EDP Sciences – Successful Subscribe to Open pilot paves the way for a ground-breaking roll out across the EDP Sciences maths portfolio

“EDP Sciences is pleased to announce an exciting development in its commitment to open access. Following the successful transition of Mathematical Modelling of Natural Phenomena (MMNP) to open access under the Subscribe to Open (S2O) pilot earlier this year, a further five maths journals will transition to open access under this model from January 2021. The journals are:

ESAIM: Control, Optimisation and Calculus of Variations (COCV)

ESAIM: Mathematical Modelling and Numerical Analysis (M2AN)

ESAIM: Probability and Statistics (PS)

RAIRO – Theoretical Informatics and Applications

 

 

RAIRO – Operations Research ….

EMS Press | EMS Press launches Subscribe To Open for 10 journals

“EMS Press, the publishing house of the European Mathematical Society, is today announcing the launch of its Subscribe To Open (S2O) programme. 10 journals, including the European Mathematical Society’s flagship journal Journal of the European Mathematical Society, have been selected for the initial S2O round which, if successful, will see those titles flip to open access in January 2021….”

Subscribe to Open: A Mutual Assurance Approach to Open Access  – The Scholarly Kitchen

“Annual Reviews announced today that the 2020 volume of the Annual Review of Cancer Biology has been published open access and that the back volumes of this journal are also now available for free reading. As the pioneer of the Subscribe to Open model, congratulations are due on achieving their first open title. The 2020 articles are published copyright to Annual Reviews with a CC-BY license. The backfiles do not carry a CC license. Annual Reviews developed their Subscribe to Open model in partnership with Raym Crow, Managing Partner, Chain Bridge Group, with funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. As interest in Subscribe to Open grows based on the experiences of early innovations, publishers and libraries need to develop an understanding of the various approaches to Subscribe to Open and the benefits and limitations of the model….

Subscribe to Open is an example of an assurance approach to addressing a collective action challenge. In the Subscribe to Open model developed by Annual Reviews, each subscribing library is motivated to continue to subscribe (because they have been a subscriber and as such have already made a decision that the content is worth paying for) by a discount that is built into the Subscribe to Open offer. The model is two-fold. First, if all libraries continue to subscribe, then not only will those libraries have access to the content for their users, but Annual Reviews will also make the content openly available to non-subscribers as well and apply a CC-BY license to the articles. Second, if all libraries do not continue to subscribe, then those that do will still receive the discount — as well as access to the content — but the content will not be made available to non-subscribers. In either scenario, the subscribing libraries receive a discount and access to the content. Essentially, this is a no-risk opt-in for the subscribing institution. Martin Paul Eve has outlined a similar possible model for society publishers but with a three year rather than annual timeframe. …”

EDP Sciences – Mathematical Modelling of Natural Phenomena transitions to open access under the Subscribe to Open model

“EDP Sciences is delighted to announce the implementation of Subscribe to Open (S2O) as a pilot open access (OA) programme in 2020 for Mathematical Modelling of Natural Phenomena (MMNP). MMNP is an international, peer-reviewed journal publishing multi-disciplinary content on mathematical modelling.

Under the S2O model, existing subscriber institutions are asked to subscribe as usual, and as long as EDP Sciences receives the expected subscription income, then the current volume is made available to all in full open access. The archive also becomes free to read. In this way, institutions support journals for the common good of the academic community and demonstrate their commitment to the long-term sustainability of open access. MMNP has received the required level of support and is now fully open access under the terms of this transformative model….”

Some (serious) open access journals in mathematics | theHigherGeometer

“The following list was originally compiled by Thomas Sauvaget on his blog, Episodic Thoughts, now in stasis. He gave me permission to now host it here and update it as I see fit. If you feel that there is a respectable open access maths journal missing, preferably one that does not charge APCs, then let me know in the comments. Please search in the comments at Thomas’ post to see if it hadn’t already been suggested. I will edit this post as needed, and note that at present I haven’t gone through the list to double check all of these. I will place the checked list under an Creative Commons license at some point….”

arXiv Update – January 2019 – arXiv public wiki – Dashboard

“In 2018, the repository received 140,616 new submissions, a 14% increase from 2017. The subject distribution is evolving as Computer Science represented about 26% of overall submissions, and Math 24%. There were about 228 million downloads from all over the world. arXiv is truly a global resource, with almost 90% of supporting funds coming from sources other than Cornell and 70% of institutional use coming from countries other than the U.S….”

Open Up Resources

“Open Up Resources began as the K-12 OER Collaborative, a 13-state initiative to address quality gaps in the curriculum market.

We partnered with leading math and ELA experts to design the very best standards-aligned core programs.

We provide our superb curricula to districts at no cost by publishing them as Open Educational Resources.

When schools and districts adopt our free curricula, we provide opportunities to reinvest the savings in essential supports, from professional development to printed materials….”

What happens to journals that break away? | Filling a much-needed gap

Although it is still a relatively rare occurrence, several journal boards have broken away from large commercial publishers. A good list is at the Open Access Directory. These journals usually are required to change their name, because the previous publisher will not relinquish it. They are cut off from the enormous support provided by large commercial publishers (after all their subscription prices are so high, the money is surely being put back into developing better infrastructure, rather than, say enriching shareholders, giving inflated honoraria to editors or paying inefficient support staff). Thus one might expect that these journals would struggle.

I looked at the fortunes of the mathematics journals that have taken this route. Below I list the original title name, the approximate date of the breakaway, the new title and publisher, and citation impact measures taken from 2014 data at eigenfactor.org, and compare them to the results for the original journal….

It seems clear that the new journals are doing considerably better than the old ones overall. I wonder whether the idea often touted by radical leftist OA advocates that large commercial publishers don’t add much value could have a grain of truth in it.”

A new journal in combinatorics

Advances in Combinatorics is set up as a combinatorics journal for high-quality papers, principally in the less algebraic parts of combinatorics. It will be an arXiv overlay journal, so free to read, and it will not charge authors. Like its cousin Discrete Analysis (which has recently published its 50th paper) it will be run on the Scholastica platform. Its minimal costs are being paid for by the library at Queen’s University in Ontario, which is also providing administrative support

Investigating peer review overlay services

Today, a new journal in mathematics was launched by Timothy Gowers and Dan Kral. The journal, called ‘Advances in Combinatorics’, is an overlay journal, built entirely on articles contained in the arXiv repository. It is free to read and will not charge authors to publish. The relatively low costs of running the journal are being covered by Queen’s University Library in Ontario, Canada, which is also providing administrative support.