Author Talk: Democratizing our Data by Julia Lane Tickets, Tue, Jun 30, 2020 at 12:30 PM | Eventbrite

“Just as Google, Amazon, Microsoft, Apple, and Facebook have led the world in the use of data for profit, the United States can show the world how to produce data for the public good. Lane calls for a more automated, transparent, and accountable framework for creating high-quality public data that would empower citizens and inspire the government that serves them….”

Unforgotten: the people, lost and found, in receipt of social care – Future Care Capital

“Our own work has made extensive use of publicly available data and, to help others, we have produced a Social Care Data Finder which comprises of a timeline with links to social care datasets that have been openly published in the UK since January 1st 2020. The aim is to maintain a data finder that can be used as a resource for social care research, so the timeline will be updated at regular intervals to capture the publication of new datasets and we welcome suggestions for inclusion. At present, our Social Care Data Finder serves as a portal to data published by pertinent national bodies, but we will move to incorporate local datasets and others in due course….”

Call for Evidence: Use of Open Government Data in COVID-19 Outbreak – Google Docs

“The OECD Secretariat, through the Digital Government and Data Unit, is calling for evidence on the release and use of Open Government Data (OGD) in response to the COVID-19 outbreak. We would like to hear from you about what data are being released and how different actors (such as entrepreneurs, media, researchers, CSOs, and the own public sector) are innovating with them to support countries’ policies and actions….”

Creating An Open Data Infrastructure For Better Public Services

“To deploy open data on a local or state level, public offices need to have a sustainable framework. Here’s a full roadmap public institutions could use to introduce the concept of free-to-access-and-share data to communities and staff.

This is a step-by-step checklist of practices that, paired with software consulting service, help design reliable and scalable open data infrastructures….”

There is value in open data — but it’s hard to prove | Apolitical

“After over a decade of embracing “open data”, a long list of core questions remain unanswered. The challenge of demonstrating how, and to what extent open data contributes to transparency, better citizen engagement, supporting researchers and driving economic development persists.

We often hear that “openness”, as a guiding philosophy in the management of public sector information, is a product of recent advances in technology. But, before open data was invented as a concept, “open access” publishing which aimed to foster greater public access to tax-payer funded research, and “open source” software, which laid the groundwork for collaborative, decentralised and non-proprietary sharing of computer code had already made a significant impact on the public sector.

But when it comes to government data, the idea of “openness” remained fairly abstract and non-committal until the 21st of January 2009. That was the day Barack Obama was inaugurated as US President, and the same day his administration delivered its memorandum of “Transparency and Open Government”. This memorandum directed the heads of government agencies to enact policies that reflected the principles of “transparency, public participation and collaboration”. The memorandum was followed by the launch of the U.S Government’s open data portal, data.gov, in May 2009 which featured 47 datasets from across Federal Government Agencies. The U.K followed in January 2010; then Australia and New Zealand and Singapore in 2011; and the EU, Japan and South Korea in 2012….”

There is value in open data — but it’s hard to prove | Apolitical

“After over a decade of embracing “open data”, a long list of core questions remain unanswered. The challenge of demonstrating how, and to what extent open data contributes to transparency, better citizen engagement, supporting researchers and driving economic development persists.

We often hear that “openness”, as a guiding philosophy in the management of public sector information, is a product of recent advances in technology. But, before open data was invented as a concept, “open access” publishing which aimed to foster greater public access to tax-payer funded research, and “open source” software, which laid the groundwork for collaborative, decentralised and non-proprietary sharing of computer code had already made a significant impact on the public sector.

But when it comes to government data, the idea of “openness” remained fairly abstract and non-committal until the 21st of January 2009. That was the day Barack Obama was inaugurated as US President, and the same day his administration delivered its memorandum of “Transparency and Open Government”. This memorandum directed the heads of government agencies to enact policies that reflected the principles of “transparency, public participation and collaboration”. The memorandum was followed by the launch of the U.S Government’s open data portal, data.gov, in May 2009 which featured 47 datasets from across Federal Government Agencies. The U.K followed in January 2010; then Australia and New Zealand and Singapore in 2011; and the EU, Japan and South Korea in 2012….”

New Public Data Tool Lets You See What Curricula Schools in Nebraska Are Using – Teaching Now – Education Week Teacher

“Across the country, it’s hard to know exactly which curricular materials schools are using—there isn’t a national directory of districts’ selections. But in a new tool released last week, Nebraska unveiled a searchable database showing the resources the state’s districts have adopted.

The interactive instructional materials map, which Nebraska’s education department debuted on Thursday, shows what curricula districts are using for English-language arts, math, and K-8 science. The map is a project of the Nebraska Instructional Materials Collaborative, an ongoing effort to support districts in implementing high-quality, standards-aligned resources.

It’s rare for a state to collect and publish information on district curriculum choices in an accessible way. While Massachusetts has a similar tool, many districts in the U.S. are in the dark as to what their peers statewide are using. …”

Consumer interest and preferred formats for disclosure of restaurant inspection results, Minnesota 2019 | Journal of Food Protection

“In recent years, numerous state and local health departments have developed systems to disclose restaurant inspection results to consumers. Public disclosure of restaurant inspection results can reduce transmission of foodborne illness by driving improvements in sanitary conditions. In Minnesota, restaurant inspection results are not readily accessible for consumers to use to make decisions about where to eat. The objective of this study was to assess the consumer interest among Minnesota adults in having better access to restaurant inspection results and to identify preferred formats for disseminating this information. We conducted a survey among 1,188 Minnesota residents aged 18 years or older at the 2019 Minnesota State Fair. Overall, 94.4% of respondents wanted better access to restaurantsâ?? inspection information. More than three-quarters of respondents (77.1%) stated that they would use this information to decide where to eat. Respondents wanted to see inspection results online (71.6%) and at restaurants (62.1%). Increasing public access to inspection results could reinforce efforts by public health agencies and food service operators to improve the safety of foods prepared away from home.”

 

PSI | OA Metrics Generator

“This new tool from PSI generates open access usage statistics for publishers and university repositories. Partnership with Scholarly IQ ensures these metrics can be fully COUNTER compliant. With PSI’s OA Metrics Generator you can develop a deeper understanding of your organisational readership….”

The power of open data to transform and engage communities: a call for ideas – Knight Foundation

“But this is just the tip of the iceberg. The power of data — especially “open” data, made available by government and, in some cases, private companies — also extends to the possibility of better informing and engaging residents, encouraging them to participate in more civically-focused activities.

It’s in this context that Knight Foundation is issuing an open call for ideas that advance the concept of open data and civic engagement to encourage a new set of transformative approaches for using, understanding and taking action with public data. Selected recipients can earn a share of up to $1 million in funding for their ideas and projects….”