Some (serious) open access journals in mathematics | theHigherGeometer

“The following list was originally compiled by Thomas Sauvaget on his blog, Episodic Thoughts, now in stasis. He gave me permission to now host it here and update it as I see fit. If you feel that there is a respectable open access maths journal missing, preferably one that does not charge APCs, then let me know in the comments. Please search in the comments at Thomas’ post to see if it hadn’t already been suggested. I will edit this post as needed, and note that at present I haven’t gone through the list to double check all of these. I will place the checked list under an Creative Commons license at some point….”

arXiv Update – January 2019 – arXiv public wiki – Dashboard

“In 2018, the repository received 140,616 new submissions, a 14% increase from 2017. The subject distribution is evolving as Computer Science represented about 26% of overall submissions, and Math 24%. There were about 228 million downloads from all over the world. arXiv is truly a global resource, with almost 90% of supporting funds coming from sources other than Cornell and 70% of institutional use coming from countries other than the U.S….”

Open Up Resources

“Open Up Resources began as the K-12 OER Collaborative, a 13-state initiative to address quality gaps in the curriculum market.

We partnered with leading math and ELA experts to design the very best standards-aligned core programs.

We provide our superb curricula to districts at no cost by publishing them as Open Educational Resources.

When schools and districts adopt our free curricula, we provide opportunities to reinvest the savings in essential supports, from professional development to printed materials….”

What happens to journals that break away? | Filling a much-needed gap

Although it is still a relatively rare occurrence, several journal boards have broken away from large commercial publishers. A good list is at the Open Access Directory. These journals usually are required to change their name, because the previous publisher will not relinquish it. They are cut off from the enormous support provided by large commercial publishers (after all their subscription prices are so high, the money is surely being put back into developing better infrastructure, rather than, say enriching shareholders, giving inflated honoraria to editors or paying inefficient support staff). Thus one might expect that these journals would struggle.

I looked at the fortunes of the mathematics journals that have taken this route. Below I list the original title name, the approximate date of the breakaway, the new title and publisher, and citation impact measures taken from 2014 data at eigenfactor.org, and compare them to the results for the original journal….

It seems clear that the new journals are doing considerably better than the old ones overall. I wonder whether the idea often touted by radical leftist OA advocates that large commercial publishers don’t add much value could have a grain of truth in it.”

A new journal in combinatorics

Advances in Combinatorics is set up as a combinatorics journal for high-quality papers, principally in the less algebraic parts of combinatorics. It will be an arXiv overlay journal, so free to read, and it will not charge authors. Like its cousin Discrete Analysis (which has recently published its 50th paper) it will be run on the Scholastica platform. Its minimal costs are being paid for by the library at Queen’s University in Ontario, which is also providing administrative support

Investigating peer review overlay services

Today, a new journal in mathematics was launched by Timothy Gowers and Dan Kral. The journal, called ‘Advances in Combinatorics’, is an overlay journal, built entirely on articles contained in the arXiv repository. It is free to read and will not charge authors to publish. The relatively low costs of running the journal are being covered by Queen’s University Library in Ontario, Canada, which is also providing administrative support.

 

what are the top 3 journals you would like to see break away from their commercial publisher? (#7) · Issues · Publishing Reform / discussion · GitLab

Discussion thread: “what are the top 3 journals you would like to see break away from their commercial publisher?”.

How might we get to a new model of mathematical publishing? | Gowers’s Weblog

“I am more interested in whether mathematicians really need journal articles at all, now that we have the internet….I think that journals still have a vital role to play, even though the internet exists. However, like many people, I do not think it is at all obvious that they will continue to have a vital role to play, so I’d like to discuss two questions. 1. If we didn’t have journals, then what might we have instead? 2. How could the change from journals to whatever replaces them actually take place? …What I think could work is something like a cross between the arXiv, a social networking site, Amazon book reviews, and Mathoverflow….”

OER math curriculum from Open Up Resources aces a big test

“When EdReports reviews curricula, educators take notice. So Open Up Resources and Illustrative Mathematics — partners in developing an integrated math curriculum of open educational resources (OER) for grades 6-8 — were thrilled with the results of a review released Wednesday.”