For China’s ambitious research reforms to be successful, they will need to be supported by new research assessment infrastructures | Impact of Social Sciences

“A radical reform of research evaluation and funding in China was recently launched in two prescriptive policy documents published by the Ministry of Science and Technology and the Ministry of Education. China now moves from a strong focus on Web of Science-based indicators towards a more balanced combination of qualitative and quantitative research evaluation, with one third of all publications to be oriented towards domestic journals. Universities are urged to implement the policy locally by the end of July at the latest. How to do it, and the possible consequences, have aroused intense discussion among Chinese academics and gained worldwide attention and debate. 

This change has not come out of the blue. In 2016, President Xi Jinping called for reform towards a more comprehensive evaluation system for individual researchers. Further, in 2018, a document issued by three ministries and two national central institutions specifically proposed moving away from the “Four only” phenomenon of  recognising and rewarding “only papers, only titles, only diplomas and only awards”….

Public Domain and misuse: some thoughts – Pagode

“An example of this, that particularly catched the attention of PAGODE – Europeana China because it relates to a Chinese cultural heritage item, has recently come to the stage: a beautiful image of a Chinese embroidered cloth (a so-called rank-badge) depicting a leopard, in PD from the Metropolitan Museum of Arts, was recently used to illustrate the cover page of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Journal, titled “Emerging infectious diseases”.

The Journal and CDC were immediately flooded with expressions of outrage and concern of many from the Asian-American community and beyond, at the inappropriate use of a Chinese work of art on the cover and tweet-posting of a journal issue devoted to scholarly articles on COVID-19 and other respiratory infections.

The power of imaging should not be underestimated, as the choice of this image in such a context may suggest an emphasis on animals in China as carriers of the disease, resulting in an unvoluntary but certainly irresponsible example of using a PD digital item. The sensitivity about associating the COVID-19 crisis straightforward with China is clearly understandable, especially in America in this moment of xenophobia concerns and protests; but the explaination of CDC cuts short, by stating this is all a misunderstanding, and simply confirming that the image was chosen just for decorative purposes, being a striking piece of art – as indeed it is. At the moment, no reaction is known from the Metropolitan Museum of Arts as the content holder of the misused digital image.

The entire story is deepened in an interesting article by Hyperallergic magazine….”

EDP Sciences – EDP Sciences and the National Science Library, Chinese Academy of Sciences conclude a significant agreement on article processing charges in support of open access

“EDP Sciences and the National Science Library, Chinese Academy of Sciences (NSLC) are pleased to announce the successful conclusion of an agreement on article processing charges (APCs) which enables all corresponding authors affiliated with eligible Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) academic institutes to publish open access, at a discounted rate, in a range of EDP Sciences journals.

The agreement applies to all fully open access or hybrid journals published by EDP Sciences. Upon submission, corresponding authors of eligible CAS academic institutes will be identified automatically and a 20% discount applied to their APC. Once published, their articles will be freely available in open access. APCs will also include the ‘Liberty APC’ which allows the corresponding author to decide the level of the charge (from 0 to 900 Euros) to which the 20% discount will then be applied….”

OUP agrees first Read & Publish deal in China | The Bookseller

“Oxford University Press and the National Science Library’s Chinese Academy of Science have announced a new Read & Publish agreement said to be the first of its kind in mainland China.

Covering 26 of the institutions of the Chinese Academy of Science, the three-year deal provides complete access to OUP’s journals collection for participating institutions and over the course of the deal will mean that an increasing amount of the research outputs produced by participating CAS researchers is published Open Access. …”

Oxford University Press and National Science Library, Chinese Academy of Sciences agree first Read & Publish deal in China | Journals | Oxford Academic

“Oxford University Press (OUP) and the National Science Library, Chinese Academy of Sciences (NSLC) are pleased to announce a landmark new Read & Publish agreement, the first of its kind in Mainland China. 

Covering 26 of the institutions of CAS, the three-year deal is the first of its kind in China. It provides complete access to OUP’s prestigious journals collection for participating institutions and over the course of the deal will mean that an increasing amount of the research outputs produced by participating CAS researchers is published open access.  …”

Oxford University Press and National Science Library, Chinese Academy of Sciences agree first Read & Publish deal in China | Journals | Oxford Academic

“Oxford University Press (OUP) and the National Science Library, Chinese Academy of Sciences (NSLC) are pleased to announce a landmark new Read & Publish agreement, the first of its kind in Mainland China. 

Covering 26 of the institutions of CAS, the three-year deal is the first of its kind in China. It provides complete access to OUP’s prestigious journals collection for participating institutions and over the course of the deal will mean that an increasing amount of the research outputs produced by participating CAS researchers is published open access.  …”

CNKI free services during COVID-19 and OA long-term practice | Sustaining the Knowledge Commons / Soutenir les savoirs communs

Abstract:  Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), initiated in 1999 by Tsinghua University and Tsinghua Tongfang Co., Ltd., is both the largest institutional repository in China and a near-monopoly provider of for-pay academic databases with a higher profit margin than Elsevier or Wiley, among other services. With promotion and support from the government, CNKI keeps developing its track towards open access [1]. CNKI offers free access to millions of documents ranging from dissertations and academic articles to popular and party journals. The COAA, Chinese Open Access Aggregator, launched in 2019, makes available more than 10,000 open access journals, although foreign scholars may find it difficult to benefit from this due to the language. CNKI has played an important role in making works on COVID-19 freely available, as well as in expanding access to subscribers at home during lock-down.

 

Chinese state censorship of COVID-19 research represents a looming crisis for academic publishers | Impact of Social Sciences

“Issues of censorship surrounding the publication of scholarly research in China have been prominent since a series of press reports and publisher statements revealed that works had been removed from circulation that were deemed sensitive by Chinese buyers. As George Cooper observes, evidence that Chinese authorities are conducting pre-publication vetting of COVID-19 related research, raises new challenges for publishers seeking to distribute open access research papers on this subject, as there is little ground for publishers to remove these papers from their platforms. As publisher commitments to openness collide with their obligations to operate within the legal frameworks of the countries they operate in, it is argued that COVID-19 presages an overdue discussion on the limits of openness in publishing….

It remains to be seen whether Open Access articles will escape these restrictions, as they’re disseminated freely and therefore not subject to laws, in China, restricting the sale of publications. But equally, state authorities such as the General Administration of Press and Publications could threaten publishers, as they have before, with a ban on the import of their entire output in China, unless suitable amendments are made to their Chinese-language platforms. An unexplored consequence of forcing publishers to comply with censorship demands in the case of Open Access research is that the less censorious route – refusing to make amendments to the content of journals, prompting importers to remove journals from circulation instead – would not be available. Publishers would be confronted with a binary choice: remove ‘sensitive’ Open Access articles from their Chinese platforms, or risk huge losses of revenues and access for their entire published output….”

Chinese state censorship of COVID-19 research represents a looming crisis for academic publishers | Impact of Social Sciences

“Issues of censorship surrounding the publication of scholarly research in China have been prominent since a series of press reports and publisher statements revealed that works had been removed from circulation that were deemed sensitive by Chinese buyers. As George Cooper observes, evidence that Chinese authorities are conducting pre-publication vetting of COVID-19 related research, raises new challenges for publishers seeking to distribute open access research papers on this subject, as there is little ground for publishers to remove these papers from their platforms. As publisher commitments to openness collide with their obligations to operate within the legal frameworks of the countries they operate in, it is argued that COVID-19 presages an overdue discussion on the limits of openness in publishing….

It remains to be seen whether Open Access articles will escape these restrictions, as they’re disseminated freely and therefore not subject to laws, in China, restricting the sale of publications. But equally, state authorities such as the General Administration of Press and Publications could threaten publishers, as they have before, with a ban on the import of their entire output in China, unless suitable amendments are made to their Chinese-language platforms. An unexplored consequence of forcing publishers to comply with censorship demands in the case of Open Access research is that the less censorious route – refusing to make amendments to the content of journals, prompting importers to remove journals from circulation instead – would not be available. Publishers would be confronted with a binary choice: remove ‘sensitive’ Open Access articles from their Chinese platforms, or risk huge losses of revenues and access for their entire published output….”

Proposal for OA Publishing of Research Papers on Novel Coronavirus Pneumonia in CNKI

“At present, China is courageously fighting against the COVID-19. Driven by the expectations of the whole country and even the whole world, Chinese medical talents have urgently launched all-round research on issues such as disease prevention and control, pathology, clinical diagnosis and treatment, and the development of new drugs, sparing no effort to make key technology breakthroughs as soon as possible and to completely defeat the epidemic. As the researches move on, more and more new achievements will be made in the near future. The research is not only a particularly important project but also a severe challenge for the medical circle of China and the world. Therefore, it is urgently necessary to publish the latest domestic and foreign research achievements as soon as possible and to provide timely, comprehensive and systematic knowledge services to the public and the professionals both at home and abroad, which is also a major responsibility of Chinese academic journals on medicine and health and relevant online platforms and also provides an important opportunity for China’s development of world-class research journals.

After deliberation, the Chinese Medical Association Publishing House, the Chinese Preventive Medicine Association, Chinese Medical Doctor Association, China Association of Chinese Medicine, Chinese Medical Association, and China Academic Journals (CD Edition) Electronic Publishing House Co., Ltd. jointly advocate to mobilize the journals affiliated to these associations and the outstanding academic journals on medicine and health across China, especially the journals that have already started online-first publishing in China National Knowledge Infrastructure ?CNKI?, for immediate action. In particular, great efforts will be made to focus on the research on COVID-19 as a major topic, to organize open access?OA? publishing of high-quality and high-level research achievements in CNKI, to apply research achievements to the fight against the epidemic as soon as possible, and to facilitate the wide spread of research achievements across China and the world. The cost for open access publication and related services will be completely covered by CNKI….”