Harvard DART – Digital Assets for Reuse in Teaching

“Since 2012, HarvardX has developed over 35,000 learning assets for the edX platform, yet the use of these resources on-campus has been limited to small specialized experiments. A contributing factor to this limited use is that edX educational assets are only accessible behind the firewall of an edX registration page. MOOC learners, course staff, and faculty leads must all register for a course in order to even simply browse resources. Allen & Seaman (2016) indicate that two of the most cited obstacles to adoption of open educational resources by university faculty in the U.S. are the difficulty of finding high quality resources and the lack of comprehensive catalogue of resources….”

‘Inclusive access’ takes off as model for college textbook sales

Major education publishers — including Pearson, Cengage and McGraw-Hill Education — report that the number of colleges offering “inclusive-access” programs has grown rapidly in recent years. Where previously students might have been assigned textbooks individually, now many institutions are signing up whole classes of students to automatically receive digital course materials at a discounted rate, rather than purchasing individually. The “inclusive” aspect of the model means that every student has the same materials on the first day of class, with the charge included as part of their tuition. For publishers with struggling print businesses, the inclusive-access model is a lifeline. Tim Peyton, vice president of strategic partnerships at Pearson, said it was no secret that publishers like Pearson had made textbooks too expensive and had seen sales drop as a result. “The print model is really a broken business model for us,” he said, adding, “we’re thinking about how to move away from print, and move towards digital.”

Open Science MOOC

“Welcome to the home of the Open Science MOOC! This website is aimed to provide information about our MOOC on Open Science principles and practices, its rational, the current state of the project, and the people behind it. This project was started in early 2017 after a barcamp at the Open Science Conference in Berlin. Soon, more than 30 people contributed and a first draft was made. Now in late summer 2017, already more than 100 volunteers have agreed to share their knowledge about Open Science and to contribute to what they see as an extremely important issue in nowadays and future science. Concomitantly, the European Commission published its report “Providing researchers with the skills and competencies they need to practise Open Science”, supporting the importance of the topic and thereby the necessity to explain, teach and support researchers to gain the necessary skills. We are excited by the support we got so far and we would like to invite everybody to create, comment, contribute and share! Just contact us.  “

onthewards | a free open access medical education website

“onthewards is a free open access medical education website dedicated to creating resources for the doctors of today and tomorrow. Our educational topics are selected by junior doctors for junior doctors.

We release a podcast (onthepods) each week that can be listened to directly from the website, downloaded through our app or streamed via iTunes or your favourite podcast service. Each podcast also includes a summary of the content, written by a junior doctor….”

Stakeholders validate national policy on open education resources — Features — The Guardian Nigeria Newspaper – Nigeria and World News

“For the first time in the history of higher education in  the country, a draft national policy on Open Education Resources (OER) has been validated to address the dearth of learning resources in quality, quantity and currency in the subsector.”

OpenupEd

“OpenupEd is the first, and, thus far, the only pan-European MOOC initiative. It was launched in April 2013 by EADTU, and communicated in collaboration with the European Commission (European Commission, 2013b). The 11 launch partners are based in eight EU countries (France, Italy, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, and the UK), as well as in three countries outside the EU (Russia, Turkey, and Israel).

While OpenupEd emerged in Europe, its mission has a global relevance and scope, thereby widening the spectrum of diversity. We promote the creation of similar initiatives (‘OpenupEd alikes’) in other regions around the world. Together with UNESCO we are collaborating with our sister organisations in Africa and in Asia (see associate partner section)….”

Open Content and Open Educational Resources: Enabling universal education | Caswell | The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning

Abstract:  The role of distance education is shifting. Traditionally distance education was limited in the number of people served because of production, reproduction, and distribution costs. Today, while it still costs the university time and money to produce a course, technology has made it such that reproduction costs are almost non-existent. This shift has significant implications, and allows distance educators to play an important role in the fulfillment of the promise of the right to universal education. At little or no cost, universities can make their content available to millions. This content has the potential to substantially improve the quality of life of learners around the world. New distance education technologies, such as OpenCourseWares, act as enablers to achieving the universal right to education. These technologies, and the associated changes in the cost of providing access to education, change distance education’s role from one of classroom alternative to one of social transformer.

Backchannels | What a new university in Africa is doing to decolonise social sciences | Society for Social Studies of Science

“#1: By 2019, everything we assign our students will be open source

Like most institutions of higher education in Africa (and across much of the world) ALU’s library is limited. Students often deal with this by flouting copyright and piracy laws and illegally downloading material. We don’t want to train our students to become habitual law breakers. Nor do we want them to accept second-tier access to commodified knowledge.

Our aspiration is that by 2019 everything we assign in our programme will be open source. This will be achieved by building relationships with publishers, writers and industry leaders, and negotiating partnerships for equitable access to knowledge. This will ensure that a new generation of thinkers is equipped with the analytic tools they need.

It will also move towards undoing centuries of knowledge extraction from Africa to the world that has too often taken place with little benefit to the continent itself….”