Publication and Dissemination of Research: A guide supporting the Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research

“Consistent with international expectations that research outputs are openly available, institutions should support researchers to ensure their research outputs are openly accessible in an institutional or other online repository, or on a publisher’s website….”

Manager Scholarly Communications

“The Manager Scholarly Communications [at the University of New South Wales] provides high-level expertise and strategic advice to the University and individual researchers on the changing modes of scholarly publishing and communication, in order to increase visibility and impact of UNSW’s scholarship and knowledge assets.

The role provides expert advice to inform the delivery of the Library’s scholarly communications services for researchers and Higher Degree Research (HDR) candidates and is responsible for supporting the University’s Open Access Policy. The scholarly communications services are designed to assist researchers to make informed choices and best leverage open access, traditional publishing and technological opportunities, when publishing their research outputs for maximum impact. The role also provides input on technological solutions that will enhance and support scholarly communication at UNSW….”

CSIRO launches open-access virtual core library – Australian Mining

“CSIRO [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation] has introduced the National Virtual Core Library (NVCL), a digitised collection of 10 million metres of drill core estimated to be archived in warehouses around Australia.

The cores are analysed using HyLogger, an automated sampling system that generates digital images, surface profiles and mineralogical interpretations.

The data is then compared and mapped with other adjacent cores to build a bigger picture of what’s underground in a given area, providing ‘a new set of eyes’ to geologists, so they can map mineral composition rapidly and objectively….”

CSIRO launches open-access virtual core library – Australian Mining

“CSIRO [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation] has introduced the National Virtual Core Library (NVCL), a digitised collection of 10 million metres of drill core estimated to be archived in warehouses around Australia.

The cores are analysed using HyLogger, an automated sampling system that generates digital images, surface profiles and mineralogical interpretations.

The data is then compared and mapped with other adjacent cores to build a bigger picture of what’s underground in a given area, providing ‘a new set of eyes’ to geologists, so they can map mineral composition rapidly and objectively….”

Disrupting medical publishing and the future of medical journals: a personal view – Gee – 2019 – Medical Journal of Australia – Wiley Online Library

“We strongly support the principle that research must be freely accessible. At the MJA [Medical Journal of Australia], we practise what we believe and make all research freely accessible from publication, a unique feature of a subscription journal. We further support the idea that subscription journals should ensure all peer?reviewed articles are freely accessible after an embargo period and suggest this period be set at no more than 24 months after final publication. We suggest that Plan S is off track in its opposition to hybrid journals. There are many metrics of quality and impact, including media (and social media) attention, but the primary currency by which research quality is judged remains citations by peers; major breakthroughs attract very high citations as the work is replicated then adapted and extended by others around the world, which is in reality how science advances and research is translated. Several of the journals with the greatest impact and highest citations will be excluded under Plan S if they maintain their current subscription models.

When it all boils down to basics, researchers want to have their research published quickly after peer and editorial review, with near perfect certainty in the most prestigious, most impactful place possible. In 2019, authors do not necessarily need a traditional subscription medical journal to achieve this goal, and if this spells the end of the subscription model, time will tell as the market decides. In the meantime and whatever our personal views, researchers will continue to seek to have their work widely read and cited, which is why the top medical journals (many of which remain subscription journals) will continue to attract the best research and will have a wide choice of what to accept….”

Libraries and Open Access

“Open Access (OA) is quickly becoming a ‘gold-standard’ for research quality internationally. A growing number of major research funders now require the outputs of the research that they support to be made OA. University libraries are playing a vital role in supporting this transition to open access. But in spite of early investment in library-based OA repositories, Australia continues to lag behind the United States and Western Europe in relation to the proportion of publications that its researchers make openly available. This project explores the intersection between cultural and implementation challenges facing libraries in Australia as they work to support a transition towards OA for research publications and data. Identifying practices and challenges specific to the Australian context, as well as opportunities to learn from international best practice in this space, will be a particular focus. Questions that the project will seek to answer include: * What do Australian librarians think researchers are doing in relation to OA? * What are Australian researchers actually doing? * How do the choices that Australian researchers make about where to deposit the OA version of their work compare to the choices made by researchers elsewhere in the world? * What do librarians think the barriers to open access are? * What do researchers think the barriers to open access are? * How do each of these groups frame their discussion of those barriers? * Where do non-institutional repositories and commercially supported services fit in? For example, are researchers using subject repositories (e.g. such as SSRN, H-Commons, or the Australian Policy Observatory) instead of institutional repositories? Are Universities choosing to pay for data deposit services like FigShare? Why? The project will draw on the large data sets and established data capabilities developed as part of the COKI project. This data provides new opportunities to explore patterns of repository choice and deposition at large scale, and to compare Australian patterns with those found elsewhere in the world. Quantitative approaches will be combined with qualitative perspectives, including surveys, interviews and ethnographic approaches….”

Sydney Open Research Network

The Sydney Open Research Network is a collection of researchers and research-associated workers in Sydney, Australia. It aims to facilitate the growth of open practices by bringing together independently motivated and like-minded people, and providing a platform for the sharing of resources. The network is inspired by the Open Science Community Utrecht, and the site is adapted from the Melbourne Open Research Network site. …”

Australia and New Zealand Open Research Network

The Australia and New Zealand Open Research Network is a collection of researchers and research-associated workers. In practice, ANZORN is a network of local networks distributed without Australia and New Zealand. It aims to facilitate the growth of Open practices by bringing together independently motivated and like-minded people, and providing a platform for the sharing of resources. …”

Melbourne Open Research Network

The Melbourne Open Research Network [MORN] is a collection of researchers and research-associated workers in Melbourne, Australia. It aims to facilitate the growth of Open practices by bringing together independently motivated and like-minded people, and providing a platform for the sharing of resources. It is further supported by the Australia and New Zealand Open Research Network (ANZORN). …”

What happens when books enter the public domain? Testing copyright’s underuse hypothesis across Australia, New Zealand, the United States and Canada by Rebecca Giblin :: SSRN

Abstract:  The United States (‘US’) extended most copyright terms by 20 years in 1998, and has since exported that extension via ‘free trade’ agreements to countries including Australia and Canada. A key justification for the longer term was the claim that exclusive rights are necessary to encourage publishers to invest in making older works available — and that, unless such rights were granted, they would go underused. This study empirically tests this ‘underuse hypothesis’ by investigating the relative availability of ebooks to public libraries across Australia, New Zealand, the US and Canada. We find that books are actually less available where they are under copyright than where they are in the public domain, and that commercial publishers seem undeterred from investing in works even where others are competing to supply the same titles. We also find that exclusive rights do not appear to trigger investment in works that have low commercial demand, with books from 59% of the ‘culturally valuable’ authors we sampled unavailable in any jurisdiction, regardless of copyright status. This provides new evidence of how even the shortest copyright terms can outlast works’ commercial value, even where cultural value remains. Further, we find that works are priced much higher where they are under copyright than where they in the public domain, and these differences typically far exceed what would be paid to authors or their heirs. Thus, one effect of extending copyrights from life + 50 to life + 70 is that libraries are obliged to pay higher prices in exchange for worse access.

This is the first published study to test the underuse hypothesis outside the US, and the first to analyse comparative availability of identical works across jurisdictions where their copyright status differs. It adds to the evidence that the underuse hypothesis is not borne out by real world practice. Nonetheless, countries are still being obliged to enact extended terms as a cost of trade access. We argue that such nations should explore alternative ways of dividing up those rights to better achieve copyright’s fundamental aims of rewarding authors and promoting widespread access to knowledge and culture.