CrowdTangle opens public application for academics – Facebook Research

“Supporting independent research through data access, training, and resources is critical to understanding the spread of public content across social media and to providing transparency into Facebook’s platforms. That’s why we’re excited to announce that CrowdTangle has now opened a public application for university-based researchers and academics.

CrowdTangle is a public insights tool from Facebook that makes it easy to follow, analyze, and report on what’s happening across social media. CrowdTangle started a pilot program in 2019 to partner with researchers and academics and help them study critical topics such as racial justice, misinformation, and elections. In addition to launching an online application, we’ve built a new hub with information about all Facebook data sets that are available for independent research….”

Why not use “Twitter” of core clinical journals for rapid dissemination of medical information during the COVID-19 pandemic? | SpringerLink

“We have informed the residents at our institution to share information from well-known scientific journals, such as New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Journal of the American Medical Association, British Medical Journal, American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology on Twitter. In this way, residents can not only obtain information on COVID-19, but also benefit from discussions on the latest medical advances and learn more general information in the field….”

Why not use “Twitter” of core clinical journals for rapid dissemination of medical information during the COVID-19 pandemic? | SpringerLink

“We have informed the residents at our institution to share information from well-known scientific journals, such as New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Journal of the American Medical Association, British Medical Journal, American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology on Twitter. In this way, residents can not only obtain information on COVID-19, but also benefit from discussions on the latest medical advances and learn more general information in the field….”

Trends of Publications’ Citations and Altmetrics Based on Open Access Types | Proceedings of the ACM/IEEE Joint Conference on Digital Libraries in 2020

This paper analyzes trends of citation and altmetrics with respect to different OA types (e.g., gold, hybrid, green). The analysis based on Unpaywall, Altmetric, and COCI shows that articles with a green license obtain more citations than other OA types. Regarding patents, hybrid, green, and bronze articles get more mentions compared to closed and gold articles. In terms of social media (e.g., Twitter and Facebook), bronze articles receive the most mentions.

Trends of Publications’ Citations and Altmetrics Based on Open Access Types | Proceedings of the ACM/IEEE Joint Conference on Digital Libraries in 2020

This paper analyzes trends of citation and altmetrics with respect to different OA types (e.g., gold, hybrid, green). The analysis based on Unpaywall, Altmetric, and COCI shows that articles with a green license obtain more citations than other OA types. Regarding patents, hybrid, green, and bronze articles get more mentions compared to closed and gold articles. In terms of social media (e.g., Twitter and Facebook), bronze articles receive the most mentions.

Towards a National Collection | Collections United

“Funded by UKRI’s Arts and Humanities Research Council, Towards a National Collection is supporting research that breaks down the barriers that exist between the UK’s outstanding cultural heritage collections, with the aim of opening them up to new research opportunities and encouraging the public to explore them in new ways….

Collections United is a social media campaign connecting and highlighting the rich and diverse range of cultural heritage collections across the UK. The aim is to bring together material from more than one collection, telling the stories that connect them, and encouraging the public to do the same….”

A global questionnaire survey of the scholarly communication attitudes and behaviours of early career researchers – Nicholas – 2020 – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  This article describes an international study informed by a 3?year?long qualitative longitudinal project, which sought to discover the scholarly communication attitudes and behaviour of early career researchers (ECRs). Using a combination of small?scale interviews and a larger?scale survey, ECRs were questioned on their searching and reading behaviour, publishing practices, open data, and their use of social media. Questionnaire invitations were sent out via publisher lists, social media networks, university research networks, and specialist ECR membership organizations. One?thousand and six?hundred responses were received, with many coming from China, Russia, and Poland. Results showed that ECRs are adopting millennial?facing tools/platforms, with Google, Google Scholar, social media, and smartphones becoming embedded in their scholarly activities. Open data sharing obtains widespread support but somewhat less practice. There are some differences in attitudes and behaviour according to age and subject specialism.

 

In the open: TXTmob and Twitter · Commonplace

“For our first case study, we will look into the collaborative roots of Twitter in the open source code of TXTmob. We foreground this retrospective glance with an original account of its creation by TXTmob founder Tad Hirsch and an excerpt from Sasha Costanza-Chock’s Design Justice (The MIT Press, 2020), which you can purchase here, or read the OA edition here….” 

Does Tweeting Improve Citations? One-Year Results from the TSSMN Prospective Randomized Trial – ScienceDirect

Abstract:  Background

The Thoracic Surgery Social Media Network (TSSMN) is a collaborative effort of leading journals in cardiothoracic surgery to highlight publications via social media. This study aims to evaluate the 1-year results of a prospective randomized social media trial to determine the effect of tweeting on subsequent citations and non-traditional bibliometrics.

Methods

A total of 112 representative original articles were randomized 1:1 to be tweeted via TSSMN or a control (non-tweeted) group. Measured endpoints included citations at 1-year compared to baseline, as well as article-level metrics (Altmetric score) and Twitter analytics. Independent predictors of citations were identified through univariable and multivariable regression analyses.

Results

When compared to control articles, tweeted articles achieved significantly greater increase in Altmetric scores (Tweeted 9.4±5.8 vs. Non-Tweeted 1.0±1.8, p<0.001), Altmetric score percentiles relative to articles of similar age from each respective journal (Tweeted 76.0±9.1%ile vs. Non-Tweeted 13.8±22.7%ile, p<0.001), with greater change in citations at 1 year (Tweeted +3.1±2.4 vs. Non-Tweeted +0.7±1.3, p<0.001). Multivariable analysis showed that independent predictors of citations were randomization to tweeting (OR 9.50; 95%CI 3.30-27.35, p<0.001), Altmetric score (OR 1.32; 95%CI 1.15-1.50, p<0.001), open-access status (OR 1.56; 95%CI 1.21-1.78, p<0.001), and exposure to a larger number of Twitter followers as quantified by impressions (OR 1.30, 95%CI 1.10-1.49, p<0.001).

Conclusions

One-year follow-up of this TSSMN prospective randomized trial importantly demonstrates that tweeting results in significantly more article citations over time, highlighting the durable scholarly impact of social media activity.