Quantitative Analysis of Culture Using Millions of Digitized Books | Science

Abstract:  We constructed a corpus of digitized texts containing about 4% of all books ever printed. Analysis of this corpus enables us to investigate cultural trends quantitatively. We survey the vast terrain of ‘culturomics,’ focusing on linguistic and cultural phenomena that were reflected in the English language between 1800 and 2000. We show how this approach can provide insights about fields as diverse as lexicography, the evolution of grammar, collective memory, the adoption of technology, the pursuit of fame, censorship, and historical epidemiology. Culturomics extends the boundaries of rigorous quantitative inquiry to a wide array of new phenomena spanning the social sciences and the humanities.

Luminos

“Luminos is University of California Press’ new Open Access publishing program for monographs. With the same high standards for selection, peer review, production and marketing as our traditional program, Luminos is a transformative model, built as a partnership where costs and benefits are shared….

Monographs are the cornerstone of scholarly research in the humanities and social sciences, but have long been under siege. Shrinking library budgets and rising costs result in higher prices. The upshot is that presses must reduce the number of titles they publish, regardless of the merits of the work.

In the current system, distribution is limited to a few hundred purchases of each monograph. Libraries can’t build comprehensive collections, and readers can’t find or access important scholarly work. And new forms of digital and multimedia scholarship can’t flourish in a print-first/only model. It’s time for a breakthrough….

Open Access offers the potential to exponentially increase the visibility and impact of scholarly work by making it globally accessible and freely available in digital formats. Costs are covered up front through subventions, breaking down barriers of access at the other end—for libraries and for individual readers anywhere in the world.

Open Access provides our framework for preserving and reinvigorating monograph publishing for the future….

We believe in sharing costs between all parties who benefit from publication—author or institution, publisher, and libraries. In our model no one entity carries the whole burden, making it sustainable for the long haul.

The selection and review processes remain the same as in our traditional program; the same exacting criteria and peer review standards apply.

Creative Commons licensing options allow authors to control how their work is used….”

Free Ebook Foundation

“The Free Ebook Foundation envisions a world where ebooks will be funded, distributed and maintained for the benefit of all, by coordinating the efforts and resources of many.

Programs

Unglue.it launched in 2012 with a focus on sustainable funding models for freely-licensed ebooks. For the last two years, it has worked to improve the access and distribution of these books by building a database of over 1200 Creative Commons licensed ebooks. Unglue.it was been incubated by Gluejar, Inc., a privately held company founded by Eric Hellman

GITenberg began in 2013 when Seth Woodworth wanted to improve some ebooks from Project Gutenberg. He decided to load the ebooks onto GitHub, a version control and collaborative software development platform. There are now 50,000 public domain ebooks in GITenberg, open to use and improvement by anyone. GITenberg received a prototype grant from the Knight Foundation. Many of the innovations pioneered by GITenberg are now being adapted for application to Project Gutenberg.

The Mellon Foundation has funded a project led by the University of Michigan, in which the Free Ebook Foundation, University of Michigan Press, and Open Book Publishers are “Mapping the Free Ebook Supply Chain”. The goal is to better understand how free ebooks are being discovered, acquired, and used….”

 

A landscape study on open access and monographs: Policies, funding and publishing in eight European countries

Knowledge Exchange is continuously active in promoting Open Access by bringing together Open Access experts from all six KE partner countries. This study was initiated by Knowledge Exchange and financed by Knowledge Exchange, FWF, CRIStin and Couperin, and together with the skilled expertise of Eelco Ferwerda, Frances Pinter and Niels Stern, we can now publish the biggest landscape study on the conditions and potentials for Open Access books yet. 

The report builds on i.a. 73 in-depth conversations, conducted across eight different countries (Denmark, Finland, Germany, Netherlands, United Kingdom, France, Norway and Austria) to understand current developments among three stakeholder groups: publishers, funders and libraries. The importance of author attitudes, scholarly reward and incentive systems is also raised throughout the study by numerous interviewees.

The report creates an overview of the OA monographs policies, funding streams and publishing models for all eight countries for the first time.

PubSweet Enters the Game – Book Sprints

“We have been developing a new platform for the rapid and collaborative development of books. Its called ‘PubSweet’ and will be released under an Open Source license shortly. It is a very lightweight framework for online book development and is intended to be very modular and very simple to use and extend. We have been using it for a while and will clean up the design and a few bugs and get it out there….”

Editoria – Scholarly Monograph Platform – Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

“Since the second quarter of this year, we have been building a platform with the University of California Press and the California Digital Library. Initially, we were a small team – Kristen, Jure, and Adam – and we were tasked with designing and building an open source monograph production platform with our good friends at UCP and CDL. 

It was an ambitious undertaking as we were building the platform against the yet-to-exist PubSweet backend, and we were also in need of deciding what our design and build paradigm would be, and who was going to do the actual work. In short, we needed to design a platform, build the backend platform on top of which we were to build the Editoria platform, plus find a team….

We proceeded in what is emerging as ‘the Coko way’. We used and supported existing open source projects where we could (Substance and Vivliostyle), we invented open source technology and processes that made sense to us, and found talented people to work with that we also liked….”

University of California Press and California Digital Library to Partner with Collaborative Knowledge Foundation to Build Open Source Monograph Publishing Platform – University of California Press Blog

“We’re excited to announce that the University of California Press and California Digital Library have partnered with Collaborative Knowledge Foundation to develop, Editoria, a new open source, digital-first  book production platform.

Through the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the University of California Press (UCP) and the California Digital Library (CDL) have embarked on a project to build an open source platform for content and workflow management of book-length works. The goal of the project is to create a shared resource for presses and library publishers to automate book production in multiple formats using a versatile, web-based production workflow system….”

Knowledge Unlatched to open up its central platform for the funding of Open Access models – Knowledge Unlatched

“Berlin, 5th October 2017 Knowledge Unlatched (KU) is pleased to announce its transformation into a central Open Access (OA) platform. Through this platform, KU will support publishers and OA initiatives by managing the funding processes for their OA models. It will also provide libraries and funders all over the world with one central place where they can support OA programmes. Knowledge Unlatched’s core product, KU Select, will remain an important part of the platform, and will be including STEM alongside HSS titles in 2018.”

OER Saves Students $1 Million in Textbook Costs   | Today at Santa Fe | Santa Fe College | Gainesville, FL

“Over the last few years, several Santa Fe College professors opted to forego the use of traditional textbooks and use Open Educational Resources (OER) to save students money.  OER content is licensed in a manner that provides perpetual permission resulting in the ability to retain, reuse, revise, and redistribute content.”

Sophia Project – Online resources in philosophy and ethics

“Founded in 1999 by college educators, the Sophia Project is an online collection of original articles, primary source texts, and commentaries in the fields of philosophy and ethics designed to provide the newcomer to the discipline of philosophy with the resources necessary to read great philosophical works.  We believe that with the proper guidance almost any intelligent person can begin a life-long reading program in philosophy…and perhaps even become a bit wiser in the process….”