether this is the case or not, there is no current solution or global plan in place to adjust the allocation and flow of funding so it resides at the levels exactly commensurate to where research is produced. These are not intractable challenges. But they require global consensus on the goal of open science, coordinated action to build the infrastructure, and incentives to create lasting change. This will take time….

Although Covid-19 might have reinforced the value of open science, its benefits are well understood by many in the physics community, and we are a long-standing proponent. But there is still much work for all involved if we are to transition to a fully and sustainably open landscape in physics and beyond.

To that end, we will maintain an open dialogue with the physical scientists and scientific organisations we serve and continue to seek more insight into what’s specifically important to them. Over the coming year we will engage in a series of projects to speak to the global physical science community so we can contribute to more open science – more ‘open physics’ – and we look forward to reporting back.”

Accelerating open science in physics | Research Information

“Some argue there is enough money in the system to afford a transition to open access. Whether this is the case or not, there is no current solution or global plan in place to adjust the allocation and flow of funding so it resides at the levels exactly commensurate to where research is produced. These are not intractable challenges. But they require global consensus on the goal of open science, coordinated action to build the infrastructure, and incentives to create lasting change. This will take time….

Although Covid-19 might have reinforced the value of open science, its benefits are well understood by many in the physics community, and we are a long-standing proponent. But there is still much work for all involved if we are to transition to a fully and sustainably open landscape in physics and beyond.

To that end, we will maintain an open dialogue with the physical scientists and scientific organisations we serve and continue to seek more insight into what’s specifically important to them. Over the coming year we will engage in a series of projects to speak to the global physical science community so we can contribute to more open science – more ‘open physics’ – and we look forward to reporting back.”

Being published successfully or getting arXived? The importance of social capital and interdisciplinary collaboration for getting printed in a high impact journal in Physics

Abstract:  The structure of collaboration is known to be of great importance for the success of scientific endeavors. In particular, various types of social capital employed in co-authored work and projects bridging disciplinary boundaries have attracted researchers’ interest. Almost all previous studies, however, use samples with an inherent survivor bias, i.e., they focus on papers that have already been published. In contrast, our article examines the chances for getting a working paper published by using a unique dataset of 245,000 papers uploaded to arXiv. ArXiv is a popular preprint platform in Physics which allows us to construct a co-authorship network from which we can derive different types of social capital and interdisciplinary teamwork. To emphasize the ‘normal case’ of community-specific standards of excellence, we assess publications in Physics’ high impact journals as success. Utilizing multilevel event history models, our results reveal that already a moderate number of persistent collaborations spanning at least two years is the most important social antecedent of getting a manuscript published successfully. In contrast, inter- and subdisciplinary collaborations decrease the probability of publishing in an eminent journal in Physics, which can only partially be mitigated by scientists’ social capital.

 

Remote Access to Scitation.org During COVID-19 Pandemic

“To support global research during the COVID-19 pandemic, AIP Publishing is temporarily making content freely available to scientists and students who register on Scitation.org. We also have several solutions for remote access available for our institutional customers.

AIP Publishing is committed to providing global researchers in the physical sciences with the information, service and support they need to work effectively during this extended stay-at-home period. For additional support, please contact our customer service team….”

Continuing a Publishing Dialogue on Open Science – AIP Publishing LLC

“Some key points we asked OSTP to consider include:

To accelerate open science, researchers need to be incentivized to publish open access and to share their data. Changes to the academic assessment system may be required.
Publishers make significant investments in validating research through peer review and making it discoverable and available in perpetuity. Focusing on making the peer-reviewed manuscript publicly accessible unreasonably ignores the intellectual property and investment the publisher has made into the peer-reviewed author accepted manuscript and the final published version of record (VOR).
Preprints (such as those on the arXiv preprint server) provide immediate access to research results while supporting peer-reviewed journals to fulfill their role of registration, certification, dissemination, and preservation. We encourage OSTP to consider asking Federal agencies to require the deposition of preprints of federally funded research to an appropriate repository as an alternative to making the VOR open without an embargo.
There is a role for publishers and scholarly societies to work with funders to develop standards for data and code, and to develop interoperable systems and processes for storing, sharing and finding data.

The response from AIP Publishing can be read here….”

The open access financial model hinders the growth of medical physics research in low? and middle?income countries – Sarkar – – Medical Physics – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  Publishing papers in journals has long been an important way to exchange ideas and propagate knowledge. Recently, open access (OA) journals have gained growing attention as they provide greater accessibility to a wider guidance. However, the difference in the financial model between the OA journals and conventional subscription journals has brought many controversies. Some think that the OA financial model can facilitate the growth of medical physics in low? and middle?income countries (LMICs), while others have significant concerns about financial burdens that OA can bring to potential authors will hinder medical physics research in LMICs. This is the premise debated in this month’s Point/Counterpoint.

 

The open access financial model hinders the growth of medical physics research in low? and middle?income countries – Sarkar – – Medical Physics – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  Publishing papers in journals has long been an important way to exchange ideas and propagate knowledge. Recently, open access (OA) journals have gained growing attention as they provide greater accessibility to a wider guidance. However, the difference in the financial model between the OA journals and conventional subscription journals has brought many controversies. Some think that the OA financial model can facilitate the growth of medical physics in low? and middle?income countries (LMICs), while others have significant concerns about financial burdens that OA can bring to potential authors will hinder medical physics research in LMICs. This is the premise debated in this month’s Point/Counterpoint.

 

Journal research data sharing policies: a study of highly-cited journals in neuroscience, physics, and operations research | SpringerLink

“The practices for if and how scholarly journals instruct research data for published research to be shared is an area where a lot of changes have been happening as science policy moves towards facilitating open science, and subject-specific repositories and practices are established. This study provides an analysis of the research data sharing policies of highly-cited journals in the fields of neuroscience, physics, and operations research as of May 2019. For these 120 journals, 40 journals per subject category, a unified policy coding framework was developed to capture the most central elements of each policy, i.e. what, when, and where research data is instructed to be shared. The results affirm that considerable differences between research fields remain when it comes to policy existence, strength, and specificity. The findings revealed that one of the most important factors influencing the dimensions of what, where and when of research data policies was whether the journal’s scope included specific data types related to life sciences which have established methods of sharing through community-endorsed public repositories. The findings surface the future research potential of approaching policy analysis on the publisher-level as well as on the journal-level. The collected data and coding framework is provided as open data to facilitate future research and journal policy monitoring.