onthewards | a free open access medical education website

“onthewards is a free open access medical education website dedicated to creating resources for the doctors of today and tomorrow. Our educational topics are selected by junior doctors for junior doctors.

We release a podcast (onthepods) each week that can be listened to directly from the website, downloaded through our app or streamed via iTunes or your favourite podcast service. Each podcast also includes a summary of the content, written by a junior doctor….”

Australian Government Response to the Productivity Commission Inquiry into Intellectual Property Arrangements

At p. 18: “Recommendation 16.1 The Australian, and State and Territory governments should implement an open access policy for publicly funded research. The policy should provide free and open access arrangements for all publications funded by governments, directly or through university funding, within 12 months of publication. The policy should minimise exemptions. The Australian Government should seek to establish the same policy for international agencies to which it is a contributory funder, but which still charge for their publications, such as the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development….”

Open Access Strategy for a ‘New’ University Press: A View through the Stakeholder Lens | Journal of Scholarly Publishing

“Enabled by technology, brought into being in response to a crisis in scholarly communication, and increasingly driven by governmental regulations, mandates of funding bodies, and universities’ policies, open access (OA) is one of the fundamental issues that need to be considered as part of a publishing strategy and business model at a new university press. By considering the attitudes toward OA among the stakeholders of Australian university presses, I propose that a university press should take a hybrid approach to the OA publishing model to ensure diversified funding and income streams, editorial independence, and sustainability. At the same time, the press needs to maintain rigorous peer review, high-quality editing and production, and effective marketing while developing a focused publishing program in areas that are distinctive to the press and strategically aligned with the goals of its parent university.”

 

Open Education Licensing Project

“The Open Education Licensing Project was a joint research and development project undertaken by Swinburne University of Technology and the University of Tasmania in 2015/16. In 2015 the project team surveyed and collected information from managers, educators and information professionals in Australian universities about their understanding and experiences with licensing issues for open online education. On the basis of information collected, in 2016 the team developed the OEL Toolkit to support the use and development of Open Educational Resources (OER) in the Australian higher education sector….The OEL Toolkit is essentially a decision-tree web application designed support the use, creation, modifying or sharing of Open Educational Resources in the Australian higher education sector….”

Intellectual Property Arrangements, report from Australia’s Productivity Commission, December 20, 2016

From the full report, pp. 23-24: “The current policy settings for publicly-funded research, whereby recipients of funding own any resultant IP, and specialised technology transfer offices facilitate the dissemination of research results, are generally sound. However, copyright restrictions on access to publicly-funded research publications limit the dissemination of knowledge, and digitisation has significantly diminished the rationale for limiting access in this way. Publicly-funded research publications should be available to the public under open access arrangements after a 12 month embargo period….”

Also see Section 16 at p. 461: “Publication is an important mechanism for knowledge diffusion from publicly-funded research. But access to published material is often limited by copyright. ? All governments should adopt open access policies (free access once a decision to publish is taken) for the results of publicly-funded research. The Australian Government should encourage international agencies it co-funds to adopt a similar policy. ? Importantly, such an open access policy does not in itself compel publication….”

Also see Recommendation 16.1 at p. 470: “The Australian, and State and Territory governments should implement an open access policy for publicly-funded research. The policy should provide free and open access arrangements for all publications funded by governments, directly or through university funding, within 12 months of publication. The policy should minimise exemptions. The Australian Government should seek to establish the same policy for international agencies to which it is a contributory funder, but which still charge for their publications, such as the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development….”

Intellectual Property Arrangements, report from Australia’s Productivity Commission, December 20, 2016

From the full report, pp. 23-24: “The current policy settings for publicly-funded research, whereby recipients of funding own any resultant IP, and specialised technology transfer offices facilitate the dissemination of research results, are generally sound. However, copyright restrictions on access to publicly-funded research publications limit the dissemination of knowledge, and digitisation has significantly diminished the rationale for limiting access in this way. Publicly-funded research publications should be available to the public under open access arrangements after a 12 month embargo period….”

Also see Section 16 at p. 461: “Publication is an important mechanism for knowledge diffusion from publicly-funded research. But access to published material is often limited by copyright. ? All governments should adopt open access policies (free access once a decision to publish is taken) for the results of publicly-funded research. The Australian Government should encourage international agencies it co-funds to adopt a similar policy. ? Importantly, such an open access policy does not in itself compel publication….”

Also see Recommendation 16.1 at p. 470: “The Australian, and State and Territory governments should implement an open access policy for publicly-funded research. The policy should provide free and open access arrangements for all publications funded by governments, directly or through university funding, within 12 months of publication. The policy should minimise exemptions. The Australian Government should seek to establish the same policy for international agencies to which it is a contributory funder, but which still charge for their publications, such as the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development….”

De-identification/re-identification – what’s all the fuss about? – Lexology

“Recently, Attorney-General George Brandis announced that he intends to introduce to Parliament amendments to the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) that would make it a criminal offence to re-identify Commonwealth Government data that has been stripped of identifying markers. Under the proposed amendments, it would also be an offence to counsel, procure, facilitate, or encourage anyone to re-identify Commonwealth Government data, and to publish or communicate any re-identified dataset. It is understood that researchers will be exempt from prosecution under the proposed new regime….”

De-identification/re-identification – what’s all the fuss about? – Lexology

“Recently, Attorney-General George Brandis announced that he intends to introduce to Parliament amendments to the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) that would make it a criminal offence to re-identify Commonwealth Government data that has been stripped of identifying markers. Under the proposed amendments, it would also be an offence to counsel, procure, facilitate, or encourage anyone to re-identify Commonwealth Government data, and to publish or communicate any re-identified dataset. It is understood that researchers will be exempt from prosecution under the proposed new regime….”

SCS eNews: How do researchers experience Open Access?

“A research team at QUT is looking for Australian academic researchers who have used open access sources and content to develop an understanding of their information literacy experience. 

Your participation will involve taking part in a 30 to 60 minutes audio recorded interview via Skype. You will also be asked a few short questions (e.g. school, research topic) and to complete a written consent form. …”