Free Inactive Patent Search — 100% Free Inactive Patent Information

“To find patents that have merely expired you can simply set your search terms to look for patents that are 20 years old or older. However, finding a list of inactive patents is far more challenging. This website overcomes that challenge as it allows you to search through all inactive patents in the U.S. that are less than 20 years old. We created this database to help drive open source hardware (OSH) development. Our previous work has found that patents should be significantly weakened as they are actively retarding innovation and technical progress. By properly valuing open hardware development it is clear that the return on investment for OSH development is enormous. In addition, proactive measures to defend the public domain can also provide more safe space for innovators to operate. Our hope is that this database accelerates your open hardware development.

For more information please see the article published in Inventions (2016): Open Source Database and Website to Provide Free and Open Access to Inactive U.S. Patents in the Public Domain. doi: 10.3390/inventions1040024 …”

The Open Commons of Phenomenology

“We are a non-profit, international scholarly association whose mission is to provide free access to the full corpus of phenomenology as well as to develop and maintain the digital infrastructure required for its curation, study and dissemination….A digital platform will host all texts, documents and images in open access, feature interactive contents and offer an extensive set of digital tools such as multi-text search, data visualisations, citation index, bibliometric statistics, annotations and social sharing….”

H2020 compliance of roarmap database

“This web site allows the comparison of any Open Access (OA) policy registered in ROARMAP database with the Horizon2020 funding program OA requirements.

Data are fetched directly from the ROARMAP web site and web API.

The criteria used to determine the level of compliance of a ROARMAP-classified policy with H2020 OA requirements have been documented in this document ….”

Getting serious about open access discovery – Is open access getting too big to ignore? | Musings about librarianship

“With all the intense interest Unpaywall is getting (See coverage in academic sites like Nature, ScienceChronicle of Higher education, as well as more mainstream tech sites like TechcruchGimzo), you might be surprised to know that Unpaywall isn’t in fact the first tool that promises to help users unlock paywalls by finding free versions.

Predecessors like Open Access button (3K users), Lazy Scholar button (7k Users), Google Scholar button (1.2 million users) all existed before Unpaywall(70k users) and are arguably every bit as capable as Unpaywall and yet remained a niche service for years.”

VizioMetrics

“Scientific results are communicated visually in the literature through diagrams, visualizations, and photographs. These information-dense objects have been largely ignored in bibliometrics and scientometrics studies when compared to citations and text. In this project, we use techniques from computer vision and machine learning to classify more than 8 million figures from PubMed into 5 figure types and study the resulting patterns of visual information as they relate to impact. We find that the distribution of figures and figure types in the literature has remained relatively constant over time, but can vary widely across field and topic. We find a significant correlation between scientific impact and the use of visual information, where higher impact papers tend to include more diagrams, and to a lesser extent more plots and photographs. To explore these results and other ways of extracting this visual information, we have built a visual browser to illustrate the concept and explore design alternatives for supporting viziometric analysis and organizing visual information. We use these results to articulate a new research agenda – viziometrics – to study the organization and presentation of visual information in the scientific literature….”