Canadian Open Neuroscience Platform (CONP) – A partnership with Brain Canada and Health Canada

“The Canadian Open Neuroscience Platform (CONP) aims to bring together many of the country’s leading scientists in basic and clinical neuroscience to form an interactive network of collaborations in brain research, interdisciplinary student training, international partnerships, clinical translation and open publishing. The platform will provide a unified interface to the research community and will propel Canadian neuroscience research  into a new era of open neuroscience research with the sharing of both data and methods,  the creation of large-scale databases, the development of standards for sharing, the facilitation of advanced analytic strategies, the open dissemination to the global community of both neuroscience data and methods, and the establishment of training programs for the next generation of computational neuroscience researchers. CONP aims to remove the technical barriers to practicing open science and improve the accessibility and reusability of neuroscience research to accelerate the pace of discovery….”

Help us improving the indicators!

“The Open Science Monitor tracks the development of open science trends in Europe.

Initially launched in 2017 to support the EU policies, the OSM has been revamped in May 2018 with updated data and visual identity. But open science is continuously developing, and over the next months, new trends, indicators, and data will be added. 

We need the input of the open science community to improve the indicators and identify new data sources, as illustrated in the methodological note (pdf). Below, you can comment on the individual indicators of the OSM. Your comments will help improve the Open Science Monitor….

This consultation will remain open for the full duration of the project, but in order to actually improve the methodology, the deadline for contribution is August 31st, 2018….”

Open science monitor | European Commission

“The Open Science Monitor aims to

  • provide data and insight to understand the development of open science in Europe
  • gather the most relevant and timely indicators on the development of open science in Europe and other global partner countries

The Open Science Monitor will also support European Commission initiatives such as the Open Science Policy Platform and the Open Science Cloud….

The Open Science Monitor will be updated on a regular basis in the course of the project, until the end of 2019. Over the next months, new indicators and data will be uploaded….

The Open Science Monitor is a collaborative effort and welcomes the contribution of the community. You can read the methodological note below, and provide your comments online on how to improve the specific indicators….

GDPR and the research process: What you need to know : OpenAIRE blog

“GDPR has a dual objective, protecting the data subject and, at the same time, increasing the free and lawful flow of data. By adhering to the GDPR principles, the research community is able to ensure maximum protection of personal data while maximizing the potential of opening research to the world.”

The unacknowledged convergence of open source, open access, and open science | Willinsky | First Monday

Abstract:  A number of open initiatives are actively resisting the extension of intellectual property rights. Among these developments, three prominent instances — open source software, open access to research and scholarship, and open science — share not only a commitment to the unrestricted exchange of information and ideas, but economic principles based on (1) the efficacy of free software and research; (2) the reputation–building afforded by public access and patronage; and, (3) the emergence of a free–or–subscribe access model. Still, with this much in common, the strong sense of convergence among these open initiatives has yet to be fully realized, to the detriment of the larger, common issue. By drawing on David’s (2004; 2003; 2000; 1998) economic work on open science and Weber’s (2004) analysis of open source, this paper seeks to make that convergence all the more apparent, as well as worth pursuing, by those interested in furthering this alternative approach, which would treat intellectual properties as public goods.

Open Science Grid | A national, distributed computing partnership for data-intensive research

“The OSG provides common service and support for resource providers and scientific institutions using a distributed fabric of high throughput computational services. The OSG does not own resources but provides software and services to users and resource providers alike to enable the opportunistic usage and sharing of resources. The OSG is jointly funded by the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. here for a two-page printable overview of OSG….”

APA Creates Open Science and Methodology Chair to Deepen Commitment to Data Sharing, Transparency in Science

“The American Psychological Association has created an open science and methodology chair to work with its authors, reviewers, editors and publications board to understand and develop best practices for the evolving landscape of open science in psychological research. “APA is committed to promoting transparency and sound practice in psychological research,” said Rose Sokol-Chang, PhD, APA’s journals publisher. “We are enthusiastic about offering the psychology community another resource to bolster this work.” APA’s Publications and Communications Board approved the post and will issue an open call to recruit for it in early summer. The chair will initially work with a committee to help refine and extend the P&C Board policy for APA journals related to open science practices. APA Journals is committed to publishing transparent research, publishing replications and offering resources such as its Journal Article Reporting Standards for quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods research design; open science badges; and an APA Journals data repository, in conjunction with the Center for Open Science. “APA recognizes the importance of sharing data to aid secondary discovery, increase efficiency in research discoveries and improve reproducibility in science,” said Sokol-Chang. Qualifications for the post are experience in open science practices, including data sharing, reproducibility and preregistration; editorial experience and familiarity with APA journals policy; experience with data management, research methodology and clinical trials; and having served on an institutional review board. Interested applicants can read more about the position online or by email. APA is the world’s largest nonprofit publisher of psychological science, setting standards for scholarship in the field. APA Publishing produces journals, books, videos, databases and educational products for researchers, practitioners, educators, students and the public. “

OpenResearch

“This semantic wiki at OpenResearch aims at making the world of science more visible and accessible. Information about scientific events, research projects, publishers, journals etc. is scattered around on the Web. For researchers (especially young ones without decades of experience) it is often difficult to find the relevant venues, people or tools. Also research is increasingly dynamic and multi-disciplinary, so the boundaries between communities blur and new research directions emerge. With this semantic Wiki, we aim to make information about scientific events, research groups, tools, journals etc. more accessible. OpenResearch is not restricted to any field of science….”

EUREKA by ScienceMatters

“EUREKA is a scientific review and rating platform fuelled by the EUREKA token. Blockchain has the capacity to open science and make research findings immutable, transparent and decentralised. EUREKA revolutionises the scientific publishing and reviewing process by making it more efficient and fair using the EUREKA token to compensate all parties involved. Scientific discoveries can now be openly rated and rewarded based on the quality of the research….

Scientific observations are timestamped, hashed and recorded on the Ethereum blockchain. This gives the author or inventor immediate ownership rights, and ensures scientists’ and researchers’ discoveries are tamper-proof….

Scientific observations undergo crowdsourced, peer-to-peer reviews which are transmitted and recorded on the EUREKA platform. The EUREKA platform will make use of crowdsourced wisdom and reviewers to get fast, accurate evaluations of the work, instead of being restricted to one or two reviewers, as is common practice….

The EUREKA platform’s crowdsourced scoring of scientific work will provide researchers as well as publishers with a new metric that can be used to evaluate submissions more swiftly. Preprints or observations with ratings and reviews will be archived through the EUREKA decentralised and distributed system. In cases where the author wants to publish in a traditional journal, the scores can be transferred to the journals. The test scores are also available to funders, universities and prize or awards committees….”