Brazil Adopts Open Licensing in National Textbook Program – SPARC

Brazil’s Programa Nacional do Livro Didático (PNLD) is one of the largest national textbook programs in the world. Each year, the program procures curricula for a set of primary or secondary school subjects, including textbooks and digital supplemental resources for teachers. In 2017, PNLD spent R $1.3 billion (approximately US $400 million) to purchase more than 150 million textbooks for nearly 30 million students. 

On passing an open access policy at Florida State University: From outreach to implementation | Soper | College & Research Libraries News

I’d like to share a little bit about the road to OA policy adoption and implementation at FSU. By reflecting on some of the factors that paved the way to our successful vote, as well as the nature of the work that followed, my hope is that our experience might help or encourage those who are considering or working toward adopting a policy at their own institutions.

Open Access Debate

“I created Open Access Debate after witnessing teams whose schools couldn’t afford briefs and expensive database subscriptions lose to those who had access to these materials. The large, well-coached teams reap enormous benefits from the expertise of their coaching staff in addition to research guidance. Hopefully this resource can be used by debaters all across the country to bridge the gap between large and small, funded and unfunded, and coached and uncoached….”

Open Innovation in Development: Integrating Theory and Practice Across Open Science, Open Education, and Open Data by Jeremy de Beer :: SSRN

Abstract: “This article integrates the concepts of open innovation and open development. It extends the theory of open development beyond the field of information communications technology to address aspects of innovation systems more generally. It applies the concept of openness to innovation in practice across the domains of open science, open education, and open data. Creating a framework that is more integrated in theory and cross-cutting in practice creates new possibilities for interdisciplinary research and policy-relevant insights.”

Open Access and Education: the cases of SABER and the Open Educational Resources (OER) – Inventa International

“Multiple studies carried out by international institutions, such as the UN, identified Intellectual Property Rights as partially responsible for the existence of a difference between ‘information-rich’ and ‘information-poor’ due to the exclusion they create. Thus, an approach to the management of Intellectual Property, taking into account human development and fundamental rights, has proved to be essential.

In this context, the Open Access approach to copyright management emerged as the most appropriate model to promote education through access to information and creative content.

Under this model, intellectual works, such as educational and research materials, are made available online free of charge.”

The Pledge – I support Open Principles for Science and Education for building a better world for everyone | ICA Commission on Open Source Geospatial Technologies

“Please find below the  pledge for  supporting Open Principles for Science and Education for building a better world for everyone .

‘I believe Science is a public good and quality education opportunities should be open and accessible for everyone.

I will work to eliminate the digital divide and contribute to building up Open Knowledge for the benefit of all humanity, with special effort to enlighten future generations.

I contribute my service for the betterment of all humanity using the guiding principles of the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in building a better world for everyone.

I will work to advance and increase Open Knowledge for the benefit of all humanity with special consideration of those less fortunate.

I will be a voice for Open Principles in Science and Education and promote this pledge through my networks.’

Thank you for your support.”

Bologna Open Recognition Declaration (bord)

“Open access to knowledge and education is widely recognised as an irreplaceable factor for social and human growth and an indispensable component to consolidate and enrich citizenship, capable of giving citizens the necessary competencies to face the challenges of the new millennium, together with an awareness of shared values and of belonging to diverse social and cultural spaces. The importance of education and educational cooperation in the development and strengthening of stable, inclusive, peaceful and democratic societies is universally acknowledged as paramount. We now need to add open recognition to this list….This can be supported by encouraging the adoption of more open currencies to capture and share learning achievements whether in formal, informal or nonformal settings….Our consortium is coordinating its actions to reach the following objectives in the short term, which we consider to be of primary relevance in order to establish an Open Architecture for the Recognition of Learning Achievements: [1] Open recognition for all: First, we encourage everyone—learners, educators, citizens and organisations—to actively participate in and take ownership of the emerging open recognition movement. Participating includes: taking personal responsibility in one’s own learning and in the recognition of others’ achievements, contributing to the design, implementation and/or exploitation of local and/or global systems of recognition. [2] Open recognition technologies and infrastructure: Second, we call on the community of learning practitioners and technology developers to establish a trustworthy system of human and machine verifiable learning credentials and to adopt open standards facilitating the comparability and transferability of learning credentials. [3] Open recognition policies: Third, we call on governments, public authorities and educational stakeholders to implement inclusive policies facilitating and encouraging the recognition of learning achievements whether in formal, non-formal and informal settings, with bridges between all three. Those policies should ensure the existence of multiple developmental pathways, increased flexibility and accessibility and the inclusion of socially excluded and disenfranchised groups….”

BCcampus welcomes two new Open Education Advisors | BCcampus

“BCcampus is delighted to announce the newest members to join our team.  Please help us in welcoming Open Education Advisors, Lucas Wright (UBC) and Rajiv Jhangiani (KPU). Lucas joins BCcampus from UBC, where he works as an Educational Consultant: Learning Technology, Teaching and Learning Professional Development, at the Centre for Teaching and Learning. Rajiv joins BCcampus from KPU, where he is the University Teaching Fellow in Open Studies and a Psychology professor. Both Lucas and Rajiv have tremendous experience in open education and the B.C. post-secondary environment. As Open Education Advisors, they will support open education projects, including the newest Zed Cred degrees, and OER grants, advocate for open education in B.C., and work with all B.C. post-secondary institutions to advance open education initiatives.”

Open Licensing and Open Education Licensing Policy – Creative Commons

“The new book Open: The Philosophy and Practices that are Revolutionizing Education and Science, edited by Rajiv Jhangiani and Robert Biswas-Diener, features the work of open advocates around the world, including Cable Green, Director of Open Education at Creative Commons. This excerpt from his chapter, ‘Open Licensing and Open Education Licensing Policy,’ provides a summary of open licensing for education, as well as delves into the philosophical and technical underpinnings of his work in ‘open.’

Read and download the entire book via Ubiquity Press and follow Cable on Twitter @cgreen.”