Sustainability | Free Full-Text | Challenges for Open Education with Educational Innovation: A Systematic Literature Review

Abstract:  Open education can enrich learning environments and support the processes of educational innovation. The objective of this article is to analyze the evidence published about open education in the period 2014–2019 to identify future challenges. We performed a Systematic Literature Review (SLR), identifying 245 articles on the topic of open education in the databases, Web of Science (WOS), and Scopus, from January 2014 to June 2019. We filtered to obtain the most relevant data by applying inclusion, exclusion, and quality criteria. The results yield information on (1) the characteristics of the publications; (2) the methodological trends; (3) the central and transversal dimensions of the topic; and (4) the innovative educational practices that have been implemented. The article concludes with a presentation of the challenges that are linked to coverage, empirical evidence, co-creation, and innovation. The contribution of this research is to add value to the body of knowledge available to trainers, researchers, and decision-makers interested in open education and educational innovation. View Full-Text

 

The Open Covid Pledge: lifting the lid | Association for Learning Technology

“Since we launched the Open Covid Pledge for Education, more than 100 open educators and more than 40 organisations have pledged to share their knowledge to support the educational response to COVID-19.

It’s a wonderful expression of solidarity in the face of enormous challenges. But what does an open pledge really mean, and what could it achieve? …”

Informed Open Pedagogy and Information Literacy Instruction in Student-Authored Open Projects – Open Pedagogy Approaches

“Open pedagogy has often been touted as empowering, liberating, and revolutionary. While many interpretations of the term open pedagogy exist, this chapter specifically focuses on an open pedagogy in which students are creating openly licensed works in a classroom environment. Open pedagogy affords librarians, instructors, and students a unique way to guide how courses are taught and how students learn. However, while working openly can be empowering, liberating, or even revolutionary, I argue that it is unethical to mandate or strongly encourage students to produce open work without themselves understanding the implications of working openly. I argue that it is only when students understand the political intent behind these types of open projects?—speaking to a much broader open education and open access movement?—that they might decide for themselves to continue to engage in and support open work. Open practice is only powerful when the students involved understand why they are engaging in this work and deciding for themselves that this is something they are personally and politically invested in. Furthermore, it is only when students understand the concept of open and their own rights as authors that they can ethically engage in this type of open pedagogy.

In other words, if we are using open pedagogy to encourage students to themselves be part of the open education movement, then students must understand what open practice is and how it relates to their own lives. I posit an informed open pedagogy that 1) teaches students about, and brings students into, the greater open education movement, in which 2) students decide individually and negotiate as a whole their preferred individual and collective authorship that lastly, 3) allows students to opt-out at any point in the class, or later can provide a more ethical design to open pedagogical practices. This informed open pedagogy can be elicited through the practices of information literacy instruction….”

CC Open Education Platform Activities Fund: Six Winners!

Creative Commons is proud to announce six winning project proposals from the inaugural round of the CC Open Education Platform Activities Fund!

Openness and Collaboration by Paul Downey (CC BY 2.0)Credit: “Openness and Collaboration” by Paul Downey (CC BY 2.0).

The CC Open Education Platform is a vibrant, international network of over 1120 open education advocates, educators, librarians, lawmakers, graduate students, and more, spanning 79 countries. This year, CC launched an activities fund to support Platform members’ good work to further open education in their countries. The activities fund offered up to $5,000 USD to community members who proposed efforts that: 1) Build and sustain community; 2) Increase educational access and equity; and/or 3) Use policy to open education opportunities for all. Accepted proposals focus on work supporting these goals in Brazil, Chile, Francophone Africa, India, Ireland, and globally. 

While we would have liked to fund nearly all of the projects, we are delighted to announce the following proposal winners: 


  • “Teaching materials introducing copyright to 9 to 15-year-olds in French-speaking Africa.”

Proposed by Isla Haddow-Flood and Florence Devouard (at Wiki In Africa), this project will create and pilot introductory materials and assignment models to support teachers instructing 9-15-year-old students in French-speaking Africa about CC licenses and their use. Across Africa, teachers do not have access to online materials to explain Copyright or CC licenses to their students, and especially not in French. The materials created will begin to fill the gap. The materials will be initially piloted in Benin as part of the WikiChallenge Bénin competition. The project will integrate feedback initial testing before distributing teaching materials among the Wikimedia and CC communities across Francophone Africa. 

  • “Inventory and evaluation of existing social-emotional learning resources for the transition to open digital learning.”

Shivi Chandra proposed this project recognizing that a global mandate for “twenty-first century skills” has pushed social-emotional learning (SEL) materials–those which promote “well-being, connectedness, and success” (OECD)–to the forefront of many national educational strategies working to help students make sense of recent global crises, social movements, and COVID-19. These materials could be anything from public health guidance to conversation starters on domestic violence to current events news articles for kids.This project from Learning Equality will develop and share a gap analysis and preliminary audit of existing SEL resources either open or accessible on the internet. This work supports any organization looking to improve their general understanding of SEL resources, understand those available, advocate for openness in the SEL community, and develop such resources during and post COVID-19.

  • “Oficinas Wikimedia & Educação: a educação livre no Brasil e as plataformas Wikimedia (EN: Wikimedia & Education Workshops: free education in Brazil and the Wikimedia platforms).

Giovanna Fontenelle proposed this project to help Brazilian educators and institutions searching for new formats and teaching alternatives. The Wiki Movimento Brasil User Group will organize a series of online workshops and develop accompanying resources such as an audio description for an educational brochure, open-licensed videos of the workshops, reference materials for educators, participant lists for networking, and Outreach Dashboard metrics.

  • “Open Reading Lists @UCD: Phase One.”

Proposed by Susan Reilly, this project will offer a training and mobilisation workshop for librarians supporting a shift to OER, an awareness-raising campaign targeted at faculty and course coordinators, and a video tutorial on finding and assessing OER. The rapid shift to online and blended learning necessitated by COVID-19 demonstrated the need for more open and participatory engagement online and more sustainable access to diverse learning materials. This project aims to increase OER as a percentage of material on reading lists in University College Dublin, Ireland. 

  • “Offline OER to enhance K-12 math in Chile.”

Werner Westermann proposed this project to help deliver customized OER content, responsive and aligned to the official Chilean “prioritized” curriculum, a core group of learning outcomes for math, highlighted during school disruption during COVID-19. Ideally, this curriculum will be used to support learners using Kolibri, meeting the needs of learners with limited or no Internet connectivity during COVID-19 and beyond.

  • “Open Pathology Education Project.”

Netha Hussain proposed this project focused on curating and annotating pathology images from Wikimedia Commons. Drawing from India’s Calicut Medical College and Dr. Yale Rosen’s collections, this project will use Wikidata as a tool to organize and categorize images for medical students to use as educational resources. As Wikidata doesn’t yet have robust pathology related information, images and descriptions from Wikimedia Commons will be first linked with Wikidata, and then used for the Open Pathology Project. The final resource will serve medical students from around the world.

We are delighted to fund projects that range from work with off-line open math and developing OER for medical education to fueling additional work with sister communities such as Wikimedia. 

We also want to recognize our decision committee (listed alphabetically), members of the CC Open Education Platform who dedicated hours to application review—difficult job considering they read, scored, and deliberated over 20 amazing proposals from platform members.

  • Cindy Domaika
  • Geoff Cain
  • John Okewole
  • Jonathan Poritz
  • Mohammed Galib Hasan
  • Neil Butcher
  • Paola Corti
  • Paul West
  • Rachel Wexelbaum
  • Shanna Hollich

To our decision committee, platform colleagues who submitted inspiring proposals, and the fantastic CC Open Education Platform community—thank you! We look forward to seeing project results in December 2020, and we expect these projects to fuel more open education advancements in 2021 and beyond. 

Learn more about the CC Open Education Platform and how to get involved! 

The post CC Open Education Platform Activities Fund: Six Winners! appeared first on Creative Commons.

Do students lose depth in digital reading?

“Do students learn as much when they read digitally as they do in print?…

Most studies have found that participants scored about the same when reading in each medium, though a few have indicated that students performed better on tests when they read in print….

Some researchers are beginning to pose more nuanced questions, including one scholar who has considered what happens when people read a story in print or on a digital device and are then asked to reconstruct the plot sequence. The answer: Print yielded better results.

Another aspect of learning is to see how outcomes differ when students are doing their reading in less prescriptive experimental conditions. One study let students choose how much time to spend when reading on each platform. The researchers found that participants devoted less time to reading the passage onscreen – and performed less well on the subsequent comprehension test….

When asked on which medium they felt they concentrated best, 92 percent replied “print.” For long academic readings, 86 percent favored print. Participants also reported being more likely to reread academic materials if they were in print….”

Do students lose depth in digital reading?

“Do students learn as much when they read digitally as they do in print?…

Most studies have found that participants scored about the same when reading in each medium, though a few have indicated that students performed better on tests when they read in print….

Some researchers are beginning to pose more nuanced questions, including one scholar who has considered what happens when people read a story in print or on a digital device and are then asked to reconstruct the plot sequence. The answer: Print yielded better results.

Another aspect of learning is to see how outcomes differ when students are doing their reading in less prescriptive experimental conditions. One study let students choose how much time to spend when reading on each platform. The researchers found that participants devoted less time to reading the passage onscreen – and performed less well on the subsequent comprehension test….

When asked on which medium they felt they concentrated best, 92 percent replied “print.” For long academic readings, 86 percent favored print. Participants also reported being more likely to reread academic materials if they were in print….”

Sign the Open Covid Pledge for Research in Education | Association for Learning Technology

“We pledge to make our intellectual property openly and freely available to the world to support educators, students and decision-makers, to help educational organisations survive and thrive, and to build a fairer and more resilient education system.

We pledge – where possible – to openly license or dedicate to the public domain our intellectual property.”

Call for Proposals — Open Education Conference 2020

“The theme of the 2020 Open Education Conference is “Reimagining Open Education.” This theme reflects how the events of 2020 have underscored urgent challenges in education—both new and longstanding—from the rapid pivot online in response to a global pandemic, structural inequities including systemic racism, and barriers to the access and full participation in the exchange of knowledge. 

This year’s conference seeks to inspire attendees to “reimagine” open education as a solution to these many challenges, and also to think critically about how the current practice of open education can be more equitable and inclusive. The theme also applies to the conference itself, which is in the process of “revising” and “remixing” itself as a community-owned event as it enters its seventeenth year.

Reimagining must be an active process. It starts with critical reflection and the formulation of ideas, but it is only meaningful if concrete action follows. In choosing the theme of reimagining, our intent is to spark active efforts to reinvigorate, reinvent, and reshape open education for a more equitable future….”

Call for Proposals — Open Education Conference 2020

“The theme of the 2020 Open Education Conference is “Reimagining Open Education.” This theme reflects how the events of 2020 have underscored urgent challenges in education—both new and longstanding—from the rapid pivot online in response to a global pandemic, structural inequities including systemic racism, and barriers to the access and full participation in the exchange of knowledge. 

This year’s conference seeks to inspire attendees to “reimagine” open education as a solution to these many challenges, and also to think critically about how the current practice of open education can be more equitable and inclusive. The theme also applies to the conference itself, which is in the process of “revising” and “remixing” itself as a community-owned event as it enters its seventeenth year.

Reimagining must be an active process. It starts with critical reflection and the formulation of ideas, but it is only meaningful if concrete action follows. In choosing the theme of reimagining, our intent is to spark active efforts to reinvigorate, reinvent, and reshape open education for a more equitable future….”