Biologer: an open platform for collecting biodiversity data

Abstract:  Background

We have developed a new platform named “Biologer” intended for recording species observations in the field (but also from literature resources and collections). The platform is created as user-friendly, open source, multilingual software that is compatible with Darwin Core standard and accompanied by a simple Android application. It is made from the user’s perspective, allowing everyone to choose how they share the data. Project team members are delegated by involved organisations. The team is responsible for development of the platform, while local Biologer communities are engaged in data collection and verification.

New information

Biologer has been online and available for use in Serbia since 2018 and was soon adopted in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. In total, we have assembled 536 users, who have collected 163,843 species observation records data from the field and digitalised 33,458 literature records. The number of active users and their records is growing daily. Out of the total number of gathered data, 89% has been made open access by the users, 10% is accessible on the scale of 10×10 km and only 1% is closed. In the future, we plan to provide a taxonomic data portal that could be used by local and national initiatives in Eastern Europe, aggregate all data into a single web location, create detailed data overview and enable fluent communication between users.

Biologer: an open platform for collecting biodiversity data

Abstract:  Background

We have developed a new platform named “Biologer” intended for recording species observations in the field (but also from literature resources and collections). The platform is created as user-friendly, open source, multilingual software that is compatible with Darwin Core standard and accompanied by a simple Android application. It is made from the user’s perspective, allowing everyone to choose how they share the data. Project team members are delegated by involved organisations. The team is responsible for development of the platform, while local Biologer communities are engaged in data collection and verification.

New information

Biologer has been online and available for use in Serbia since 2018 and was soon adopted in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. In total, we have assembled 536 users, who have collected 163,843 species observation records data from the field and digitalised 33,458 literature records. The number of active users and their records is growing daily. Out of the total number of gathered data, 89% has been made open access by the users, 10% is accessible on the scale of 10×10 km and only 1% is closed. In the future, we plan to provide a taxonomic data portal that could be used by local and national initiatives in Eastern Europe, aggregate all data into a single web location, create detailed data overview and enable fluent communication between users.

New Editoria Release – Oia : Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

“Oia is the name of the latest Editoria release out today. Oia is part of the municipality of Santorini, Greece. Alex Georgantas, Coko Dev and lead Editoria developer has been hard at work over the last months and we are proud to announce the release of Editoria Oia!

There have been many new features, and some fixes, added to Editoria in this release, however the main item is the new Asset manager. The Asset Manager takes Editoria along a lot of new paths which pushes the tool further into a league of its own wen it comes to professional book creation tools….”

The open scholarship ecosystem faces collapse; it’s also our best hope for a more resilient future | Impact of Social Sciences

“The COVID-19 pandemic is significantly impacting universities and higher education institutions, reducing budgets and presenting new design challenges that will fundamentally alter how research and scholarship operate. Economic volatility is also constraining support for key systems and services that the academy relies on, especially those that are community-led. Kaitlin Thaney argues that there’s a need to converge on community-controlled open scholarship projects, to both meet the demands of the moment, and build a more resilient system for scholarly communication for future crisis situations, and invites readers to participate in planning how such systems can be maintained….

Openness is going to be more radically accepted (even demanded) than ever before post-crisis.

Many key pieces of scholarly research landscape are at risk of going out of business or consolidating by the end of the year. Looking ahead 12-18 months, there is a real threat of infrastructure collapse, the severity and downstream effects of which are not yet fully known at this time.

The current state of funding and resourcing will force institutions to do more with less and to think beyond their walls about shared models of financing….”

The open scholarship ecosystem faces collapse; it’s also our best hope for a more resilient future | Impact of Social Sciences

“The COVID-19 pandemic is significantly impacting universities and higher education institutions, reducing budgets and presenting new design challenges that will fundamentally alter how research and scholarship operate. Economic volatility is also constraining support for key systems and services that the academy relies on, especially those that are community-led. Kaitlin Thaney argues that there’s a need to converge on community-controlled open scholarship projects, to both meet the demands of the moment, and build a more resilient system for scholarly communication for future crisis situations, and invites readers to participate in planning how such systems can be maintained….

Openness is going to be more radically accepted (even demanded) than ever before post-crisis.

Many key pieces of scholarly research landscape are at risk of going out of business or consolidating by the end of the year. Looking ahead 12-18 months, there is a real threat of infrastructure collapse, the severity and downstream effects of which are not yet fully known at this time.

The current state of funding and resourcing will force institutions to do more with less and to think beyond their walls about shared models of financing….”

Open-Access Data and Computational Resources to Address COVID-19 | Data Science at NIH

“COVID-19 open-access data and computational resources are being provided by federal agencies, including NIH, public consortia, and private entities. These resources are freely available to researchers, and this page will be updated as more information becomes available. 

The Office of Data Science Strategy seeks to provide the research community with links to open-access data, computational, and supporting resources. These resources are being aggregated and posted for scientific and public health interests. Inclusion of a resource on this list does not mean it has been evaluated or endorsed by NIH….”

Join us to create, edit, and curate at OSKB Hackathon at SIPS 2020! – YouTube

“Dive into a brand new OSKB prototype and make a contribution during our hackathon! Learn how individuals or organizations can collaborate with OSKB to curate, review, and contribute resources for the purpose of accessible instruction in open research best practices for all.

Brainstorm, review, and improve the OSKB editorial and governance plans at SIPS 2020!…”

Ten tips for a text-mining-ready article: How to improve automated discoverability and interpretability

Abstract:  Data-driven research in biomedical science requires structured, computable data. Increasingly, these data are created with support from automated text mining. Text-mining tools have rapidly matured: although not perfect, they now frequently provide outstanding results. We describe 10 straightforward writing tips—and a web tool, PubReCheck—guiding authors to help address the most common cases that remain difficult for text-mining tools. We anticipate these guides will help authors’ work be found more readily and used more widely, ultimately increasing the impact of their work and the overall benefit to both authors and readers. PubReCheck is available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/research/pubrecheck.

 

Personal open access report with one click – SNF

Which of my scientific publications are openly accessible? As of now, researchers in Switzerland can find the answer to this question by using the “SNSF Open Access Check” web application. This prototype searches articles that have been published since 2015.

Welcome to the COrDa wiki!

“The Community ORCID Dashboard (CoRDa) is a project to answer the question “Who in my institution does and does not have an ORCID iD”?

Bringing together a wide range of open and institutional data sources, it will composite them through an abstract layer into an accessible reporting and visualisation portal – the dashboard….”