Project AIUR by Iris.ai: Democratize Science through blockchain-enabled disintermediation

“There are a number of problems in the world of science today hampering global progress. In an almost monopolized industry with terrible incentive misalignments, a radical change is needed. The only way to change this is with a grassroots movement – of researchers and scientists, librarians, scientific societies, R&D departments, universities, students, and innovators – coming together. We need to remove the powerful intermediaries, create new incentive structures, build commonly owned tools to validate all research and build a common Validated Repository of human knowledge. A combination of blockchain and artificial intelligence provides the technology framework, but as with all research, the scientist herself needs to be in the center. That is what we are proposing with Project Aiur, and we hope you will join us….

The outlined core software tool of the community will be the Knowledge Validation Engine (KVE). It will be a fully-fledged technical platform able to pinpoint: ? the building blocks of a scientific text;

? what the reader needs to know to be able to understand the text;

? what are the text’s factual sources; and,

? what is the reproducibility level of the different building blocks.

The platform will take a scientific document in the form of a scientific paper or technical report as an input, and it will provide an analytical report presenting:

? the knowledge architecture of the document;

? the hypotheses tree supporting the presented document’s hypothesis;

? the support level found for each of the hypotheses on the hypotheses tree; and,

? their respective reproducibility. All of this will be based on the knowledge database of scientific documents accessible to the system at any given point in time (knowledge in an Open Access environment). …”

Decentralised Authoring, Annotations and Notifications for a Read-Write Web with dokieli

Abstract:  Decentralising the creation, publication, and annotation of hypertext documents provides authors with a technological guarantee for independence of any publication authority. While the Web was designed as a decentralised environment, individual authors still lack the ability to conveniently author and publish documents, and to engage in social interactions with documents of others in a truly decentralised fashion. We present dokieli, a fully decentralised, browser-based authoring and annotation platform with built-in support for social interactions, through which people retain the ownership of and sovereignty over their data. The resulting “living” documents are interoperable and independent of dokieli since they follow standards and best practices, such as HTML+RDFa for a fine-grained semantic structure, Linked Data Platform for personal data storage, and Linked Data Notifications for updates. This article describes dokieli’s architecture and implementation, demonstrating advanced document authoring and interaction without a single point of control. Such an environment provides the right technological conditions for independent publication of scientific articles, news, and other works that benefit from diverse voices and open interactions.

Decentralised Authoring, Annotations and Notifications for a Read-Write Web with dokieli

Abstract:  Decentralising the creation, publication, and annotation of hypertext documents provides authors with a technological guarantee for independence of any publication authority. While the Web was designed as a decentralised environment, individual authors still lack the ability to conveniently author and publish documents, and to engage in social interactions with documents of others in a truly decentralised fashion. We present dokieli, a fully decentralised, browser-based authoring and annotation platform with built-in support for social interactions, through which people retain the ownership of and sovereignty over their data. The resulting “living” documents are interoperable and independent of dokieli since they follow standards and best practices, such as HTML+RDFa for a fine-grained semantic structure, Linked Data Platform for personal data storage, and Linked Data Notifications for updates. This article describes dokieli’s architecture and implementation, demonstrating advanced document authoring and interaction without a single point of control. Such an environment provides the right technological conditions for independent publication of scientific articles, news, and other works that benefit from diverse voices and open interactions.

Linked Research

“Linked Research is an initiative, a movement, and a manifesto. We believe that scholarly communication is stunted by current academic publishing practices, and we aim to promote change for the greater good. This is not something hypothetical or a dream for the future, it is completely possible with today’s technologies. A cultural shift is needed, and Linked Research is here to bring together like-minded people who want to push this forwards.

Linked Research is not biased towards any particular tool or technology; we understand that different researchers and disciplines have different needs and desires around scholarly communication. We encourage the use of any technologies that comply with the Linked Research principles….”

Publish your research in a space you control, on your own terms. You do not need permission to make your work accessible to all….Create unique identifiers for everything you think is important, from data objects to sections of prose, so others can refer to and reuse them….Reuse and link to other research and data so nothing goes to waste or is reinvented. Keep a machine-readable trace of inspirations and derivations….Have an open comments policy so that anyone can review and generate discussion around your work….Reject information silos, paywalls, academic box-ticking, and archaic and artificial barriers. Be the change; publish your research using a free culture license, and openly review the work of others….”

Linked Research

“Linked Research is an initiative, a movement, and a manifesto. We believe that scholarly communication is stunted by current academic publishing practices, and we aim to promote change for the greater good. This is not something hypothetical or a dream for the future, it is completely possible with today’s technologies. A cultural shift is needed, and Linked Research is here to bring together like-minded people who want to push this forwards.

Linked Research is not biased towards any particular tool or technology; we understand that different researchers and disciplines have different needs and desires around scholarly communication. We encourage the use of any technologies that comply with the Linked Research principles….”

Publish your research in a space you control, on your own terms. You do not need permission to make your work accessible to all….Create unique identifiers for everything you think is important, from data objects to sections of prose, so others can refer to and reuse them….Reuse and link to other research and data so nothing goes to waste or is reinvented. Keep a machine-readable trace of inspirations and derivations….Have an open comments policy so that anyone can review and generate discussion around your work….Reject information silos, paywalls, academic box-ticking, and archaic and artificial barriers. Be the change; publish your research using a free culture license, and openly review the work of others….”

Linked Research: An Approach for Scholarly Communication

Abstract:  The future of scholarly communication involves research results, analysis and data all being produced, published, verified and reused interactively on the Web, with ‘papers’ linking to and from each other at a granular level. The academic process of peer review is increasingly becoming open, transparent and decentralised. More broadly, the mechanism for global knowledge sharing is becoming an ongoing conversation between experts, policy makers, implementers, and the general public. This vision is radical, and getting there requires understanding of, and change in, a number of interrelated areas. In this article we break down the problem space and define requirements for advancement towards a Web-based ecosystem for scholarly communication: Linked Research. We discuss our strategy for tackling each of these areas. This includes how we can build on and combine existing well-known technologies and practices for digital publishing, social interactions, decentralised data storage, and semantic data enrichment. We provide an initial assessment of our proposed strategy through an example implementation of tooling which sets out to meet the requirements.