14 Paris Museums Put 300,000 Works of Art Online: Download Classics by Monet, Cézanne & More | Open Culture

“First trips to Paris all run the same risk: that of the museums consuming all of one’s time in the city. What those new to Paris need is a museum-going strategy, not that one size will fit all. Tailoring such a strategy to one’s own interests and pursuits requires a sense of each museum’s collection, something difficult to attain remotely before Paris Musées opened up its online collections portal….”

Open content : plus de 100 000 œuvres des collections des musées de la Ville de Paris en libre accès | Paris Musées

From Google’s English:  “A new step in the development of Paris Museums’ digital policy, the launch of Open Content contributes to increasing and improving the dissemination of collections and reinforces actions in favor of better access to art and culture. It also promotes increased visibility of works and knowledge of municipal collections in France and abroad.

This opening of data guarantees free access and reuse by all of digital files, without technical, legal or financial restrictions, for commercial use or not.

Images representing works belonging to the public domain under CCØ license (Creative Commons Zero) are made available to all internet users via the Paris Musées collections portal. Initially, the reproductions of works in 2D which are not subjected to rights are available in Open Content, the images subjected to rights remain in low definition in order to illustrate the files of the website of the collections. Art lovers can for example download the works of the big names in photography (Atget, Blancard, Marville, Carjat …) or painting (Courbet, Delacroix, Rembrandt, Van Dyck …)….”

Insights into the Economy of Open Scholarship: A look into OpenEdition with Pierre Mounier, deputy director

“OpenEdition is supported financially by the four founding institutions (CNRS [French National Centre for Scientific Research], Aix-Marseille University, EHESS [School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences], Avignon University), which provide the platform with staff, infrastructure and funds to cover operating costs. They also receive support directly from the Ministry of Research (as a research infrastructure). About 50 FTE staff are permanently seconded from the four founding institutions. The staff are divided into an editorial department that manages the relationships with the content producers (blogging researchers, publishers, journal editors), an IT department that runs systems and development, a department for international development and a department dedicated to the Freemium services – ‘Freemium’ being a pricing strategy by which a digital product or service is provided free of charge, but money is charged for additional features. The other main source of revenue stems from project funding – national, regional and European. These funds are used to develop new and innovative tools and services. Recently, OpenEdition has added the Freemium model (ji.sc/2Vxjge3) to their revenue streams, but this system has not been introduced to cover operating costs or infrastructures. Rather, it serves to help the journal publishers and editors to cover their publishing and editing costs. Two-thirds of the money collected is transferred to the publishers OpenEdition works with, while the remaining third is retained to operate the commercial services that sell these Freemium services….”

Elsevier Progresses in Open-Access Deal Making | The Scientist Magazine®

“Last summer, dozens of academic institutions in Sweden let their Elsevier subscriptions lapse, forgoing permission to read new content in the scholarly publisher’s journals. Like other groups in Europe and the US, they were pushing for increased open access and contained costs—and had reached a deadlock in negotiations with the publisher. On Friday (November 22), the two sides announced that they had finally come to an agreement, establishing a so-called transformative deal that includes access to paywalled articles and open-accessing publishing into one fee….”

[Quoting] Wilhelm Widmark, the library director at Stockholm University and a member of the steering committee for the Bibsam consortium, which negotiates on behalf of more than 80 Swedish institutions. “I think Elsevier has become more flexible during the last couple of months.”

Just a day before the Swedish deal was made public, Elsevier and Carnegie Mellon University in Pennsylvania announced a similar deal. These are the latest of several agreements Elsevier has forged to pilot open-access elements since the beginning of 2019. Earlier this year, for example, Hungary and Norway—both countries that had cancelled their subscriptions with the publisher after stagnant negotiations—also announced new contracts with the publisher….

As Elsevier is successfully forging deals on both sides of the Atlantic, there are still two major academic groups missing from these announcements: the University of California (UC) system, which includes 10 campuses, and Project DEAL, which represents around 700 academic institutions in Germany….”

Meet Plume: A new PubSweet platform created by the French Financial Jurisdictions : Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

“The French financial jurisdictions, which include the Paris-based Cour des comptes (the French Superior Audit Institution) and the regional and territorial chambers of accounts, have been collaborating with Coko for the past 10 months, building an experimental PubSweet platform.

The project is part of a program called Public Interest Entrepreneurs, directed by Etalab, a department of the French Interministerial Directorate for Digital Affairs that promotes open data and open source. The project is headed up by two public interest entrepreneurs, Nikos Peteinatos, designer and member of the Editoria Advisory Group, and Erica Marco, developer.

The system, currently under development, is called Plume, and it leverages the PubSweet framework and community modules, including Editoria, Wax and Paged.js (from the forthcoming Cabbage Tree Labs). The pilot phase of the project ran for ten months, and deemed successful, the team now embarks on a secondary phase over the next six months with two new developers joining the team….

The system’s primary function is to facilitate the authoring of audit reports. It can be thought of as a customized version of Editoria….”

Que faut-il faire pour que la science soit plus ouverte? (What needs to be done to make science more open?)

From Google’s English: 

“Open science is the practice of making research publications and data freely available. It takes advantage of the digital transition to develop open access to publications and, to the fullest extent possible, to research data.”

Open Science | ANR

From Google’s English: “The open science policy initiated by the ANR in 2013 is fully in line with the National Open Science Plan launched by Minister Frédérique Vidal in July 2018, with the following three objectives:

Promote open access to publications (Open Access)

As part of the ANR’s contribution to the promotion and implementation of open science, and in connection with the National Open Science Plan, the coordinator and the partners and the partners commit themselves in the event of funding to deposit scientific publications (full text) from the research project in an open archive, either directly in HAL or through a local institutional archive, under the conditions of Article 30 of the Law “For a Digital Republic ” . Moreover, the ANR recommends favoring publication in journals or books natively open access.

Contribute to open data whenever possible (Open Data)

In order to implement the principle “as open as possible, as closed as necessary” and in accordance with FAIR principles (Easy to find, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable), the NRA encourages coordinators to consider the issue of research from the editing and throughout the project. The Agency will request the development of a data management plan for all funded projects within 6 months of the start of the project starting from the 2019 edition. This document summarizes the description and evolution of the projects. datasets, it prepares the sharing, reuse and sustainability of data….

Coordinate actions at European and international level

 

ANR is also involved in several transnational initiatives in which it takes the French position in favor of open science and bibliodiversity. She is a member of the coalition S which brings together several funding agencies to accelerate the transition to a full and immediate access to scientific publications and supports the S Plan . The Agency is also a member of the GO FAIR office in France….”

Ouvrir la Science – Criteria for the eligibility of projects for funding by the National Fund for Open Science

“A number of criteria,  qualified as exemplarity criteria, have been defined by the Committee for Open Science. They will be used to guide the choice of investments to be made in scientific publishing and more particularly in platforms, infrastructures and editorial content. Candidate projects will have to correspond to these characteristic criteria.

France’s ambitions in the field of scientific publishing were set out in the national plan for open science. This plan states that the scientific community must regain control of the editorial system and focus its efforts on virtuous actors in an open and ethical environment.

There are 44 criteria….

They have been classified on three levels: essential , highly recommended and desired. Those labelled “essential” are mandatory criteria….”