The University of Tsukuba and F1000 Research lead the way in Open Science with first open research publishing gateway to publish in Japanese – F1000 Blogs

“Today, the University of Tsukuba has announced that it has signed a contract with F1000 Research Ltd to develop the first open research publishing gateway that will enable researchers to publish in either English or Japanese.

Not only will the publishing gateway make it simple for authors affiliated with the University of Tsukuba to publish any research or data they wish to share rapidly, openly and transparently, but it will also enable those studying the humanities and social sciences to choose whether to publish in English or in Japanese.

Indeed, English holds a preeminent position as the “lingua franca” in international scientific communication, despite the majority of the world’s scholars not possessing English as their first language. This does not necessarily mean, however, that studies published in other languages are of less value or quality.

This forward-thinking publishing approach means that researchers specializing in fields such as humanities and social sciences will be able to publish in an international journal but choose which language they feel most comfortable writing in, as well as what befits their field of study the most.

Indeed, the humanities and social sciences fields are where publishing in a regional language would enable more profound understanding and knowledge sharing, given these academic disciplines are often dedicated to the study of philosophy, history, literature, society, law, economy, and so on of a specific culture. Japanese language research articles will include abstracts and metadata in both Japanese and English, and will be indexed in relevant bibliographic databases in both English and Japanese….”

The University of Tsukuba and F1000 Research lead the way in Open Science with first open research publishing gateway to publish in Japanese – F1000 Blogs

“Today, the University of Tsukuba has announced that it has signed a contract with F1000 Research Ltd to develop the first open research publishing gateway that will enable researchers to publish in either English or Japanese.

Not only will the publishing gateway make it simple for authors affiliated with the University of Tsukuba to publish any research or data they wish to share rapidly, openly and transparently, but it will also enable those studying the humanities and social sciences to choose whether to publish in English or in Japanese.

Indeed, English holds a preeminent position as the “lingua franca” in international scientific communication, despite the majority of the world’s scholars not possessing English as their first language. This does not necessarily mean, however, that studies published in other languages are of less value or quality.

This forward-thinking publishing approach means that researchers specializing in fields such as humanities and social sciences will be able to publish in an international journal but choose which language they feel most comfortable writing in, as well as what befits their field of study the most.

Indeed, the humanities and social sciences fields are where publishing in a regional language would enable more profound understanding and knowledge sharing, given these academic disciplines are often dedicated to the study of philosophy, history, literature, society, law, economy, and so on of a specific culture. Japanese language research articles will include abstracts and metadata in both Japanese and English, and will be indexed in relevant bibliographic databases in both English and Japanese….”

How can we understand the different effects of UKRI’s open access policy on small learned societies in the humanities? | Samuel Moore

The UKRI open access consultation deadline is this Friday and we’re likely to see a flurry of responses leading up to it. One response to the consultation caught my eye today from the Friends of Coleridge, a society that ‘exists to foster interest in the life and works of the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge and his circle’. I wanted to jot down a couple of thoughts on this because I think it represents something quite interesting about the way that open access is playing out within UK humanities organisations.
 

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Jisc Collections and Brill reach Transformative Agreement for UK Libraries

“Jisc Collections and the international scholarly publisher Brill have reached a Transformative Agreement for 2020, which covers the SHEDL consortium as well as all other eligible UK university libraries.

Under the Agreement, academics at participating institutions benefit from reading access to the Full Brill Journal Collection, as well as unlimited Open Access publishing in all Brill journals for 2020. Brill’s journal portfolio consists of more than 330 hybrid and fully Open Access titles in the Humanities, Social Sciences, International Law, and Biology. Articles which have already been published in 2020 will be made available in Open Access retroactively….”

What is open-access publishing and what it means for the forensic enterprise – ScienceDirect

“Currently, two journals in the forensic science realm publish as Open Access, Forensic Science International: Synergy and Forensic Science International: Reports. Forensic Science International: Synergy welcomes significant, insightful, and innovative original research with the aim of advancing and supporting forensic science while exceeding its expectations for excellence. By being freely available to anyone, we seek to promote and support open discourse across diverse areas of interest, avocation, and geography. Papers are invited from all forensic sciences and influencing disciplines, including but not limited to the humanities, life sciences, social sciences, and the law….”

Open access of psychological intervention manuals – Watts – 2020 – World Psychiatry – Wiley Online Library

“In summary, only two studies (7%) reporting results of a psychological treatment for common mental disorders in LMICs provided citations to the exact manual used in the study, and only two (7%) provided open access to the manual.

Access to treatment manuals for psychological interventions is important for the replication and independent scrutiny of study results and for the dissemination of effective interventions.

Change is not only needed but also feasible. For example, two relevant RCTs of psychological treatments were released around the same time of the systematic review3 and were thus not included in our analyses. One included a reference to an online version of the exact manual used8, and the other offered access to a linked training programme to learn the intervention9.

Accessibility to treatment manuals is a key aspect of open science of psychological treatments. Mental health journals and research funders should consider setting up mechanisms that require authors of RCTs to make the psychological treatment manuals they used open access.”

TRIPLE USER RESEARCH QUESTIONNAIRE

“The following questionnaire is part of the user research conducted for the European H2020 project TRIPLE. The questionnaire is aimed at researchers/academics in Social Sciences and Humanities at any stage of their careers.

In the following you will be asked mainly a number of questions about your discoverability research work practices and about the future of TRIPLE.

The questionnaire contains 21 questions and it should take between 10 to 15 minutes to complete.

TRIPLE was launched on 7 October 2019. It will be one of the dedicated services of OPERAS, the Research Infrastructure supporting open scholarly communication in the Social Sciences and Humanities in the European Research Area. At the heart of the project is the development of the TRIPLE platform, an innovative multilingual and multicultural discovery solution….”

Annual Review of Political Science uses Subscribe to Open to publish 2020 volume open access

Nonprofit publisher Annual Reviews is pleased to announce that the 2020 volume of the Annual Review of Political Science has been converted from gated to open access, with all articles published under a CC BY license. The back volumes, dating from 1998, are now freely available. The Annual Review of Political Science is the third of five journals included in a 2020 pilot program for Subscribe to Open.

For further information or to set up an interview, contact Liz Allen, Director of MarCom and Strategic Development at Annual Reviews (lallen@annualreviews.org). 

 

TagTeam :: Annual Review of Public Health uses Subscribe to Open to publish 2020 volume open accessGet started as a tagger – Harvard Open Access Project – peter.suber’s bookmarks – Open Access Tracking Project (OATP)

Nonprofit publisher Annual Reviews is pleased to announce that the 2020 volume of the Annual Review of Political Science has been converted from gated to open access, with all articles published under a CC BY license. The back volumes, dating from 1998, are now freely available. The Annual Review of Political Science is the third of five journals included in a 2020 pilot program for Subscribe to Open.

For further information or to set up an interview, contact Liz Allen, Director of MarCom and Strategic Development at Annual Reviews (lallen@annualreviews.org). 

 

News – The University of Oslo joins OLH LPS model

“We are very pleased to announce that the University of Oslo has joined the Open Library of Humanities’ Library Partnership Subsidy system. The University of Oslo (Norwegian: Universitetet i Oslo), until 1939 named the Royal Frederick University (Norwegian: Det Kongelige Frederiks Universitet), is the oldest university in Norway, located in the Norwegian capital of Oslo. The university was established in 1813, when the city after which it is named was still just a provincial town called Christiania. Since then it has made academic breakthroughs in law, science (especially maritime science) and played a key role in Norway’s liberation from Denmark. The university constitutes Norway’s largest research institution comprising eight faculties: Theology, Law, Medicine, Humanities, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Dentistry, Social Sciences, and Education. It offers over 800 courses, all taught in English, with 40 Master’s degree programmes also taught in English. Five Nobel Laureates are associated with the university. They include chemist Odd Hassel, economist Ragnar Frisch and Ivar Giæver, an electrical engineer who worked on electron tunnelling and biophysics.

The Open Library of Humanities is an academic-led, gold open-access publisher with no author-facing charges. With initial funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the platform covers its costs by payments from an international library consortium, rather than any kind of author fee….”