Guest Post – A Look at the User-Centric Future of Academic Research Software — And Why It Matters, Part 2: Implications – The Scholarly Kitchen

“Yesterday’s post discussed current trends in the landscape of research and academic software. Today, we look at the implications of those trends. First, we look at the reproducibility crisis as a case study of how researcher-built tools can help to solve tough problems faced by the community. Second, we look at some of the broader possible implications for the scholarly communication space….”

Guest Post – A Look at the User-Centric Future of Academic Research Software — And Why It Matters, Part 1: Trends – The Scholarly Kitchen

“Researchers are now able to create viable products and services in a highly decentralized fashion, which means it is increasingly likely that there will be a gap between the software landscape that publishers and other stakeholders currently envision, and the one that will soon exist.  As researchers become more tech-savvy, many are developing products for themselves and leveraging commercial, yet open source, technologies to create modern platforms and services that not only fit their needs, but are easy to use; this is a bellwether for the tools researchers and publishers are likely to see on the horizon….”

scite awarded NIH SBIR Fast-Track grant – scite – Medium

“Scite, Inc., a Brooklyn-based startup focused on making research more reliable, has been awarded a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Fast-Track grant by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to conduct further research required for developing and commercializing a platform that identifies studies supporting or contradicting prior research. The award is issued in two phases with a Phase I limit of $225,000 and a Phase II limit of $1,500,000 with the second phase contingent upon meeting specific milestones….”

$100M health initiative aims to democratize data science | Devex

“On Wednesday, the Rockefeller Foundation announced a new effort to prevent 6 million maternal and child deaths in 10 countries by 2030.

Launched on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly, and on the heels of the U.N. High-Level Meeting on Universal Health Coverage, the $100 million Precision Public Health initiative aims to ensure that frontline health workers have access to data science tools such as predictive analytics, artificial intelligence, and machine learning….”

$100M health initiative aims to democratize data science | Devex

“On Wednesday, the Rockefeller Foundation announced a new effort to prevent 6 million maternal and child deaths in 10 countries by 2030.

Launched on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly, and on the heels of the U.N. High-Level Meeting on Universal Health Coverage, the $100 million Precision Public Health initiative aims to ensure that frontline health workers have access to data science tools such as predictive analytics, artificial intelligence, and machine learning….”

Guest post: a technical update from our development team – News Service

“Here are some major bits of work that we have carried out:

Enhancements to our historical data management system. We track all changes to the body of publicly available objects (Journals and Articles) and we have a better process for handling that.
Introduced a more advanced testing framework for the source code. As DOAJ gains more features, the code becomes larger and more complex. To ensure that it is properly tested for before going into production, we have started to use parameterised testing on the core components. This allows us to carry out broader and deeper testing to ensure the system is defect free.
A weekly data dump of the entire public dataset (Journals and Articles) which is freely downloadable.
A major data cleanup on articles: a few tens of thousands of duplicates, from historical data or sneaking in through validation loopholes, were identified and removed. We closed the loopholes and cleaned up the data.
A complete new hardware infrastructure, using Cloudflare. This resulted in the significant increase in stability mentioned above and allows us to cope with our growing data set (increasing at a rate of around 750,000 records per year at this point).

And here are some projects we have been working on which you will see come into effect over the next few weeks:

A completely new search front-end. It looks very similar to the old one, but with some major improvements under-the-hood (more powerful, more responsive, more accessible), and gives us the capability to build better, cooler interfaces in the future.
Support for Crossref XML as an article upload format. In the future this may also be extended to the API and we may also integrate directly with Crossref to harvest articles for you. We support the current Crossref schema (4.7) and we will be supporting new versions as they come along….”

Born-digital, open source, media-rich scholarly publishing that’s as easy as blogging.

“Scalar is a free, open source authoring and publishing platform that’s designed to make it easy for authors to write long-form, born-digital scholarship online. Scalar enables users to assemble media from multiple sources and juxtapose them with their own writing in a variety of ways, with minimal technical expertise required.

More fundamentally, Scalar is a semantic web authoring tool that brings a considered balance between standardization and structural flexibility to all kinds of material. It includes a built-in reading interface as well as an API that enables Scalar content to be used to drive custom-designed applications. If you’re dealing with small to moderate amounts of structured content and need a lightweight platform that encourages improvisation with your data model, Scalar may be the right solution for you.

Scalar also gives authors tools to structure essay- and book-length works in ways that take advantage of the unique capabilities of digital writing, including nested, recursive, and non-linear formats. The platform also supports collaborative authoring and reader commentary. The ANVC’s partner presses and archives are now beginning to implement Scalar into their research and publishing workflows, and several projects leveraging the platform have been published already.

Scalar is a project of the Alliance for Networking Visual Culture (ANVC) in association with Vectors and  IML, and with the support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities….”

Home – Profeza

“A set of workflow software tools that guides article authors to make the scientific outputs including Additional Research Objects (AROs, i.e datasets and null results) more easily reproducible/reusable and it captures all the events of reuse over the period of time after publications to reward those who have contributed towards it. It makes the improvement of research outputs a continuous process rather than one-time event….”

Safe Data Sharing: How Harvard-developed research tools helped Suso Baleato win the 2019 poster prize of the FAS Postdoc Research Symposium | Institute for Quantitative Social Science

“Ask Dr. Suso Baleato about how his past two years working as a postdoctoral fellow at IQSS furthered his research, and he will talk less about the research itself than on the exciting technologies that have enabled it to be analyzed and made public. “Differential privacy,” he said, “is a computational way to safely share statistical analysis of sensitive data. Now you can apply differential privacy to real cases. This is IQSS!”

To understand the importance of differential privacy and two other Harvard-developed tools, DataTags and Dataverse, one need look no farther than Baleato’s work studying the digitalization of society. Personal computers, mobile phones, social media, the internet itself – these have all seen exponential growth in the past two decades, allowing average citizens to answer their doorbells and control the settings on their toasters from halfway across the globe. More importantly, the rise of digitalization has made information more accessible, in some cases beyond what some governments may wish their citizens to have….”