Impact of an Open Access Nationwide Treatment Model on Hepatitis C Virus Antiviral Drug Resistance – Douglas – 2020 – Hepatology Communications – Wiley Online Library

“The introduction of the open access model in Australia led to a massive increase in community?based DAA [direct acting antiviral] prescribing, with approximately 33% of persons with chronic HCV infection receiving treatment by the end of 2018.(13) This makes Australia an ideal location to study the impact of DAA treatment on the emergence of resistance under an open access model. Furthermore, Australia has a higher prevalence of genotype 3 infection (~33%) than most developed countries, broadening the global relevance of our findings….”

CAUL and AOASG welcome open access to scholarly content during the COVID-19 pandemic

“CAUL and AOASG welcome moves by commercial publishers to open up their content at this critical time. The rapid development of tests, potential treatments and vaccines to clinical trials has been made possible by the frictionless and immediate sharing of new and early stage research and data by researchers and access to previously paywalled content being provided by publishers. The speed with which many publishers have enabled open access to COVID-19 related content is commendable, and some have also taken the significant step of relaxing access restrictions to content more generally. It also demonstrates that open access to research should be the new norm. The time has come to make free and open access to all research a reality. It is critical that once the pandemic is over, in order to accelerate the global transition to free and open access, publishers do not once again restrict access to COVID-19 content. This will be especially crucial in light of the economic challenges all sectors of society will be facing, including universities dealing with constrained scholarly content budgets. Therefore, we urge publishers to make a commitment to: …”

Details : RESEARCH CONSULTANT (SCHOLARLY COMMUNICATIONS) : The University of Melbourne

“As Research Consultant (Open Access), you will use your knowledge and expertise of scholarly communications and open scholarship practices to develop and deliver advocacy programs, training activities and guidance to academic and professional staff.  You will accelerate the pace of discovery and global impact for University of Melbourne research by making it accessible to wide and diverse audiences through promoting the Principles for Open Access to Research Outputs at Melbourne. This will require liaising with academic and professional staff; designing user-friendly reports to track open access targets; raising levels of scholarly communication literacy; and co-designing training across the University….”

Digitisation is putting the world’s greatest works within reach

“One of the greatest changes in the art world in recent years won’t be seen in galleries because it is happening online. Digitisation programs have accelerated in the past five years and most state art institutions now have more than half of their collections online, changing the way we approach art and rapidly turning the world into a virtual gallery.

BBy the end of this year, Art UK, a cultural resource founded in 2003, will have completed a photographic catalogue of every piece of publicly owned painting and sculpture in Britain.

At home, meanwhile, the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) now has 92 per cent of its collection online (up from just 11 per cent in 2014). The National Gallery of Australia has digitised 60 per cent and the National Museum of Australia 68 per cent of their collections.

These numbers are still dwarfed by the big international aggregation sites that helped foster the global digitisation of visual culture – Wikimedia Commons, Europeana and to a lesser extent Google Arts & Culture. But governments and state institutions are now finishing the task of hanging the world’s art online….”

Digitisation is putting the world’s greatest works within reach

“One of the greatest changes in the art world in recent years won’t be seen in galleries because it is happening online. Digitisation programs have accelerated in the past five years and most state art institutions now have more than half of their collections online, changing the way we approach art and rapidly turning the world into a virtual gallery.

BBy the end of this year, Art UK, a cultural resource founded in 2003, will have completed a photographic catalogue of every piece of publicly owned painting and sculpture in Britain.

At home, meanwhile, the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) now has 92 per cent of its collection online (up from just 11 per cent in 2014). The National Gallery of Australia has digitised 60 per cent and the National Museum of Australia 68 per cent of their collections.

These numbers are still dwarfed by the big international aggregation sites that helped foster the global digitisation of visual culture – Wikimedia Commons, Europeana and to a lesser extent Google Arts & Culture. But governments and state institutions are now finishing the task of hanging the world’s art online….”

Workshop: Global insights into Open Access and advocacy strategies. – UoN room bookings & classes – University of Newcastle Library

“Professor Ginny Barbour, Director of the Australasian Open Access Strategy Group (AOASG) will lead two discussions  to provide insight into Open Access and advocacy strategies. 

The AOASG is a national leader in open access scholarly communications with a focus on advocacy, collaboration and building capacity with Australian and New Zealand to advance open access. 

The Changing Publishing Landscape & the drivers for change 1pm-1:50pm (incl 15 min Q&A)

Overview of international trends in scholarly publishing with reference to the drivers for change towards open scholarship, including emerging models such as pre-prints and policy shifts such as Plan S 

An Australian perspective on open access, the current landscape and possible future directions including ARC & NHMRC policy

What’s in it for academics

Open discussion and Q&A…”

The open access shift at UWA Publishing is an experiment doomed to fail

“A statement released by UWA claims the changes will help “to guarantee modern university publishing into the future”, foreshadowing “a mix of print, greater digitisation and open access publishing.”…

The notion that a respected publishing house can be replaced by open access publishing is disproved by examining other Australian university presses, such as the now-closed University of Adelaide Press, founded in 2009 with a mission to be an open access publisher….

Sydney University Press, which was relaunched in 2003 after closing in 1987, has employed a “hybrid approach” to open access. It is now returning to a more standard university publishing model….

Open access has an important role to play in academic publishing, but it is laughable to claim UWA Publishing’s cultural impact can simply be replaced through open access….

 

Let’s just get on with it – ?‘open’ in Australia in 2019

“This talk, given to the CAUL Research Repositories Community Days on 28 October 2019, delves into the current state of openness in Australia. It looks at some of the causes of the lack of progress and provides suggestions for ramping up activity into 2020.”

Chasing cash cows in a swamp? Perspectives on Plan S from Australia and the USA | Unlocking Research

“Rankings are a natural enemy of openness….

Australian universities are heavily financially reliant on overseas students….

University rankings are extremely important in the recruitment of overseas students….

There is incredible pressure on researchers in Australia to perform. This can take the form of reward, with many universities offering financial incentives for publication in ‘top’ journals….

For example, Griffith University’s Research and Innovation Plan 2017-2020 includes: “Maintain a Nature and Science publication incentive scheme”. Publication in these two journals comprises 20% of the score in the Academic Ranking of World Universities….”