Research policy monitoring in the era of Open Science and Big Data – The what (indicators) and the how (infrastructures) | Thematic workshops

A two day workshop exploring mechanisms for research policy monitoring and indicators: discussing the what ‘indicators’ and the how: infrastructure. This workshop is in collaboration with Data4Impact, with support of Science Europe….”

OpenPlanetary Townhall on Open Science

“The paradigm of Open Science is based on the tiers Open Access, Open Data and Free Open Source Software (FOSS). However, the interconnections between the tiers remain to be improved. This is a critical factor to enable Open Science. This Townhall meeting reaches out all across EGU, espescially welcoming Early Career Scientists, to network and discuss the current challenges and opportunities…”

Open Science in Africa | Elephant in the Lab

Open Science is becoming increasingly popular globally and provides unprecedented opportunities for scientists in Africa, South East Asia, and Latin America. African scientists face several difficulties when attempting to get their work published in peer-reviewed journals  – there is a small number of publication platforms, a lack of knowledge and access difficulties related to existing journals (whose visibility on the web is not very good) (Piron et al., 2017). There are also obstacles related to the functioning of the journals themselves ( notably the duration of the revision process and the cost of publications)  and the result is that science and scholarly publishing are often perceived as a prerogative of the Northern countries. The methods and techniques (including the peer-review process) that are being developed for its dissemination are not necessarily adapted to the contexts of other regions of the world, including Africa. Indeed, many African-based peer-reviewed scholarly journals are unable to host their content online due to resource limitations and the digital divide (Agaba et al., 2004).

In this article, we provide an overview of the most important initiatives and actors in the Open Science movement in Africa. We further identify three major challenges for Open Science on the African continent and offer perspectives for African researchers to actively contribute to the global scientific community and share knowledge to meet the challenges we all face….”

One Mind Announces Request for Proposals for Five New $250,000 Rising Star Research Awards

“Given the growing challenges of addressing brain illness and injury, One Mind, in collaboration with Janssen Research & Development LLC, Otsuka Pharmaceuticals, Kaiser Permanente, the Gifford Foundation, and Bettina Bryant, is offering up to five Rising Star Research Awards in 2019. In collaboration with Inscopix, One Mind is also offering up to three supplemental technology grants, each in support of one Rising Star Research Award.

The goal of the Rising Star Research Awards is to recognize and fund promising, early career investigators through a competitive grants process to accelerate research on major neuropsychiatric disorders. Chosen by One Mind’s Scientific Advisory Board, each Rising Star Award recipient will receive up to $250,000 to fund research for their studies….

ONE MIND’s vision is healthy brains for all. Fueled by a belief in open science principles and creating global public-private partnerships, ONE MIND’s mission is to radically accelerate cures for brain illnesses and injuries by funding and fostering scientific collaborations and initiatives. …”

Open Science in Perspective Symposium: Early Career Researcher Edition | River Campus Libraries

Hear directly from early career researchers engaged in research that sheds light on how the open movement is perceived among students and faculty. Throughout this symposium, up-and-coming scholars will discuss about how to improve the conversation around open innitiatives, clarify misconceptions, and inform the ways we teach open practices in the classroom….”

Open Science in Action Symposium: Early Career Researcher Edition | River Campus Libraries

Hear direclty from early career researchers engaged in practices that make their work more open and transparent. Throughout this symposium up-and-coming scholars will discuss how they are using open tools and workflows to systematically track their research decisions over time, to engage in new kinds of peer review process that are not contingent on study findings, and to offer hands-on training on open science practices in the classroom….”

Open Science in Dinosaur Paleontology

Abstract:  Research is in the midst of a period of global terraform, usually heralded under the banner of ‘Open Science’. Open Science is a response from communities to an increasingly digital ecosystem, enabling new practices to emerge. Three of the major pillars of Open Science include Open Access, Open Data, and Open Source. The global paleontological community is slowly adapting to each of these as part of its culture, raising new questions around scientific practices, data standards and interoperability, and the role of paleontological research in a modern society. This chapter discusses some of the progress that the paleontological community has made in shifting towards open practices, and considers some potential avenues for the future of the field.

Open Science in Dinosaur Paleontology

Abstract:  Research is in the midst of a period of global terraform, usually heralded under the banner of ‘Open Science’. Open Science is a response from communities to an increasingly digital ecosystem, enabling new practices to emerge. Three of the major pillars of Open Science include Open Access, Open Data, and Open Source. The global paleontological community is slowly adapting to each of these as part of its culture, raising new questions around scientific practices, data standards and interoperability, and the role of paleontological research in a modern society. This chapter discusses some of the progress that the paleontological community has made in shifting towards open practices, and considers some potential avenues for the future of the field.

Meet Mozilla’s Latest Open Science Awardees

Today, we’re announcing our latest Mozilla Science Mini Grant awardees: eight projects from six different countries that merge open-source values with scientific research.

Among the projects receiving funds: a community-owned publishing platform for research. A three-day hackathon for scientists in the life sciences, and open-source protocols for analyzing the yeast DNA in beer.

These grants are part of Mozilla’s larger Fellowships and Awards work. They are made possible by The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust….”