Election Inspection: A One Ticket Ballot – The Spectrum

“As student body elections approach [at North Dakota State University], Mason Wenzel, a junior finance major and student government’s current executive commissioner of finance, and Katie Mastel, a junior marketing major and student government’s current executive commissioner for external affairs, are running unopposed for president and vice president, respectively, of student government….The third pillar of their campaign is academics … [including] expanding open textbooks….Expanding the use of open textbooks means making free online textbooks available and making them the required readings for some courses, with a few set up as early as this fall, Wenzel said….”

Election Inspection: A One Ticket Ballot – The Spectrum

“As student body elections approach [at North Dakota State University], Mason Wenzel, a junior finance major and student government’s current executive commissioner of finance, and Katie Mastel, a junior marketing major and student government’s current executive commissioner for external affairs, are running unopposed for president and vice president, respectively, of student government….The third pillar of their campaign is academics … [including] expanding open textbooks….Expanding the use of open textbooks means making free online textbooks available and making them the required readings for some courses, with a few set up as early as this fall, Wenzel said….”

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Colmcille and the Battle of the Book: Technology, Law and Access to Knowledge in 6th Century Ireland

Abstract: Many hundreds of years before the GPL was even a twinkle in Richard Stallman’s eye, an Irish monk proved to be an unlikely champion of the geeky A2K notion of access to knowledge. The short version of the story of Colmcille and the battle of the book goes something like this – One monk copied another monk’s manuscript. The second monk objected and they settled things the way they did in those days, with 3000 people getting killed in the resulting battle. The interesting thing from the A2K perspective is that there was an attempt, prior to the battle, to settle the dispute in the Irish High Court at the time; and remarkably, the arguments invoked in that hearing could have come straight out of one of the modern digital copyright disputes. Have attitudes to law and technology really changed a whole lot in 1400 years? 

Open Access: Project Euclid | Duke University Press News

“We have created a series of five blog posts covering open access at Duke University Press. Today’s post features Project Euclid, a not-for-profit hosting and publishing platform for the mathematics and statistics communities, managed jointly by Cornell University Library and Duke University Press. Here Leslie Eager, Director of Publishing Services for Project Euclid, shares more about the platform and the ways it supports open access in the mathematics and statistics world.

Our goal at Project Euclid is to make mathematics and statistics publications easy and affordable to find and read online. Supporting open-access publishing is a huge part of that mission. About 70% of Project Euclid is open access.

 

With Project Euclid the idea is to provide low-cost but feature-rich hosting services for journals, books, and conference proceedings so that publishers can keep the scholarship affordable and widely available to libraries and researchers while sustaining themselves financially. We partner with math and stats publishers around the world.”

Are Textbook Prices Too High? – The Lions’ Pride

“With the rising costs of textbooks, many college students are finding it increasingly difficult to purchase the ones that are required for all of their classes each semester. This undoubtedly has the potential to severely impact their performance in class, as their grades may greatly suffer. Similarly, many people are discouraged about earning a higher education because they not only have to think about tuition, but they also have to consider the soaring costs of textbooks they have to pay each semester.

A report posted by the United States Public Interest Group in February of 2016 stated that, ‘Over the last decade, the price of college textbooks has soared. Since 2006, the cost of a college textbook increased by 73% – over four times the rate of inflation. Today, individual textbooks often cost over $200, sometimes as high as $400.’

The report also went on to say that, ‘Nearly 5.2 million U.S. undergraduate students spend a total of $1.5 billion dollars of financial aid on textbooks every semester, or $3 billion per year.’

From these statistics, it is evident that textbook costs have been on the rise and are progressively getting higher. But if this is so, how are students expected to purchase textbooks throughout their entire college career?

Here on campus, a few students shared how they managed to afford their textbooks this semester.”

Emory receives $1.2 million grant to help shape future of scholarly publishing | Emory University | Atlanta, GA

“Emory College of Arts and Sciences has launched a $1.2 million effort that positions it to be a national leader in the future of scholarly publishing. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation is funding the multiyear initiative to support long-form, open-access publications in the humanities in partnership with university presses.

The idea to explore new models for humanities publishing was born out of a working group of faculty and administrators headed by Michael A. Elliott, interim Emory College dean and Asa Griggs Candler Professor of English.

‘Emory is a good place for this because we have faculty that are adventurous in their disciplinary interests and already thinking of addressing multiple audiences,’ Elliott says. ‘It will be rigorous scholarship, available to everyone.’

Led by the Bill and Carol Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry, the endeavor will bring together efforts in Emory College, Emory Libraries, the Center for Faculty Development and Excellence and the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship.

At the helm is Sarah McKee, most recently managing editor of the New Georgia Encyclopedia. She arrived this month as the Fox Center’s senior associate director of publishing, tasked with rolling out ventures that publish humanities monographs as digital publications.

The project will run through 2020 and calls for Emory to share the cost and benefit of publishing new long-form works.”

Consultation on the second Research Excellence Framework

“This document sets out the proposals of the four UK higher education funding bodies for the second Research Excellence Framework (REF) for the assessment of research in UK higher education institutions. The proposals seek to build on the first REF conducted in 2014, and to incorporate the principles identified in Lord Stern’s Independent Review of the REF….”

For open access, see especially paragraphs 55, 68, 69, 116, 117, and all of Annex C (on OA monographs).