Elsevier: the price of success

In its most recent publication, Education International examines the publishing giant Elsevier, whose success on the market is based on ethically questionable practices which endanger the transmission of knowledge and its condition as a public good.

Welcome | Institute for the Study of Knowledge Management in Education

“ISKME is an independent, education nonprofit whose mission is to improve the practice of continuous learning, collaboration, and change in the education sector. Established in 2002, ISKME conducts social science research and develops evidence-based innovations that improve knowledge sharing in education. Based in Silicon Valley’s Half Moon Bay, California, ISKME is well known for its pioneering open education initiatives that support student-centered teaching and learning practices throughout the globe. ISKME also assists policy makers, foundations, and education institutions in designing, assessing, and bringing continuous improvement to education policies, programs, and practice….”

Accessibility and Digital Content/Creation | REBUS Foundation

“In the Fall of 2017, Rebus Foundation Assistant Director, Zoe Wake Hyde, took part in a roundtable discussion at University of California, focusing on making digital content and creation more accessible for people with disabilities. The gathering was convened by the Authors Alliance, the Silicon Flatirons Center, and the Berkeley Center for Law and Technology, and it brought together a diverse group of participants.

That meeting generated the report, Authorship and Accessibility in the Digital Age, which is now available on the Author’s Alliance Website. Zoe’s thoughts on the experience, including the written report, offer a uniquely Rebus perspective….”

Bold innovations in openwashing | Abject

“One could argue that Audrey Watters’ dismissal of today’s announcement is a little harsh, somewhat cynical. Maybe insistence on open code and open content as necessary conditions for “open education” is a case of ‘zeal over pragmatism’.

But if proprietary content and platforms in service of for-profit enterprises [Udacity] counts as “open education”, just what is the “open” part supposed to be? Audrey’s subsequent tweets offer a clue….

Open as in doors. Open as in hearts. Open as in “for business”. And give them credit, the venture capitalized open education movers have proven tireless in making deals and spewing triumphant press releases. The Open Education Alliance represents the latest landmark in this glorious history.

In any event, while a concept such as open source carries certain obligatory qualities, when we talk about education the application of “open” is more closely related to how ‘All Natural!’ or ‘New and Improved!’ are used on our supermarket shelves. It’s gotten to the point where I find myself hesitant to use a term like “open education” when I speak with people. And I wonder if I still want to be called an open educator….”

OpenCon 2018 Jakarta

From Google’s English: “The OpenCon Satellite event is the OpenCon 2018 event flagship event held in Toronto Canada in collaboration with York University. The OpenCon Satellite Event itself is held in various parts of the world with a total of more than 67 countries in the world. OpenCon 2018 Jakarta is a satellite event held in Indonesia by Open Access Indonesia with a global theme “Empowering the next generation to advance open access, open education and open data.” Meanwhile, the sub theme for OpenCon 2018 Jakarta satellite event is: “Bringing Students Together by Mainstreaming Open Education, Open Access, and Open Data. ”  …”

OSPRI Home | Open Source Pedagogy, Research + Innovation (OSPRI) @ Duke

“Mission: Harness the power of open source principles and methodologies to design and scale open learning contexts for a more equitable and collaborative world.

OSPRI is transforming education for the 21st century. Guided by open source principles and methodologies like open knowledge and access to information, collaboration and community, transparency and meritocracy, inclusion and diversity, and iterative creation and adaptability, OSPRI is designing an open learning ecosystem for a more open world….”

Open Access at MIT and Beyond A White Paper of the MIT Ad Hoc Task Force on Open Access to MIT’s Research

This white paper is the first deliverable of the OA task force. Its goal is to give MIT students, staff, and faculty an overview of the open access landscape at MIT, in the United States, and in Europe to help inform discussions at the Institute over the next year. These discussions, which will take place at community forums and in other venues, including the task force idea bank, will help inform the task force as it develops a set of recommendations across a broad spectrum of scholarly outputs, including articles and books, data, educational materials, and code.