The Economic Logic of ‘Open Science’ and the Balance between Private Property Rights and the Public Domain in Scientific Data and Information: A Primer | SIEPR

“The progress of scientific and technological knowledge is a cumulative process, one that depends in the long?run on the rapid and widespread disclosure of new findings, so that they may be rapidly discarded if unreliable, or confirmed and brought into fruitful conjunction with other bodies of reliable knowledge. “Open science” institutions provide an alternative to the intellectual property approach to dealing with difficult problems in the allocation of resources for the production and distribution of information. As a mode of generating reliable knowledge, “open science” depends upon a specific non-market reward system to solve a number of resource allocation problems that have their origins in the particular characteristics of information as an economic good. There are features of the collegiate reputational reward system — conventionally associated with open science practice in the academy and public research institutes – that create conflicts been the ostensible norms of ‘cooperation’ and the incentives for non-cooperative, rivalrous behavior on the part of individuals and research units who race to establish “priority.” These sources of inefficiency notwithstanding, open science is properly regarded as uniquely well suited to the goal of maximising the rate of growth of the stock of reliable knowledge.

High access charges imposed by holders of monopoly rights in intellectual property have overall consequences for the conduct of science that are particularly damaging to programs of exploratory research which are recognized to be vital for the long-term progress of knowledge-driven economies….”

Open Science MOOC

“Welcome to the home of the Open Science MOOC! This website is aimed to provide information about our MOOC on Open Science principles and practices, its rational, the current state of the project, and the people behind it. This project was started in early 2017 after a barcamp at the Open Science Conference in Berlin. Soon, more than 30 people contributed and a first draft was made. Now in late summer 2017, already more than 100 volunteers have agreed to share their knowledge about Open Science and to contribute to what they see as an extremely important issue in nowadays and future science. Concomitantly, the European Commission published its report “Providing researchers with the skills and competencies they need to practise Open Science”, supporting the importance of the topic and thereby the necessity to explain, teach and support researchers to gain the necessary skills. We are excited by the support we got so far and we would like to invite everybody to create, comment, contribute and share! Just contact us.  “

OpenCon 2017 Lithuania: Towards Open Research Data and Open Science in Lithuania – Open Access Week

On the 23rd of October (Monday) the Library of Kaunas University of Technology, in collaboration with “OpenCon” and “OpenAIRE2020“, will host the conference ”OpenCon 2017 Lithuania: Towards Open Research Data and Open Science“. The aim of the event is to revise the national developments in terms of policy and practice both in Europe and Lithuania, open research data repository services, projects carried out and other open science oriented activities.“OpenCon 2017 Lithuania” is a satellite event of the annual OpenCon global conference.

La reforma europea del Copyright: La amenaza del Open Access y de la Open Science ~ CanalBiblos: blog de la Biblioteca de la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid

From Google translate:

The European Copyright Reform: The threat of Open Access and Open Science
The coalition, led by SPARC Europe (The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) and 15 other organizations representing the academic, library, research and digital rights communities have written an open letter to members of Parliament's Legal Affairs Committee European Parliament on the draft European Parliament Directive on Copyright in the Single Digital Market.

Understanding Open Science: Definitions and framework

Understanding Open Science: Definitions and framework

  1. 1. Understanding Open Science: Definitions and framework Dr. Nancy Pontika Open Access Aggregation Officer CORE Twitter: @nancypontika
  2. 2. What is Open Science
  3. 3. Research Lifecycle: as simple as it gets Idea Methodology Data Collection Analysis Publish
  4. 4. Idea Methodology Data Collection Analysis Publish Journal article, Dissertation, Book, Source Code, etc. Experiments, Interviews, Observations, etc. Numbers, Code, Text, Images, sound records, etc. Statistics, processes, analysis, documentation, etc. Research Lifecycle: focus on the steps”

The onward march of open science | The Horizons Tracker

“The increasingly open and transparent nature of academic research is something I’ve touched upon many times on this blog in recent years.  Further evidence of this general trend has emerged via the launch of MNI Open Research, a new platform for the publication of neuroscience research.

The platform aims to facilitate open and transparent peer-review, with all of the data used in the studies published, including null results, so that other researchers can avoid duplication, and also test the replicability of research.”

OpenAIRE – What is Open Access policy of the EC and the ERC?

“In Horizon 2020 Open Access to Scientific Peer Reviewed Publications has been anchored as an ‘underlying principle’, which means that it has become obligatory for all projects. Open access to scientific peer reviewed publications in Horizon 2020 The EC Guidelines on Open Access to Scientific Publications and Research Data in Horizon 2020 Version 3.1, 25 August 2016 Open Access Guidelines for research results funded by the ERC (revised December 2014) More information can be found in the ‘Regulation and the Rules of Participation’ as well as through the relevant provisions in the grant agreement (see Article 29 “Dissemination of results – Open Access – Visibility of EU funding”of the Multi-beneficiary General Model Grant Agreement, July 20, 2016, pp. 66-69) as well as exceptions for confidentiality (Article 36), security (Article 37), personal data (Article 39). A short summary : Factsheet on Open Access”

Principles and practice in open science: Addressing power and inequality through “situated openness” | OCSDNET

“OCSDNet’s Open and Collaborative Science Manifesto proposes a set of seven values and principles for a more inclusive and open science in development; Addressing the role of power and inequality in knowledge production is a key principle; Practicing “situated openness” can help to address the ways in which history, context, power and inequality condition scientific research; ‘Community-researcher contracts’ are a tool that can enable local communities, in particular, indigenous peoples, to negotiate with researchers about their participation in research processes and how their knowledge may (or may not) be accessed and shared.”