Que faut-il faire pour que la science soit plus ouverte? (What needs to be done to make science more open?)

From Google’s English: 

“Open science is the practice of making research publications and data freely available. It takes advantage of the digital transition to develop open access to publications and, to the fullest extent possible, to research data.”

Open Science | ANR

From Google’s English: “The open science policy initiated by the ANR in 2013 is fully in line with the National Open Science Plan launched by Minister Frédérique Vidal in July 2018, with the following three objectives:

Promote open access to publications (Open Access)

As part of the ANR’s contribution to the promotion and implementation of open science, and in connection with the National Open Science Plan, the coordinator and the partners and the partners commit themselves in the event of funding to deposit scientific publications (full text) from the research project in an open archive, either directly in HAL or through a local institutional archive, under the conditions of Article 30 of the Law “For a Digital Republic ” . Moreover, the ANR recommends favoring publication in journals or books natively open access.

Contribute to open data whenever possible (Open Data)

In order to implement the principle “as open as possible, as closed as necessary” and in accordance with FAIR principles (Easy to find, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable), the NRA encourages coordinators to consider the issue of research from the editing and throughout the project. The Agency will request the development of a data management plan for all funded projects within 6 months of the start of the project starting from the 2019 edition. This document summarizes the description and evolution of the projects. datasets, it prepares the sharing, reuse and sustainability of data….

Coordinate actions at European and international level

 

ANR is also involved in several transnational initiatives in which it takes the French position in favor of open science and bibliodiversity. She is a member of the coalition S which brings together several funding agencies to accelerate the transition to a full and immediate access to scientific publications and supports the S Plan . The Agency is also a member of the GO FAIR office in France….”

Ouvrir la Science – Criteria for the eligibility of projects for funding by the National Fund for Open Science

“A number of criteria,  qualified as exemplarity criteria, have been defined by the Committee for Open Science. They will be used to guide the choice of investments to be made in scientific publishing and more particularly in platforms, infrastructures and editorial content. Candidate projects will have to correspond to these characteristic criteria.

France’s ambitions in the field of scientific publishing were set out in the national plan for open science. This plan states that the scientific community must regain control of the editorial system and focus its efforts on virtuous actors in an open and ethical environment.

There are 44 criteria….

They have been classified on three levels: essential , highly recommended and desired. Those labelled “essential” are mandatory criteria….”

The politics of open access in action – Samuel Moore

“Open access is a movement constituted by conflict and disagreement rather than consensus and harmony. Given just how much disagreement there is about strategies, definitions, goals, etc., it is incredible that open access has successfully transformed the publishing landscape (and looks set to continue to do so). As OA increases in popularity and inevitability, more conflict arises between those from a range of disciplines and positions, and especially those encountering OA for the first time (often through coercive mandates)….”

Ouvrir la Science – Critères pour l’éligibilité des projets au financement par le Fonds national de la science ouverte

From Google’s English: “The criteria, 44 in number , are divided according to different themes.

For the operation of the platforms and the infrastructures, it is about:

  • the governance,
  • transparency,
  • viability / sustainability
  • replicability / portability.

And for the editorial contents of:

  • governance / integrity / editorial policy,
  • the legal framework,
  • the business model / generalities,
  • the economic model / special cases of journals and collections with payment per unit of publication costs,
  • accessibility / interoperability / sustainability of content.

They are classified according to three levels : indispensable, highly recommended and desired. …”

In support of open infrastructures: A statement from OPERAS in response to the ‘Open Research Library’, a new initiative from Knowledge Unlatched

On May 16, Knowledge Unlatched (KU) launched a new hosting platform for Open Access monographs, the Open Research Library (ORL). Notwithstanding its name, we do not consider the Open Research Library to qualify as an open infrastructure.

Better than the German Wiley DEAL? The Couperin Consortium reaches a price reduction of more than 13% over four years in an agreement with Elsevier » scidecode

For some, this may seem better than the Wiley Deal in Germany: French universities and research institutions have agreed in principle, through their Couperin consortium, to renew their national licence with Elsevier. In a letter sent on April 11 to Elsevier by Lise Dumasy, president of Couperin, details of the agreement, which is valid for 4 years, effective as of January 1 this year, are revealed.

With this agreement, French universities and research institutions will have access to the publisher’s „Freedom complete edition“ journal bundle including e.g. The Lancet and Cell Press. However, the consortium does not guarantee to the publisher that all its members will adhere to the national licence….

Here are the main points:

  • Most surprising: This agreement provides for a gradual 13.3% reduction in license costs over 4 years -5% in 2019, -4% in 2020, -3% in 2021 and -2% in 2022, in total -13.305% over four years.
  • There is 25% discount on article processing charges (APC). There will also be a compensatory clause if these APCs increase by more than 3.5%. Excluded from this discount are – as I understand it – only the society journals, e.g. The Lancet and the Cell Press titles. Included are all Open Access journals and hybrid journals. The 3.5% threshold refers to annual price increases.
  • Regarding Green Open Access the agreement allows automatic access 12 months after formal publication to the „accepted author manuscript“ (AAM) or post print directly on Elsevier’s service Sciencedirect. After 24 months the pdf file of this manuscript will be deposited on the HAL platform (the CNRS Open Access Repository). The license to make AAMs available is more restrictive than most Creative Commons licenses. It allows reading, downloading, printing, translating, text & data mining but does not allow redistribution or re-use (neither commercial or non-commercial)….”

Norway and Elsevier meet a nine million Euro agreement including a Gold Open Access clause » scidecode

“The Norwegian consortium for higher education and research and the publishing house Elsevier agreed two days ago to a national license. This provides Norwegian researchers not only access to articles published in Elsevier’s journals (including the society journals as The Lancet or CELL Press) but also the opportunity to publish their results Open Access. Seven universities and 39 research institutions will benefit from the two-year agreement….

In similar agreements, e.g. in Finland, an Open Access publication was by far not allowed in all Elsevier journals. But according to Openaccess.no the contract covers up to 90 percent of the articles published by scientists from members of the consortium. Only the society journals (about 400 in total) will be excluded….

Just as with the Wiley DEAL in Germany, this agreement also strengthens the allegedly unpopular Hybrid Open Access, which was even disallowed by Plan S. The agreement with Elsevier in France is different and should strengthen Green Open Access.”

Un accord de 4 ans entre Elsevier et la recherche française – The Sound Of Science

“Unlike institutions Swedish and Norwegian or at universities such as California , academic institutions and research French have agreed in principle by the voice of their consortium Couperin, for the renewal of a national license with Elsevier.

In a letter sent April 11 to the scientific publisher that Sound Of Science has procured, Lise Dumasy, president of the consortium, details the terms of the agreement whose duration is 4 years, effective from January 1 2019.

With this agreement, French research institutions will have access to the publisher’s “Freeedom complete edition” magazine package, Lancet included, French Medical Library and Cell Press. However, the consortium does not guarantee the publisher that all its members will adhere to the national license….

This agreement provides for a gradual decrease in license costs of 13.3% spread over 4 years….

The agreement provides for Elsevier to make a 25% rebate on its Article processing charge ( APC ), which can be translated as an Item Processing Fee, which is the price paid by a researcher’s laboratory when it publishes in some journals in Open Access…

A highlight of the agreement is what is known as “green open access”. This term originally refers to how to force open publication of scientific articles by publishing “author” versions of scientific articles. Indeed, the law Republic digital provides that the researchers have the right to publish their article without the modifications that the editor has added (that it is corrections of form or form) after 6 months in STEM (science, technology , engineering and mathematics) and after 12 months in SHS (human and social sciences).

Here, the agreement provides for setting up automatic can access after 12 months’ author manuscript accepted “( MAA ) or postprint streaming directly Sciencedirect, the platform from Elsevier and a manual HAL ( the CNRS open archive ) which points to this streaming. Then, in a second time and after 24 months, the pdf file of this manuscript would be found directly on the HAL platform.

This agreement allows Elsevier to urge French researchers not to worry about the deposit of their articles in “green openaccess” by providing a service that does so but with a broader embargo than allowed by law and in streaming and no with the pdf file accessible directly….”

Paris’s High Court has ordered French ISPs to block access to the pirate libraries LibGen and Sci-Hub

For more than a decade, publishing research articles have been a lucrative business for research institutes. As a result, some sites such as Sci-Hub and LibGen have gained popularity because of offering free access to scientific articles obtained through web scraping.

For instance, Sci-Hub has more than 25 million articles, readily accessible by researchers from all over the world. But Sci-Hub and LibGen have come under intense pressure from academic publishers who are not happy with the service.

The academic publishers believe Sci-Hub and LibGen are pirate libraries which are a threat to their multi-billion dollar industry. The publishers have unsuccessfully drafted ways to shut the services down through lawsuits.

But on March 31, there was a victorious breakthrough for the academic publishers after the French Judiciary ordered several of the largest French ISPs to block access to the pirate libraries; LibGen and Sci-Hub….”