Open Science Training Handbook | FOSTER

“A group of fourteen authors came together in February 2018 at the TIB (German National Library of Science and Technology) in Hannover to create an open, living handbook on Open Science training. High-quality trainings are fundamental when aiming at a cultural change towards the implementation of Open Science principles. Teaching resources provide great support for Open Science instructors and trainers. The Open Science training handbook will be a key resource and a first step towards developing Open Access and Open Science curricula and andragogies. Supporting and connecting an emerging Open Science community that wishes to pass on their knowledge as multipliers, the handbook will enrich training activities and unlock the community’s full potential. The handbook is managed in this GitHub repository….”

GeoLog | How Open Science may help us during and after the pandemic – GeoLog

“We are three Earth Scientists who advocate for Open Science and our collaboration strengthened during the pandemic. In this difficult time, the benefits of Open Science and specifically open access to journal articles and the use of preprints were revealed to academia and the general public. These trends are encouraging and bode well for their greater use and development in a changing world. At this time, all researchers should have a sense of togetherness or Ubuntu, an African philosophy which is often translated as “I am, because we are”. The principles of Open Science uphold human rights and Ubuntu that enable researchers to interact and solve common problems. These same principles endorse transparency and collaboration, and, therefore, may have an important role so that researchers can remain productive during and after this pandemic.”

Digital Open Science Tools: How to Achieve more Openness Through an Inclusive Design | ZBW MediaTalk

:Through their responsive design, digital Open Science tools promise to enable and simplify collaboration across disciplines, world regions and language groups. But how inclusive are these tools actually globally? Global means that they are equally open in low and middle income countries. Louise Bezuidenhout and Jo Havemann have examined 242 Open Science tools in terms of their geolocalisation, conditions and financing models. They have identified their weaknesses in terms of geographical openness and are developing ideas on how to make the Open Science ecosystem even more inclusive and a truly “unlimited digital commons”….”

Zenodo – Research. Shared.

“Zenodo code is itself open source, and is built on the foundation of the Invenio digital library which is also open source. The work-in-progress, open issues, and roadmap are shared openly in GitHub, and contributions to any aspect are welcomed from anyone.

All meta data is openly available under CC0 licence, and all open content is openly accessible through open APIs.

Open to all suggestions for new features, via GitHub, and especially open to all contributions of code via pull requests!…”

Full article: Promoting scientific integrity through open science in health psychology: results of the Synergy Expert Meeting of the European health psychology society

Abstract:  The article describes a position statement and recommendations for actions that need to be taken to develop best practices for promoting scientific integrity through open science in health psychology endorsed at a Synergy Expert Group Meeting. Sixteen Synergy Meeting participants developed a set of recommendations for researchers, gatekeepers, and research end-users. The group process followed a nominal group technique and voting system to elicit and decide on the most relevant and topical issues. Seventeen priority areas were listed and voted on, 15 of them were recommended by the group. Specifically, the following priority actions for health psychology were endorsed: (1) for researchers: advancing when and how to make data open and accessible at various research stages and understanding researchers’ beliefs and attitudes regarding open data; (2) for educators: integrating open science in research curricula, e.g., through online open science training modules, promoting preregistration, transparent reporting, open data and applying open science as a learning tool; (3) for journal editors: providing an open science statement, and open data policies, including a minimal requirements submission checklist. Health psychology societies and journal editors should collaborate in order to develop a coordinated plan for research integrity and open science promotion across behavioural disciplines.

 

COAR, TCC Africa and AfricArXiv sign partnership agreement – AfricArXiv

“We are pleased to announce that the Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR) and TCC Africa in collaboration with AfricArXiv have signed a partnership agreement focused on strengthening capacity and infrastructure for Open Science in Africa. …

The aim of the partnership is to work together to foster the concept of bibliodiversity through information sharing, capacity building, and advocacy work, as well as enable AfricArXiv to engage with international peers in Africa and globally about best practices and next generation repository functionalities….”

Balancing’ privacy and open science in the context of COVID-19: a response to Ifenthaler & Schumacher (2016) | SpringerLink

Abstract:  Privacy and confidentiality are core considerations in education, while at the same time, using and sharing data—and, more broadly, open science—is increasingly valued by editors, funding agencies, and the public. This manuscript responds to an empirical investigation of students’ perceptions of the use of their data in learning analytics systems by Ifentahler and Schumacher (Educational Technology Research and Development, 64: 923-938, 2016). We summarize their work in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting shift to digital modes of teaching and learning by many teachers, using the tension between privacy and open science to frame our response. We offer informed recommendations for educational technology researchers in light of Ifentahler and Schumacher’s findings as well as strategies for navigating the tension between these important values. We conclude with a call for educational technology scholars to meet the challenge of studying learning (and disruptions to learning) in light of COVID-19 while protecting the privacy of students in ways that go beyond what Institutional Review Boards consider to be within their purview.