Open Knowledge in the Curriculum: Building competencies, attributes and literacies – Open.Ed

“At the University of Edinburgh we believe that the creation of open knowledge and open educational resources are fully in keeping with our institutional vision, purpose and values, to discover knowledge and make the world a better place, while ensuring that our teaching and research is diverse, inclusive,?accessible to all and relevant to society.  This commitment to open knowledge is more important now than ever,  in the midst of a global pandemic that has disrupted education for millions of learners around the world. Indeed in response to the COVID-19 crisis, UNESCO has issued a Call for Joint Action to support learning and knowledge sharing through Open Educational Resources (OER) with a view to building more inclusive, sustainable and resilient Knowledge Societies….”

Open Pedagogy Incubator

“The Open Pedagogy Incubator is a semester-long program designed to incentivize faculty to go beyond the first step in open education – adopting open course materials – to implement multiple open-enabled practices in their courses. Modeled on our successful Alt-Textbook program and the 2019 pilot of our OPEN Incubator, the Open Pedagogy Incubator brings together a cohort of faculty instructors to develop competencies in open pedagogy through a series of hands-on workshops, curated readings, and cohort discussions.

Program members gain knowledge, skills, and support in three main areas:

The potential of open pedagogy as a way to center faculty expertise, student agency, and social justice

Current and emerging models of open pedagogical practice including renewable assignments

Concrete processes for implementing open pedagogy in courses they are leading….”

Using Open Pedagogy to Engage LIS Students: A Case Study

Abstract:  INTRODUCTION This case study describes the experimental use of open pedagogy to teach graduate-level library and information science (LIS) students in a newly developed course on international and comparative librarianship. Open pedagogy is the theory and practice of engaging students as creators of course content rather than requiring them to be consumers of it. In this case, students created an open textbook; each student authored a chapter about libraries and the field of librarianship in an assigned non-North American country. The textbook was developed under a Creative Commons license as an open educational resource (OER), allowing free use, remixing, and repurposing in future sections of the course or in similar courses offered in LIS programs at other institutions. METHOD The author used student perception data collected from a voluntary survey instrument and from a compulsory reflection paper assignment to assess the efficacy of implementing an open pedagogy framework in the course. RESULTS Collected data suggests the experiment produced results perceived by the majority of students as efficacious in the given context. DISCUSSION Students were enthusiastic in their embrace of creating renewable versus disposable coursework, and they expressed great satisfaction with the course outcomes of contributing to the professional literature, building the discipline’s nascent OER record, and having a publication to feature in their curricular and professional dossiers. CONCLUSIONS Massive shifts in teaching and learning demand radical transitions. Open pedagogy is a response to that demand that requires additional research and experimentation.

 

View of Editing for equity: Understanding instructor motivations for integrating cross-disciplinary Wikipedia assignments | First Monday

Abstract:  Advances in both research and advocacy have demonstrated how Wikipedia-based education, as a movement, has grown exponentially in the last 10 years. As a result, academics know a lot more about specific learning outcomes that Wikipedia assignments might enable and are more familiar with issues of social equity (e.g., systemic biases related to gender) in the encyclopedia. Despite these advances, little scholarship has focused on instructor motivations for utilizing Wikipedia assignments. This paper reports on a survey of over 100 instructors engaged in Wikipedia-based education practices in order to contribute a cross-disciplinary picture of instructor motivations. Our findings suggest that instructors take up Wikipedia-based assignments for a number of reasons beyond learning objectives: including social influence (being inspired by others), providing students an opportunity to contribute to public knowledge, and motivations related to addressing social equity, among others. Participants who are directly motivated to address issues of social equity rationalize their pedagogy as opportunities for activism or advocacy, professional identity, and critical pedagogy. Finally, this paper provides recommendations to Wikipedia Education stakeholders in regards to the finding that instructors’ professional identities play a significant role in their motivation to address issues of social equity.

 

View of Editing for equity: Understanding instructor motivations for integrating cross-disciplinary Wikipedia assignments | First Monday

Abstract:  Advances in both research and advocacy have demonstrated how Wikipedia-based education, as a movement, has grown exponentially in the last 10 years. As a result, academics know a lot more about specific learning outcomes that Wikipedia assignments might enable and are more familiar with issues of social equity (e.g., systemic biases related to gender) in the encyclopedia. Despite these advances, little scholarship has focused on instructor motivations for utilizing Wikipedia assignments. This paper reports on a survey of over 100 instructors engaged in Wikipedia-based education practices in order to contribute a cross-disciplinary picture of instructor motivations. Our findings suggest that instructors take up Wikipedia-based assignments for a number of reasons beyond learning objectives: including social influence (being inspired by others), providing students an opportunity to contribute to public knowledge, and motivations related to addressing social equity, among others. Participants who are directly motivated to address issues of social equity rationalize their pedagogy as opportunities for activism or advocacy, professional identity, and critical pedagogy. Finally, this paper provides recommendations to Wikipedia Education stakeholders in regards to the finding that instructors’ professional identities play a significant role in their motivation to address issues of social equity.

 

Cengage/McGraw-Hill Merger Called Off – SPARC

On May 4, 2020, textbook publishing giants Cengage and McGraw-Hill announced that they have called off their proposed merger, which would have created a $5 billion publishing giant and turned the college textbook market into an effective duopoly. Announced just over a year ago, the proposed merger has drawn widespread opposition from the higher education community— including students, consumer groups, libraries, universities, and bookstores—along with growing concern from House and Senate lawmakers and antitrust authorities.

“Defeating this merger is a win for students, faculty, and preserving competition in the textbook marketplace,” said Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC. “In an industry already rife with anticompetitive practices, preventing this merger averts dire harms that could have caused textbook prices to rise, innovation to dwindle, and student data to be exploited.”

[…]

Online Learning and Copyright Exceptions for Education | infojustice

“As schools have closed in response to the Coronavirus 19 pandemic, interest in online learning has increased dramatically. Online learning often involves distributing copyrighted works online, so it is governed by copyright limitations that vary widely from one country to the next. Some countries allow teachers, parents, and/or students to share works or parts of works online for educational purposes. Other countries do not, or place different types of conditions on the limitation.  Earlier InfoJustice blogs have discussed copyright and distance learning in Ireland and Canada, and two blogs about the United States (one | two).

In 2018, PIJIP surveyed copyright profiles in 21 countries asking a wide range of questions about copyright exceptions. (We are in the process of surveying more countries, and currently have completed, coded data on 23.) The survey and all of the answers are available at infojustice.org/survey. One question in particular asked if countries’ laws allowing unauthorized uses for educational purposes applied to use in online courseware.  

16 of the 23 respondents said that their countries’ copyright laws “clearly” or “mostly/probably” allowed the online sharing of copyrighted works for educational purposes. 7 respondents said their countries’ laws did not. Both groups of countries include relatively wealthier and less wealthy countries. …”

David Porter on the Benefits of Open Educational Resources as Millions Shift to Online Learning – Michael Geist

“Millions of Canadians are at home, schools are closed, and Canada is undergoing an unprecedented shift to distance or online learning. Adapting course materials to the online learning environment can create significant new challenges for teachers and students alike. Open educational resources (OERs) provides a model for convenient, cost-effective access with no copyright barriers to worry about, expensive texts to purchase, or restrictions on adaptation, customization or re-use. David Porter, who has been a leader in open and distance learning since the 1990s, joins the podcast to discuss how the current shift to online learning places the spotlight on the benefits of OERs and open textbooks….”

Education Continuity License: Copyright Permissions for Educational Use

“The COVID-19 pandemic has affected our daily lives in significant ways. Across the U.S. and in other countries, schools are closed, moving instruction from the classroom to distance learning models. We are aware that you and other educators across the K-12 to post-secondary spectrum are taking steps to address this crisis and modify and deliver instruction to reach and engage learners, many of whom are at home and are online.

Educators in the U.S. are contacting CCC with questions about using copyrighted materials in their student lessons during the pandemic. As CCC is not able to offer advice as to whether a license to use the material is required,  CCC has coordinated with publishers to authorize the use of publishers’ materials in distance learning models and other uses as required by the pandemic, at no cost to the user, during this time of emergency….

CCC, on behalf of the relevant publisher or other copyright rights holder (“Rightsholder”), authorizes you to use the copyrighted materials identified by you in this submission form within the United States in any way necessary to continue home schooling, online education and any other mechanism required in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.? This includes uses such as (but not limited to) reproduction and distribution of copies, display (such as through a computer), performance (such as reading aloud) and other copyright-protected rights to the extent the relevant Rightsholder has the rights to grant them.? This authorization is valid through August 1, 2020. No other uses are authorized except as stated herein.

 

In consideration of this authorization, you agree to provide the information requested below. Such information will be used only in accordance with CCC’s privacy policy. For clarity, you will not be charged any fees by CCC or the Rightsholder in connection with this authorization. Click here for a series of FAQs about the Education Continuity License….”

Education Continuity License: Copyright Permissions for Educational Use

“The COVID-19 pandemic has affected our daily lives in significant ways. Across the U.S. and in other countries, schools are closed, moving instruction from the classroom to distance learning models. We are aware that you and other educators across the K-12 to post-secondary spectrum are taking steps to address this crisis and modify and deliver instruction to reach and engage learners, many of whom are at home and are online.

Educators in the U.S. are contacting CCC with questions about using copyrighted materials in their student lessons during the pandemic. As CCC is not able to offer advice as to whether a license to use the material is required,  CCC has coordinated with publishers to authorize the use of publishers’ materials in distance learning models and other uses as required by the pandemic, at no cost to the user, during this time of emergency….

CCC, on behalf of the relevant publisher or other copyright rights holder (“Rightsholder”), authorizes you to use the copyrighted materials identified by you in this submission form within the United States in any way necessary to continue home schooling, online education and any other mechanism required in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.? This includes uses such as (but not limited to) reproduction and distribution of copies, display (such as through a computer), performance (such as reading aloud) and other copyright-protected rights to the extent the relevant Rightsholder has the rights to grant them.? This authorization is valid through August 1, 2020. No other uses are authorized except as stated herein.

 

In consideration of this authorization, you agree to provide the information requested below. Such information will be used only in accordance with CCC’s privacy policy. For clarity, you will not be charged any fees by CCC or the Rightsholder in connection with this authorization. Click here for a series of FAQs about the Education Continuity License….”