Could This Search Engine Save Your Life? – The Chronicle of Higher Education

One of the Allen Institute’s priorities is an academically oriented search engine, established in 2015, called Semantic Scholar (slogan: “Cut through the clutter”). The need is great, with more than 34,000 peer-reviewed journals publishing 2.5 million articles a year. “What if a cure for an intractable cancer is hidden within the tedious reports on thousands of clinical studies?,” Etzioni once said.

Although Semantic Scholar has focused so far on computer and biomedical sciences, Etzioni says that the engine will soon push into the social sciences and the humanities as well. The Chronicle spoke with him about information overload, impact factors’ imperfect inevitability, and the promise and perils of AI….”

Illuminating Dark Knowledge – Generation R

“How innovation in search engines needs renewing with open working and open indexes…

Without being able to build on top of existing — search tools and indexes — innovation in search engines is being held back and letting down researchers and the public. The Open Access and Open Science movement that have worked hard to make free hundreds of thousands of publications, but at the last mile search engines are failing to effectively deliver on discovery. Public knowledge is hidden in plain sight — a phenomenon called “Dark Knowledge”. This article is a call for open infrastructural ‘ways of working’ to be adopted as ‘the new normal’ to turn this situation around in software and interface development for scholarly search….”

Open Access Africa

Open Access Africa offers you the possibility to personalize the interface, to set up your own personal library of documents, or to set up an automatic alert query that would run periodically and would notify you of search results by email….

Collections are a different way to discover content. Instead of searching, you can browse different categories and sub-categories. Curators of this repository have carefully put together content in a meaningful way. Enjoy!….”

Lens.org – detailed review of a new open discovery and citation index | Musings about librarianship

I first read about Lens.org via a tweet on my way back from a conference in April 2018. There seemed to be something in the water at the time, as they was an explosion of new discovery services and idexes in the past few months, including Digital science’s Dimensions, 1Science’s 1Findr, Scilit and the new resurgent challenge to Google Scholar posed by Microsoft Academic….

I have come to realise that Lens might in fact be a far more exciting development than I thought.

While it is true that the scholarly search portion of Lens might be perhaps mostly dominated by the voluminous data from Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG)Lens is far more than the sum of it’s parts by combining open data from half a dozen open data sources.

The other significant thing about Lens that differentiates it from the other search discovery and citation indexes is that it is run by Cambia a non-profit that seems committed to produce a open, free to use alternative to commerically owned and licensed indexes….”

Open Access Button

“Free, legal research articles delivered instantly or automatically requested from authors….

Finding Available Research

Give us a scholarly paper and we’ll search thousands of sources with millions of articles to link you to free, legal, full text articles instantly.

Requesting Research

If we can’t get you access, we’ll start a request for you. We request articles from authors, and guide them on making the work available to you and everyone who needs it….”

Google and research data · Elephant in the Lab

“Therefore, we need better tools for data discovery. But I do not believe that Google Dataset Discovery is the right answer. It represents a proprietary and closed system on top of our own data. This is a system that benefits massively from researchers’ labour, but where researchers will have no say in. Google is capitalizing on a movement that they have contributed nothing to. Therefore, we need an open alternative. However, at the moment it seems to me that funders, research administrators and infrastructures are content to leave it to Google. This is highly problematic, especially since we have discussed the problems of lock-in effects and other negative outcomes of proprietary infrastructure for years now….”

DataCite Repository Selector

“Repository Finder, a pilot project of the Enabling FAIR Data Project led by the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in partnership with DataCite and the earth and space sciences community, can help you find an appropriate repository to deposit your research data. The tool is hosted by DataCite and queries the re3data registry of research data repositories….”