The Magic That Happens When Designers Get Open Access to Art – Shapeways Magazine

“Earlier this year we announced a unique design partnership with the National Gallery of Denmark (known to those in the know as the SMK). The SMK is a leader in the OpenGLAM (Open Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museums) movement and has made a huge amount of its art collection — pieces old enough to be in the public domain — available to the public without copyright restrictions. We partnered with the SMK to invite the Shapeways design community to create new pieces of jewelry based on six artworks selected by SMK curators. One winner and four runners up would be featured in the SMK itself, and other entries would be featured in SMK’s online shop.”

European survey on scholarly practices and digital needs in the arts and humanities – Highlights Report | Zenodo

“Between 10-15% of respondents reported very frequent use of open access journals or publications, institutional portals and repositories, personal blogs or websites, and scholarly communities such as Academia and ResearchGate, to disseminate their work. A larger percentage, between 35-45%, use this ‘tetrad’ of dissemination channels regularly. On the other hand, eight out of ten state that they have used open content journals or publication, albeit seldom….”

Stand der Dinge: Open Access in der Verwaltungsforschung – Open PuMa

From Google translate:

The state of affairs: Open Access in administrative research

What options are available for openly publishing articles and books, what this costs and how authors can refinance these fees.

Chen and Olijhoek 2016 have reviewed 1000 scientific journals worldwide and developed a measure of Open Access (OA) quality. Unfortunately, no specific results for individual research areas, such as administrative sciences, can be read from this study. Among other things, despite the subject of the study, no data is provided here, where you could have understood this yourself! However, Melero et al 2017 take up the instrument developed by Chen and Olijhoek and use it to examine the Spanish journal landscape. Here are the social science journals those with the highest OA rate and the strongest author rights, probably mainly because the journals are published according to this study, especially by educational and research institutions. These usually work in a nonprofit way and do not make a profit with the release.”

Is the Center for Open Science a Viable Alternative for Elsevier? – Enago Academy

“Data management has become an increasingly discussed topic among the academic community. Managing data is an element of open science, which has proven to increase dissemination of research and citations for journal articles. Open science increases public access to academic articles, mostly through preprint repositories. Indeed, according to this study, open access (OA) articles are associated with a 36-172% increase in citations compared to non-OA articles. Publishers such as Elsevier have acquired preprint repositories to increase the dissemination of academic research.”

Open Folklore

“A partnership of the American Folklore Society and the Indiana University Libraries, Open Folklore is a scholarly resource devoted to increasing the number and variety of open access resources, published and unpublished, that are available for the field of folklore studies and the communities with whom folklore scholars partner….”

Radical Open Access – Building Horizontal Alliances

“ABOUT THE COLLECTIVE

Formed in 2015, the Radical Open Access Collective is a community of scholar-led, not-for-profit presses, journals and other open access projects. Now consisting of over twenty members, we promote a progressive vision for open publishing in the humanities and social sciences. What we have in common is an understanding of open access as being characterised by a spirit of ongoing creative experimentation. We also share a willingness to subject some of our most established scholarly communication practices to creative critique, together with the institutions that sustain them (the university, the library, the publishing house and so on). The collective thus offers a radical ‘alternative’ to the conservative versions of open access that are currently being put forward by commercially-oriented presses, funders and policy makers….”