Open Journal Systems (OJS) sets new standards to achieve OpenAIRE compliance with JATS – OpenAIRE Blogs

Open Journal Systems (OJS, https://pkp.sfu.ca/ojs/) is an open source journal management and publishing system, developed by the Public Knowledge Project (PKP, https://pkp.sfu.ca/). Around 10,000 journals worldwide and over a thousand journals published in Europe use Open Journal Systems. The latest major version OJS 3 was released in 2016, and since then hundreds of OJS journals have upgraded including large national journal platforms like Tidsskrift.dk and Journal.fi.Therefore, it is important to help the growing number of OJS 3 journals to become compliant with the OpenAIRE infrastructure in terms of comprehensive metadata descriptions of open access articles on research in Europe and beyond….”

Open Journal Systems (OJS) sets new standards to achieve OpenAIRE compliance with JATS – OpenAIRE Blogs

Open Journal Systems (OJS, https://pkp.sfu.ca/ojs/) is an open source journal management and publishing system, developed by the Public Knowledge Project (PKP, https://pkp.sfu.ca/). Around 10,000 journals worldwide and over a thousand journals published in Europe use Open Journal Systems. The latest major version OJS 3 was released in 2016, and since then hundreds of OJS journals have upgraded including large national journal platforms like Tidsskrift.dk and Journal.fi.Therefore, it is important to help the growing number of OJS 3 journals to become compliant with the OpenAIRE infrastructure in terms of comprehensive metadata descriptions of open access articles on research in Europe and beyond….”

Open Access Requirements for Horizon 2020-Funded Projects | Jisc scholarly communications

UK institutions and organisations are particularly well represented in Horizon 2020, the biggest EU Research and Innovation programme ever with nearly €80 billion of funding available over 7 years (2014 to 2020), and Jisc is the National Open Access Desk in the UK for OpenAIREAdvance, one of whose tasks is to ensure that Horizon 2020-funded projects comply with funding policies. As such, we routinely contact project coordinators or research officers on behalf of OpenAIRE.  The relationship makes sense, because Jisc works on digital infrastructures across the country, and we supply HEI with the Janet Network, as well as a host of open access/open science services. In some instances, however,coordinators have not been cascading down the information we’ve sent to others who are involved in the various projects.

There is one particular Open Access obligation for all Horizon2020 projects that takes priority over many of the others:

Open Access Mandate:  All H2020 projects must provide open access (OA) to all peer-reviewed scientific publications that stem from project activities, immediately or otherwise within 6/12 months of publication where publisher embargoes apply.  Non-compliance can lead to a grant reduction and potential sanctions….”

Open Access Requirements for Horizon 2020-Funded Projects | Jisc scholarly communications

UK institutions and organisations are particularly well represented in Horizon 2020, the biggest EU Research and Innovation programme ever with nearly €80 billion of funding available over 7 years (2014 to 2020), and Jisc is the National Open Access Desk in the UK for OpenAIREAdvance, one of whose tasks is to ensure that Horizon 2020-funded projects comply with funding policies. As such, we routinely contact project coordinators or research officers on behalf of OpenAIRE.  The relationship makes sense, because Jisc works on digital infrastructures across the country, and we supply HEI with the Janet Network, as well as a host of open access/open science services. In some instances, however,coordinators have not been cascading down the information we’ve sent to others who are involved in the various projects.

There is one particular Open Access obligation for all Horizon2020 projects that takes priority over many of the others:

Open Access Mandate:  All H2020 projects must provide open access (OA) to all peer-reviewed scientific publications that stem from project activities, immediately or otherwise within 6/12 months of publication where publisher embargoes apply.  Non-compliance can lead to a grant reduction and potential sanctions….”

Study quantifies the growing traction of open access

Now an analysis shows that researchers in the UK are indeed posting their papers online earlier, as are their colleagues all over the world. The time researchers are taking to post papers online shrunk by an average of 472 days per country between 2013 and 2017, finds a study published on 17 April and to be presented at the ACM/IEEE Joint Conference on Digital Libraries in June. Though the authors can’t definitively say what’s behind the trend, they suggest that the Research England policy and other funding eligibility requirements recently announced worldwide are pushing academics to rapidly make their work freely available….”

Do Authors Deposit on Time? Tracking Open Access Policy Compliance – Open Research Online

Abstract:  Recent years have seen fast growth in the number of policies mandating Open Access (OA) to research outputs. We conduct a large-scale analysis of over 800 thousand papers from repositories around the world published over a period of 5 years to investigate: a) if the time lag between the date of publication and date of deposit in a repository can be effectively tracked across thousands of repositories globally, and b) if introducing deposit deadlines is associated with a reduction of time from acceptance to open public availability of research outputs. We show that after the introduction of the UK REF 2021 OA policy, this time lag has decreased significantly in the UK and that the policy introduction might have accelerated the UK’s move towards immediate OA compared to other countries. This supports the argument for the inclusion of a time-limited deposit requirement in OA policies.

Library-Mediated Deposit: A Gift to Researchers or a Curse on Open Access? Reflections from the Case of Surrey

Abstract:  The University of Surrey was one of the first universities to set up an open access repository. The Library was the natural stakeholder to lead this project. Over the years, the service has been influenced by external and internal factors, and consequently the Library’s role in developing the OA agenda has changed. Here, we present the development and implementation of a fully mediated open access service at Surrey. The mediated workflow was introduced following an operational review, to ensure higher compliance and engagement from researchers. The size and responsibilities of the open access team in the Library increased to comply with internal and external policies and to implement the fully mediated workflow. As a result, there has been a growth in deposit rates and overall compliance. We discuss the benefits and shortcomings of Library mediation; its effects on the relationship between the Library, senior management and researchers, and the increasing necessity for the Library to lead towards a culture of openness beyond policy compliance.