5 games for promoting open access | Musings about librarianship

Sure you could organize talks to promote open access but why not switch it up and try to educate users with a fun interactive game?

Creating a good game is not easy, but fortunately libraries around the world have done amazing work in designing some games around open access and in the spirit of openness  have made them open that you can consider using….”

5 games for promoting open access | Musings about librarianship

Sure you could organize talks to promote open access but why not switch it up and try to educate users with a fun interactive game?

Creating a good game is not easy, but fortunately libraries around the world have done amazing work in designing some games around open access and in the spirit of openness  have made them open that you can consider using….”

Sustainable Open Access and Impact: Celebrating OA Week | Policy Press Blog

We [Bristol Universityh Press] offer a range of flexible open access options for both journals and book publishing which continue to evolve, and we are always interested in working with our authors to explore new ideas.

Both Green and Gold options are available for all our journal and book content and we are flexible to allow for funder compliance. See our open access options for books and open access options for journals for more information.

For journals our OA content is available to access on our IngentaConnect platform where it is clearly signposted.

For books we make our OA content available via OAPEN and JSTOR and we are delighted to be a part of the Knowledge Unlatched collections which are funded by libraries.

We offer discounts on our standard APCs to researchers in developing countries and to those in institutions who subscribe to our journal collections….”

Open Access Week: CUP moves four journals to gold OA | Research Information

“Cambridge University Press is moving four more of its journals from a traditional subscription model to gold open access in  what it describes as ‘a further demonstration of its commitment to the development of a sustainable, more open future for academic publishing’….”

Plan S will bring many changes, but the death of the repository should not be one | Jisc scholarly communications

“On the eve of Open Access Week, Bill Hubbard argues that we must not forget university repositories as the bedrock of open research….

Science Europe’s Plan S has been viewed as a somewhat revolutionary move after years of frustration at the rate of progress in open access. At Jisc, our response to the announcement was a positive one – we need to remove hurdles for the research community and engage the public in the groundbreaking, publicly funded work that takes place at our universities.

We are particularly pleased that the national research funding organisations signing up to Plan S have focused on establishing robust criteria for high-quality OA journals and platforms, support for OA infrastructure and monitoring compliance. These have been areas of Jisc’s work for some time.

We should note that a vital part of the infrastructure is in place. The global repository network, which has been painstakingly built over the past 15 years, has become a staggeringly bountiful source of freely available research.

The discovery service Core shows more than 11 million full-text articles from repositories and elsewhere. Plan S will give these a dramatic boost….”

 

How we’ve been designing equitable foundations for open knowledge | Jisc

“We pride ourselves on supporting the research community, and our service that we run with the Open University, “CORE”, does just that. CORE is a fantastic service that collates open access content from worldwide repositories and journals; facilitating free, unrestricted access to research for all.  Efficient, comprehensive, and effective discovery is at the heart of making open access materials inclusive and equitable, serving the needs of users all around the world.

CORE can get information out to schools, colleges, universities, and developing countries that don’t have as many resources, and, in fact, absolutely any institution in need of content and information. As of May 2018, CORE has aggregated over 131 million article metadata records, 93 million abstracts, 11 million hosted and validated full texts and over 78 million direct links to research papers hosted on other websites….

We know the world of OA can be complicated and a bit daunting, so we provide plenty of free guides on open access, from the open access good practice handbook, to advice on how to manage your open access costs and managing research data in your organisation….

Of course, we provide the Janet Network, the UK’s world-class research and education network. Moreover though, we pride ourselves on our services that help organisations and researchers alike to source the information they need to do their jobs well.

Open systems to support open access use need efficient infrastructure services for holding, preserving, curating, and providing access to information.

For example, our research shared data service (RDSS) will allow researchers to easily deposit data for publication, discovery, safe storage, archiving and preservation. This means that they are able to provide easy and open access to research data so it can be re-used….”

Open Access Week at Harvard Library 2018 | Communications

“In celebration of OA Week, the Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communicationwill share some great news about OA and the Harvard Community: 

  • The OSC will launch a new OA policy for staff, researchers, and scholars to use open-access licensing
  • we will share our annual statistics from around the world, highlighting Harvard’s scholarship’s impact
  • reveal the new and improved Harvard open-access repository, DASH (Digital Access to Scholarship at Harvard).

In addition, the Harvard Library OSC and the Research Data Management Programare teaming up to co-sponsor a series of events during OA week, including an open-access open house, interactive workshops on ORCID, reproducibility, Dataverse, and more. See the schedule for more details….”

Impact of Social Sciences – Do we need to “fail fast” to achieve open access?

“Progress to open access has stalled. After two decades of trying, the proportion of born-free articles is stuck at 20%. Kicking off the Impact Blog’s Open Access Week coverage, Toby Green suggests the solution to our financially unsustainable scholarly publishing system may lie in rethinking traditional processes using internet-era norms. Embracing the principle of “fail fast”, all papers should first be published as freely available preprints to test whether they “succeed” or “fail”, with journals then competing to invite authors to publish. This would reduce the costs of the expensive, straining peer review system while ensuring all papers are available to all readers….”

Member Collaborations Blossom in OASPA – OASPA

“OASPA has seen an exciting recent blossoming of inter-membership collaborations, partnerships, and instances of members working alongside each other in support of common goals. In honour of Open Access Week, which celebrates the global open access community annually and runs from October 22-28th this year, we are highlighting these inspiring instances of collaborative efforts of our members in their work to find new solutions to making research openly accessible for all….”