OSF | Badges to Acknowledge Open Practices

“There is no central authority determining the validity of scientific claims. Accumulation of scientific knowledge proceeds via open communication with the community. Sharing evidence for scientific claims facilitates critique, extension, and application. Despite the importance of open communication for scientific progress, present norms do not provide strong incentives for individual researchers to share data, materials, or their research process. Journals can provide such incentives by acknowledging open practices with badges in publications….”

Open Science Badges

“What are Open Science Badges?

Badges to acknowledge open science practices are incentives for researchers to share data, materials, or to preregister.

Badges signal to the reader that the content has been made available and certify its accessibility in a persistent location….

 

Badges seem silly. Do they work?

Yes. Implementing these badges dramatically increases the rate of data sharing (Kidwell et al, 2016).

A recent systematic review identified this badging program as the only evidence-based incentive program that this effective at increasing the rates of data sharing (Rowhani-Farid et al., 2017).

View a list of journals and organizations that have adopted badges here….”

G7 Science Ministers’ Communiqué, September 28, 2017

“16. We affirm the principle that efforts should be directed to promote a widespread participation of researchers in the network of global research infrastructures, taking account of the opportunities offered by open science paradigms. Significant contributions to this discussion come from the “Group of Senior Officials on Global Research Infrastructures” (GSO) and the G7 “Open Science Working Group” (OS WG)….[18] We welcome the GSO’s 2017 report that includes both the evolution of the Framework corresponding to a broader and deeper consensus on global access criteria, the developments on open innovation and open data policies….19. We recognize that ICT developments, the digitisation and the vast availability of data, efforts to push the science frontiers, and the need to address complex economic and societal challenges, are transforming the way in which science is performed towards Open Science paradigms. We agree that an international approach can help the speed and coherence of this transition, and that it should target in particular two aspects. First, the incentives for the openness of the research ecosystem: the evaluation of research careers should better recognize and reward Open Science activities. Secondly, the infrastructures for an optimal use of research data: all researchers should be able to deposit, access and analyse scientific data across disciplines and at the global scale, and research data should adhere to the FAIR principles of being findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable….20. We support the work and results achieved so far by the G7 Open Science Working group. The OS Working Group has identified priorities that deserve and require common aligned actions, both in encouraging openness and data skills in scientific research practice, through workforce development and training. We encourage the OS WG to follow-up actions taken by G7 members according to the WG’s recommendations and to collect good practices, in order to report to the next G7 Science Minister’s Meeting. In particular, we support the OS WG deepening its efforts on the two topics identified above (paragraph 19), namely the incentives for openness of the research ecosystem, including the role of research indicators and metrics relevant to open science, and the infrastructures and standards for optimal use of research. The summary report of the OS working group is attached to this Communiqué….”

Preliminary Findings: Rent Seeking by Elsevier – The Knowledge G.A.P.

Over the last few decades, there has been ongoing debate and distress regarding the effects of the journal subscription paywall and the very real barriers to knowledge access that it creates. As major academic publishers invest and redirect their business strategies to open access and alternative paying structures, it may seem as if the access to knowledge battle is starting to be won. However, as big publishers move towards openness they have also been redirecting their business strategies towards the acquisition of scholarly infrastructure, the tools and services that underpin the scholarly research life cycle, many of which are geared towards data analytics. We argue that moves toward increased control over openness and data analytics by big publishers are simultaneous processes of profit maximization. Could it be that our attention on the paywall has ditracted us from paying attention to the strategic takeover of infrastructure by the publishers? These processes should be examined closely as they are actively entrenching the publisher’s’ power and control which could be posing great threats to the exclusion of already marginalized researchers and institutions.   

Libraries, Universities Unite to Push for Open Access – ECS

Over the summer, librarians and academic leaders in Germany came together to lead a push in taking down the paywalls that block access to so many scientific research articles. The initiative, named Projekt DEAL, represents a bold push toward open access that could change the landscape of academic publishing.

The latest developments in Projekt DEAL pick up on a battle now over two years in the making, where libraries and universities in Germany have united in pushing large publishers to adopt a new business model. The institutions are looking to forego the typical subscription-based academic publishing business model in lieu of paying an annual lump sum that covers publications costs of all papers whose first authors are associated with German institutions.”

International Association of STM Publishers

“In 2003, PLOS published its first research article and this month we’re proud to announce that we have now published more than 200,000 research articles across our seven Open Access journals. It has been an amazing journey to reach this milestone….”

To extend neighbouring right for press publishers to scholarly publications would be a disaster for open science [interview] | DataScouting

“On the occasion of the proposed EU Copyright reform, which is currently undergoing a process in the European Parliament, representatives from three leading European libraries are asking Julia Reda, Member of the European Parliament with the Pirate Party about the challenges and the impact that the proposed copyright directive will have on libraries, institutional repositories, open science and more.”

rOpenSci – Open Tools for Open Science

“At rOpenSci we are creating packages that allow access to data repositories through the R statistical programming environment that is already a familiar part of the workflow of many scientists. Our tools not only facilitate drawing data into an environment where it can readily be manipulated, but also one in which those analyses and methods can be easily shared, replicated, and extended by other researchers….We develop open source R packages that provide programmatic access to a variety of scientific data, full-text of journal articles, and repositories that provide real-time metrics of scholarly impact. …Use our packages to acquire data (both your own and from various data sources), analyze it, add in your narrative, and generate a final publication in any one of widely used formats such as Word, PDF, or LaTeX. Combine our tools with the rich ecosystem of existing R packages….”

Open Source Alliance for Open Scholarship – open source, community-led projects working together for open scholarship

“We are an alliance of open source projects that value sharing and collaboration. Rather than remaining siloed, our projects/organizations have committed to share resources, learn from each other, and work together to create a new open source infrastructure for science – one that is modular, flexible, and reusable….”