Open Access Publishing in China

Following rapid development in the economy and huge investment in R&D, China is now widely recognised as one of the leading countries of the world in terms of the number of published journals and scientific articles. In 2015, there were over 10,000 journals in China, of which 4983 (49.76%) were in Science and Technology, according to the “Statistical Data of Chinese Science and Technology Papers 2015.

More Int’l collaborations seen in China’s research paper output: Nature Index_china.com

“Over the past two decades, China’s scientific community has started to embrace open science, increasing its number of data repositories and open-access journals, according to the [Nature Index 2017 China supplement].

However, strong policies and changes to academic culture are needed before science in the country can become fully open and transparent, and cultural change is also needed to boost participation in science communication among Chinese researchers, the supplement also said….”

ERIC – Open Access in China and Its Effect on Academic Libraries, Journal of Academic Librarianship, 2013-Jan

Abstract:  OA is to become the future of academic library exchanges in China. With the government’s support and promotion of OA, more and more Chinese academic libraries have been committed to participating in OA. The rapid development of OA not only has changed the model of traditional scholarly communication and brought a free communication environment of scholarly information, but also continues to impact on all aspects of academic libraries, including their role, collections, technology and services.

Bioline International Official Site (site up-dated regularly)

“Bioline International is a not-for-profit scholarly publishing cooperative committed to providing open access to quality research journals published in developing countries. BI’s goal of reducing the South to North knowledge gap is crucial to a global understanding of health (tropical medicine, infectious diseases, epidemiology, emerging new diseases), biodiversity, the environment, conservation and international development. By providing a platform for the distribution of peer-reviewed journals (currently from Bangladesh, Brazil, Chile, China, Colombia, Egypt, Ghana, India, Iran, Kenya, Malaysia, Nigeria, Tanzania, Turkey, Uganda and Venezuela), BI helps to reduce the global knowledge divide by making bioscience information generated in these countries available to the international research community world-wide….”

Should Indian researchers pay to get their work published?

[We’re tagging this version of the article from the Google Cache because the repository version is unreachable. The repository URL is dead <http://eprints.iisc.ernet.in/54926/> (Nov 2017).

Abstract: “We raise the financial and ethical issue of paying for getting papers published in professional journals. Indian researchers have published more than 37,000 papers in over 880 open access journals from 61 countries in the five years 2010-14 as seen from Science Citation Index Expanded. This accounts for about 14.4% of India’s overall publication output, considerably higher than the 11.6% from the world. Indian authors have used 488 OA journals levying article processing charge (APC), ranging from INR 500 to US$5,000, in the five years to publish about 15,400 papers. More than half of these papers were published in just 13 journals. PLoS One and Current Science are the OA journals Indian researchers use most often. Most leading Indian journals are open access and they do not charge APC. Use of OA journals levying APC has increased over the four years from 242 journls and 2557 papers in 2010 to 328 journals and 3,634 papers in 2014. There has been an increase in the use of non-APC journals as well, but at a lower pace. About 27% of all Indian papers in OA journals are in ‘Clinical Medicine,’ and 11.7% in ‘Chemistry.’ Indian researchers have used nine mega journals to publish 3,100 papers. We estimate that India is potentially spending about US$2.4 million annually on APCs and suggest that it would be prudent for Indian authors to make their work freely available through interoperable repositories, a trend that is growing significantly in Latin America and China, especially when research is facing a funding crunch. We further suggest bringing all Indian OA journals on to a single platform similar to SciELO, and all repositories be harvested by CSIR-URDIP which is already managing the OA repositories of the laboratories of CSIR, DBT and DST. Such resource sharing will not only result in enhanced efficiency and reduced overall costs but also facilitate use of standard metadata among repositories.”

Academics pay journals to publish ghost-written articles to get promotions – Global Times

“Scandals involving plagiarism and publication ethics have been plaguing Chinese academia for a long time. A recent expose by Plagiarism Watch, a US-based website that monitors academic plagiarism, is the latest to further reveal the murky side of the Chinese academic world….All these journals are open-access journals, which means they are either financed by an institution or by article processing charges paid by submitting authors. On average, these journals charge between $1,350 to $2,250 to publish an article. Cheng Weihong, a reviewer at the Crop Journal published by the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, once attempted to calculate the total article processing charges paid by Chinese researchers to open access journals in 2015. He arrived at the staggering figure of $72.17 million, or 470 million yuan….”

Academics pay journals to publish ghost-written articles to get promotions – Global Times

“Scandals involving plagiarism and publication ethics have been plaguing Chinese academia for a long time. A recent expose by Plagiarism Watch, a US-based website that monitors academic plagiarism, is the latest to further reveal the murky side of the Chinese academic world….All these journals are open-access journals, which means they are either financed by an institution or by article processing charges paid by submitting authors. On average, these journals charge between $1,350 to $2,250 to publish an article. Cheng Weihong, a reviewer at the Crop Journal published by the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, once attempted to calculate the total article processing charges paid by Chinese researchers to open access journals in 2015. He arrived at the staggering figure of $72.17 million, or 470 million yuan….”

Perceptions of open access publishing are changing for the better

“A survey of 22,000 academic researchers by Nature Publishing Group (NPG) and Palgrave Macmillan has found that a decreasing number of authors are concerned about perceptions of the quality of open access publications.

In 2014, 40% of scientists who had not published open access in the last three years said “I am concerned about perceptions of the quality of OA publications.” But this year, only 27% said they were concerned. In the humanities, business and social sciences (HSS), the drop was more marked; from 54% in 2014 to 41% in 2015. Nonetheless, concerns about perceptions of the quality of OA publications is still the leading factor in authors choosing not to publish OA….”