Workshop: Global insights into Open Access and advocacy strategies. – UoN room bookings & classes – University of Newcastle Library

“Professor Ginny Barbour, Director of the Australasian Open Access Strategy Group (AOASG) will lead two discussions  to provide insight into Open Access and advocacy strategies. 

The AOASG is a national leader in open access scholarly communications with a focus on advocacy, collaboration and building capacity with Australian and New Zealand to advance open access. 

The Changing Publishing Landscape & the drivers for change 1pm-1:50pm (incl 15 min Q&A)

Overview of international trends in scholarly publishing with reference to the drivers for change towards open scholarship, including emerging models such as pre-prints and policy shifts such as Plan S 

An Australian perspective on open access, the current landscape and possible future directions including ARC & NHMRC policy

What’s in it for academics

Open discussion and Q&A…”

The open access shift at UWA Publishing is an experiment doomed to fail

“A statement released by UWA claims the changes will help “to guarantee modern university publishing into the future”, foreshadowing “a mix of print, greater digitisation and open access publishing.”…

The notion that a respected publishing house can be replaced by open access publishing is disproved by examining other Australian university presses, such as the now-closed University of Adelaide Press, founded in 2009 with a mission to be an open access publisher….

Sydney University Press, which was relaunched in 2003 after closing in 1987, has employed a “hybrid approach” to open access. It is now returning to a more standard university publishing model….

Open access has an important role to play in academic publishing, but it is laughable to claim UWA Publishing’s cultural impact can simply be replaced through open access….

 

Let’s just get on with it – ?‘open’ in Australia in 2019

“This talk, given to the CAUL Research Repositories Community Days on 28 October 2019, delves into the current state of openness in Australia. It looks at some of the causes of the lack of progress and provides suggestions for ramping up activity into 2020.”

Chasing cash cows in a swamp? Perspectives on Plan S from Australia and the USA | Unlocking Research

“Rankings are a natural enemy of openness….

Australian universities are heavily financially reliant on overseas students….

University rankings are extremely important in the recruitment of overseas students….

There is incredible pressure on researchers in Australia to perform. This can take the form of reward, with many universities offering financial incentives for publication in ‘top’ journals….

For example, Griffith University’s Research and Innovation Plan 2017-2020 includes: “Maintain a Nature and Science publication incentive scheme”. Publication in these two journals comprises 20% of the score in the Academic Ranking of World Universities….”

Publication and Dissemination of Research: A guide supporting the Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research

“Consistent with international expectations that research outputs are openly available, institutions should support researchers to ensure their research outputs are openly accessible in an institutional or other online repository, or on a publisher’s website….”

Manager Scholarly Communications

“The Manager Scholarly Communications [at the University of New South Wales] provides high-level expertise and strategic advice to the University and individual researchers on the changing modes of scholarly publishing and communication, in order to increase visibility and impact of UNSW’s scholarship and knowledge assets.

The role provides expert advice to inform the delivery of the Library’s scholarly communications services for researchers and Higher Degree Research (HDR) candidates and is responsible for supporting the University’s Open Access Policy. The scholarly communications services are designed to assist researchers to make informed choices and best leverage open access, traditional publishing and technological opportunities, when publishing their research outputs for maximum impact. The role also provides input on technological solutions that will enhance and support scholarly communication at UNSW….”

CSIRO launches open-access virtual core library – Australian Mining

“CSIRO [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation] has introduced the National Virtual Core Library (NVCL), a digitised collection of 10 million metres of drill core estimated to be archived in warehouses around Australia.

The cores are analysed using HyLogger, an automated sampling system that generates digital images, surface profiles and mineralogical interpretations.

The data is then compared and mapped with other adjacent cores to build a bigger picture of what’s underground in a given area, providing ‘a new set of eyes’ to geologists, so they can map mineral composition rapidly and objectively….”

CSIRO launches open-access virtual core library – Australian Mining

“CSIRO [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation] has introduced the National Virtual Core Library (NVCL), a digitised collection of 10 million metres of drill core estimated to be archived in warehouses around Australia.

The cores are analysed using HyLogger, an automated sampling system that generates digital images, surface profiles and mineralogical interpretations.

The data is then compared and mapped with other adjacent cores to build a bigger picture of what’s underground in a given area, providing ‘a new set of eyes’ to geologists, so they can map mineral composition rapidly and objectively….”

Disrupting medical publishing and the future of medical journals: a personal view – Gee – 2019 – Medical Journal of Australia – Wiley Online Library

“We strongly support the principle that research must be freely accessible. At the MJA [Medical Journal of Australia], we practise what we believe and make all research freely accessible from publication, a unique feature of a subscription journal. We further support the idea that subscription journals should ensure all peer?reviewed articles are freely accessible after an embargo period and suggest this period be set at no more than 24 months after final publication. We suggest that Plan S is off track in its opposition to hybrid journals. There are many metrics of quality and impact, including media (and social media) attention, but the primary currency by which research quality is judged remains citations by peers; major breakthroughs attract very high citations as the work is replicated then adapted and extended by others around the world, which is in reality how science advances and research is translated. Several of the journals with the greatest impact and highest citations will be excluded under Plan S if they maintain their current subscription models.

When it all boils down to basics, researchers want to have their research published quickly after peer and editorial review, with near perfect certainty in the most prestigious, most impactful place possible. In 2019, authors do not necessarily need a traditional subscription medical journal to achieve this goal, and if this spells the end of the subscription model, time will tell as the market decides. In the meantime and whatever our personal views, researchers will continue to seek to have their work widely read and cited, which is why the top medical journals (many of which remain subscription journals) will continue to attract the best research and will have a wide choice of what to accept….”

Libraries and Open Access

“Open Access (OA) is quickly becoming a ‘gold-standard’ for research quality internationally. A growing number of major research funders now require the outputs of the research that they support to be made OA. University libraries are playing a vital role in supporting this transition to open access. But in spite of early investment in library-based OA repositories, Australia continues to lag behind the United States and Western Europe in relation to the proportion of publications that its researchers make openly available. This project explores the intersection between cultural and implementation challenges facing libraries in Australia as they work to support a transition towards OA for research publications and data. Identifying practices and challenges specific to the Australian context, as well as opportunities to learn from international best practice in this space, will be a particular focus. Questions that the project will seek to answer include: * What do Australian librarians think researchers are doing in relation to OA? * What are Australian researchers actually doing? * How do the choices that Australian researchers make about where to deposit the OA version of their work compare to the choices made by researchers elsewhere in the world? * What do librarians think the barriers to open access are? * What do researchers think the barriers to open access are? * How do each of these groups frame their discussion of those barriers? * Where do non-institutional repositories and commercially supported services fit in? For example, are researchers using subject repositories (e.g. such as SSRN, H-Commons, or the Australian Policy Observatory) instead of institutional repositories? Are Universities choosing to pay for data deposit services like FigShare? Why? The project will draw on the large data sets and established data capabilities developed as part of the COKI project. This data provides new opportunities to explore patterns of repository choice and deposition at large scale, and to compare Australian patterns with those found elsewhere in the world. Quantitative approaches will be combined with qualitative perspectives, including surveys, interviews and ethnographic approaches….”