Open Knowledge Finland to produce report on the openness of key scientific publishers

“To round off a great Open Access  week, we’d like to announce a new interesting project we’ve started. Continuing our efforts in the field of Open Science, Open Knowledge Finland was commissioned by CSC – IT Center for Science and the Finnish Ministry of Education and Culture to implement a Study on the Openness of Scientific Publishers.”

Open access week: ResearchGate and the violation of copyright agreements | Times Higher Education (THE)

“I have been warning junior and senior researchers for the past four years, when promoting open access publishing, that sites such as ResearchGate and Academia.edu and the like should not be considered repositories – and that most of the content offered on these platforms is in violation of copyright agreements.”

Still true: 70% of peer-reviewed OA journals charge no APCs

“Every study since the first in 2005 has shown that a significant majority of peer-reviewed journals charge no APCs. Most have put that majority at about 70%.

I just looked up today’s numbers at the Directory of Open Access Journals, and the number is still 70%.

Total number of journals listed in DOAJ = 10,279 

No-fee = 7,193 = 69.97%

Fee-based = 2,980 = 28.99%

No info = 106 = 1.03% …”

Be Bold, Go for Gold! | PLOS Biologue

“From the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI) meeting in 2002 to the present day, Open Access has come a long way, and this week we celebrate the 10th annual Open Access Week! This year’s focus spearheaded by SPARC is around “Open in order to…“ with the goal of highlighting the benefits of Open Access. PLOS has published another post on our efforts for Open Access Week, and so here it seems a good time to consider the nuances of the various flavours (colours) of Open Access available to researchers today and what they are Open in order to achieve.”

Open Access Books: Open Access in order to…? – SpringerOpen blog

“This week is Open Access Week, a global event that encourages the discussion of open access (OA) amongst researchers and the scholarly community. This year’s theme for OA Week asks the question, ‘Open access in order to…?’ Whilst OA is more established for journal publishing, it is still relatively new for academic books. So, from a publisher’s perspective, why does Springer Nature offer an OA option for book authors? We have been publishing OA books and chapters under our SpringerOpen and Palgrave Macmillan imprints since 2011 and just this week published our 400th OA book. We asked some of our OA books team and editors about what OA means to them.”

Open access: A global movement – Open Access Week

“The open access (OA) movement is gaining worldwide consensus as more and more countries are joining the effort to make research freely available.  China has recently joined the ranks of the nations that are making a shift to OA. On May 15, 2014, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), a major basic-science funding agency, and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), one of China’s most prestigious research institutions, announced that researchers associated with these institutions would need to give u…. Interestingly, more research-funding agencies in China are expected to follow a similar policy. While OA has been gradually gaining support in China in the past few years, this move might bring a major change to academia in China. The research output of China has multiplied over the years—the country’s contribution to the total global articles has increased from 5.6% in 2003 to 13.9% in 2012, according to the data calculated using the Science Citation Index (…—and thus, the most significant upshot of this move to OA is that a wealth of scientific knowledge would become available to the world. However, a downside is that while studies in the natural sciences will gain public access, the humanities will not benefit from this newly declared policy. Nevertheless, in the wake of the OA movement, China is making new forays, one of which is a growing interest in partnerships to start new OA journals as reported in BioMed Central.”

Finding Open Access Scholarly Research | HR Hub

“Are you part of a non-profit organization, but don’t have access to University research and resources? This workshop will focus on ways non-University affiliated community researchers can still access excellent scholarly articles & research, so you don’t have to beg, steal, or borrow to get the evidence you need. Beyond the paywall is freedom! All Are Welcome! We’ll cover: What is Open Access, and can you trust it? Places to find high quality, legal, scholarly research – beyond Google Simple search strategies to get better results Resources for grant writing…”

OpenCon 2017 Lithuania: Towards Open Research Data and Open Science in Lithuania – Open Access Week

On the 23rd of October (Monday) the Library of Kaunas University of Technology, in collaboration with “OpenCon” and “OpenAIRE2020“, will host the conference ”OpenCon 2017 Lithuania: Towards Open Research Data and Open Science“. The aim of the event is to revise the national developments in terms of policy and practice both in Europe and Lithuania, open research data repository services, projects carried out and other open science oriented activities.“OpenCon 2017 Lithuania” is a satellite event of the annual OpenCon global conference.

Part 2: How big was OA Week this year? How comprehensive is the OAD? The Ope…

“The Open Access Directory (+OAD, @oad) is an #openaccess encyclopedia of open access. Among other things, it tracks OA-related conferences and workshops. For October 2016, it captured 411 events, reflecting the surge of global activity surrounding this year’s OA Week.

http://oad.simmons.edu/oadwiki/2016#October …”