PsychOpen CAMA

“PsychOpen CAMA enables accessing meta-analytic datasets, reproducing meta-analyses and dynamically updating evidence from new primary studies collaboratively….

A CAMA (Community Augmented Meta Analysis) is an open repository for meta-analytic data, that provides meta-analytic analysis tools….

PsychOpen CAMA enables easy access and automated reproducibility of meta-analyses in psychology and related fields. This has several benefits for the research community:

Evidence can be kept updated by adding new studies published after the meta-analysis.
Researchers with special research questions can use subsets of the data or rerun meta-analyses using different moderators.
Flexible analyses with the datasets enable the application of new statistical procedures or different graphical displays.
The cumulated evidence in the CAMA can be used to get a quick overview of existing research gaps. This may give an idea of which study designs or moderators may be especially interesting for future studies to use limited resources for research in a way to enhance evidence.
Given existing meta-analytic evidence, the necessary sample size of future studies to detect an effect of a reasonable size can be estimated. Moreover, the effect of possible future studies on the results of the existing meta-analytic evidence can be simulated.
PsychOpen CAMA offers tutorials to better understand the reasoning behind meta-analyses and to learn the basic steps of conducting a meta-analysis to empower other researchers to contribute to our project for the benefit of the research community….”

 

 

Major OA Diamond Journals Study completed: Report emphasizes diversity and sustainable pathways for diamond Open Access – OASPA

OASPA is pleased to announce the publication of an in-depth report and associated recommendations arising from a study of open access journals across the world that are free for readers and authors, usually referred to as “OA diamond journals”. 

Funded by Science Europe and commissioned by cOAlition S in order to gain a better understanding of the OA diamond landscape, the publication of the study is the culmination of work undertaken from June 2020 to February 2021 by a consortium of 10 organisations (including OASPA) led by OPERAS. The study uncovers a vast archipelago of up to 29,000 journals, most of which (60%) are in the humanities and social sciences, serving the needs of multiple scientific communities across the world.

Demography journal now open access – with Penn Libraries support | Penn Libraries

“The Penn Libraries support open access publishing through funding for the ejournal Demography.

The Population Association of America has moved its journal Demography to platinum open access. The journal’s changeover coincides with its shift to Duke University Press from Springer Publishing….”

News – Building LLTDM

“On June 23-26, we welcomed 32 digital humanities (DH) researchers and professionals to the Building Legal Literacies for Text Data Mining (Building LLTDM) Institute. Our goal was to empower DH researchers, librarians, and professional staff to confidently navigate law, policy, ethics, and risk within digital humanities text data mining (TDM) projects—so they can more easily engage in this type of research and contribute to the further advancement of knowledge. We were joined by a stellar group of faculty to teach and mentor participants. Building LLTDM is supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities….”

The American Sociological Association is collapsing and its organization is a perpetual stagnation machine – Family Inequality

“One virtually inevitable outcome is the association further committing to its reliance on paywalled journal publishing and the profit-maximizing contract with Sage, and opposing efforts to open access to research for the public….

I can’t say that the things I tried to do on the publications committee would have had a positive effect on ASA membership, journal rankings, majors, or any other metric of impact for the association. However, I do believe what I proposed would have helped the association take a few small steps in the direction of keeping up with the social science community on issues of research transparency and openness. In November I reported how, more than two years ago now, I proposed that the association adopt the Transparency and Openness Promotion Guidelines from the Center for Open Science, and to start using their Open Science Badges, which recognize authors who provide open data, open materials, or use preregistration for their studies. (In the November post I discussed the challenge of cultural and institutional change on this issue, and why it’s important, so I won’t repeat that here.)…

While I’m at it, I should update you on the petition many of you signed in December 2019, in opposition to the ASA leadership sending a letter to President Trump against a potential federal policy that would make the results of taxpayer-funded research immediately available to the public for free — presumably at some cost to ASA’s paywall revenues. At the January 2020 meeting the publications committee passed two motions:

For the Committee on Publications to express opposition to the decision by the ASA to sign the December 18, 2019 letter.
To encourage Council to discuss implications of the existing embargo and possible changes to the policy and to urge decisionmakers to consult with the scientific community before making executive orders.

Why they shared: recovering early arguments for sharing social scientific data | Science in Context | Cambridge Core

Abstract:  Most social scientists today think of data sharing as an ethical imperative essential to making social science more transparent, verifiable, and replicable. But what moved the architects of some of the U.S.’s first university-based social scientific research institutions, the University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research (ISR), and its spin-off, the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), to share their data? Relying primarily on archived records, unpublished personal papers, and oral histories, I show that Angus Campbell, Warren Miller, Philip Converse, and others understood sharing data not as an ethical imperative intrinsic to social science but as a useful means to the diverse ends of financial stability, scholarly and institutional autonomy, and epistemological reproduction. I conclude that data sharing must be evaluated not only on the basis of the scientific ideals its supporters affirm, but also on the professional objectives it serves.

 

About ASL-LEX | ASL-LEX: A Lexical Database of American Sign Language

“ASL-LEX is a database of lexical and phonological properties of American Sign Language signs. It was first released in 2016 with nearly 1,000 signs. ASL-LEX was updated in Fall 2020 with greatly expanded information and an increased size of 2,723 signs.

ASL-LEX is available as a searchable web interface and as raw data in spreadsheet form. This website hosts the web visualization and provides instructions for how to use and download the database….”

About ASL-LEX | ASL-LEX: A Lexical Database of American Sign Language

“ASL-LEX is a database of lexical and phonological properties of American Sign Language signs. It was first released in 2016 with nearly 1,000 signs. ASL-LEX was updated in Fall 2020 with greatly expanded information and an increased size of 2,723 signs.

ASL-LEX is available as a searchable web interface and as raw data in spreadsheet form. This website hosts the web visualization and provides instructions for how to use and download the database….”

Improving Social Science: Lessons from the Open Science Movement | PS: Political Science & Politics | Cambridge Core

“Recent years have been times of turmoil for psychological science. Depending on whom you ask, the field underwent a “replication crisis” (Shrout and Rodgers 2018) or a “credibility revolution” (Vazire 2018) that might even climax in “psychology’s renaissance” (Nelson, Simmons, and Simonsohn 2018). This article asks what social scientists can learn from this story. Our take-home message is that although differences in research practices make it difficult to prescribe cures across disciplines, much still can be learned from interdisciplinary exchange. We provide nine lessons but first summarize psychology’s experience and what sets it apart from neighboring disciplines….”

Postdoc–Computational Social Science for Scholarly Communications & Open & Equitable Scholarship – Cambridge MA 02139

“POSTDOCTOAL ASSOCIATE-COMPUTATIONAL SOCIAL SCIENCE FOR SCHOLARLY COMMUNICATIONS AND OPEN AND EQUITABLE SCHOLARSHIP, MIT Libraries-Center for Research on Equitable and Open Scholarship (CREOS), to conduct original research in the areas of open and equitable scholarship under the guidance of the principal investigator, Roger Levy, and in partnership with additional faculty mentors, research scientists, and fellow postdocs. Will conduct original research in computational social science (broadly construed) on topics related to scholarly communications and open and equitable scholarship. Potential topics include large-scale automated analysis of the history of ideas; experimental interventions and natural experiments in scholarly peer review and reproducible research; critical economic analysis of the scholarly publication landscape; review and development of best-practices guidelines for large collaborative open scholarship projects; and comparison and advocacy work for open-source platforms for managing peer review. …”