A database of zooplankton biomass in Australian marine waters – PubMed

Abstract:  Zooplankton biomass data have been collected in Australian waters since the 1930s, yet most datasets have been unavailable to the research community. We have searched archives, scanned the primary and grey literature, and contacted researchers, to collate 49187 records of marine zooplankton biomass from waters around Australia (0-60°S, 110-160°E). Many of these datasets are relatively small, but when combined, they provide >85 years of zooplankton biomass data for Australian waters from 1932 to the present. Data have been standardised and all available metadata included. We have lodged this dataset with the Australian Ocean Data Network, allowing full public access. The Australian Zooplankton Biomass Database will be valuable for global change studies, research assessing trophic linkages, and for initialising and assessing biogeochemical and ecosystem models of lower trophic levels.

 

Supporting Academic Research: Understanding the challenges

“While making publications available openly is not the main priority in the research office, researchers’ support for making their own work openly available is growing….

Beyond Open Access and publications, more strategic alliances would be beneficial for both the research office and the library….

7% of research office staff reported that ensuring research is available openly is one of the top three priorities for their office. However, many referred to this as something for which they share responsibility with researchers and other departments within their institution. …

Open Access is the largest area of collaboration between the research office and the library, demonstrating the library’s role in complementing the research office’s priorities and areas of expertise. 35% of research office staff want greater collaboration with the library. Better systems for identifying publications and updating research profiles may be beneficial for enabling a collaborative focus on key priority areas for both parties….

Research office members are contributing more heavily to helping researchers find and apply for funding, and, to a lesser extent, monitoring the impact of their work. On the other hand, the library is helping more with depositing publications to institutional repositories and with Open Access compliance. …”

The final version of the RDA COVID-19 Recommendations and Guidelines for Data Sharing, published 30 June 2020 | RDA

“The Research Data Alliance (RDA) COVID-19 Working Group members bring various, global expertise to develop a body of work that comprises how data from multiple disciplines inform response to a pandemic combined with guidelines and recommendations on data sharing under the present COVID-19 cicumstances.  This extends to research software sharing, in recognition of the key role in software in analysing data.  The work has been divided into four research areas (namely, clinical, omics, epidemiology, social sciences) with four cross cutting themes (namely, community participation, indigenous data, legal and ethical considerations, research software), as a way to focus the conversations, and provide an initial set of guidelines in a tight timeframe.  The detailed guidelines are aimed to help stakeholders follow best practices to maximise the efficiency of their work, and to act as a blueprint for future emergencies.  The recommendations in the document are aimed at helping policymakers and funders to maximise timely, quality data sharing and appropriate responses in such health emergencies.

This work was executed in an intense period over just over 6 weeks, with five iterations, all of which were opened for public community comment.  Draft releases and comments are avaialable here (https://doi.org/10.15497/rda00046). …”

Helping data make a difference – ARDC

“In late March, when the European Commission asked the Research Data Alliance (RDA) to develop a set of global guidelines and recommendations for data sharing in response to the crisis, Kheeran Dharmawardena served as one of the moderators in the community participation theme.

Kheeran has been addressing the gap between information infrastructure and users over the past two decades. His background includes providing ICT services across the higher education and research sectors, including Monash University, the University of Melbourne, ARDC’s Nectar Research Cloud and the Atlas of Living Australia. He’s currently the principle consultant at Cytrax Consulting and also co-chairs the Virtual Research Environments and the Social Dynamics of Data Interoperability interest groups at the RDA. He also founded and co-chairs the Australian Geospatial Capabilities community of practice.

 

Following the RDA’s publication of its report, COVID-19 Recommendations and Guidelines for Data Sharing, Dharmawardena provided some insight on the project and the importance of data access….”

Industry Report Reveals Challenges among Researchers and Research Office Leaders during COVID-19

“Ex Libris, a ProQuest company, is pleased to announce the publication of its annual study on the challenges that academic researchers face, the priorities of research office leaders, and key opportunities for research offices and libraries to support scholarship at institutions of higher education.

The study was commissioned by Ex Libris and conducted by Alterline, an independent research agency. The report presents findings from a survey of 314 researchers across a range of disciplines and 101 senior members of research offices in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia….

Senior members of research offices want to strengthen relationships with the library. The top areas of collaboration between the research office and the library consist of open-access compliance (noted by 64% of respondents), the tracking of publications by the institution’s researchers (46%), and the updating of researcher profiles (32%).
Researchers’ support for open access is growing. Before COVID-19, 72% of researchers viewed open access favorably, and 18% now report that they view open access more positively since the onset of COVID-19….”

Australian Law Librarians’ Association :: Open Educational Resources and Scholarship in Law and Legal Studies: the State of Play

“This session will discuss key developments in the worlds of Open Educational Resources (OER) and Open Access in research. Steven Chang and Thomas Shafee from La Trobe University will provide an overview of the key benefits and challenges/solutions in the context of Law and Legal Studies, situated within the bigger picture of recent developments in open access publishing and open data. This will lay the foundations of how law librarianship can be future-ready in the rapidly changing teaching and research landscape….”

Data analyst/visualisation expert needed – Hblog.org

“Tamson Pietsch, Head of the Centre for Public History at UTS and I are leading a small pilot project at UTS to analyse Wikipedia’s scope and progress over the past twenty years in Australia together with collaborators, Wikimedia Australia

<https://wikimedia.org.au/wiki/Wikimedia_Australia> (including Pru Mitchell and 99of9|Toby Hudson). We are looking for someone to help us to develop a series of visualisations for a pilot project. This will involve extracting data about en.wp.org articles (either from Wikipedia or via Wikidata) and comparing it to another dataset (possibly the Australian Honours List),
cleaning and coding data and, importantly, visualising the data using mapping and other visualisation tools. This is a pilot project with resources for a few days work which we would ideally like to happen over the next month. Experience with Wikimedia data analysis is a plus….”

Open access is the new normal: it makes more ways to value research | Campus Morning Mail

“Academics have been eagerly assigning copyright to their most precious research findings to private companies for years, in exchange for the opportunity to be published in well-known journals. This has resulted in most research being locked away behind paywalls.

Many research funders now require the work that they support to be published open access, with one group of funders pushing harder than most under an agreement called Plan S. But policing the open access requirements of grant funding has been technically challenging; and individual researchers remain under pressure to publish in high-prestige journals. As a result, progress has been patchy and copyright in research articles continues to be signed over to paywalled journals.

This month, Plan S funders announced that they will require that authors retain the copyright in publications that result from Plan S funded research. This means that authors no longer have the right to sign over copyright in their research outputs to a journal when they publish. It removes one of the last barriers for funders to require that the research they fund must be made open access  immediately upon publication….”

CAUL and AOASG welcome cOAlition S Rights Retention Strategy | CAUL

“The Council of Australian University Librarians (CAUL) and the Australasian Open Access Strategy Group (AOASG) welcome the Rights Retention Strategy announced by cOAlition S on 15 July 2020.

The strategy is a significant and bold step towards ensuring the achievement of 100% immediate open access for all research articles. It strengthens the repository-based route for open access and will ensure that by retaining their rights to their own work, authors are able to use and re-use their work as they choose.  In essence, the strategy is designed to support cOAlition S funded researchers seeking to publish in their journal of choice, including any subscription journal. This strategy provides authors with a standard mechanism to retain the rights to their research by placing  a CC-BY license on the author’s accepted version which allows them to make this version immediately available on final publication in an open access repository of their choice. 

Repository-based open access has been the preferred route for open access by universities in Australia and New Zealand since 2000 and is supported by the two main Australian funders of research, the ARC and the NHMRC. Advocacy efforts by CAUL and the AOASG have supported this repository-based approach. …”

Intellectual property rights retention in scholarly works at Australian universities

“Rights retention in scholarly works can include a spectrum of copyright arrangements, reuse rights, and machine readability4 . Copyright retention by authors or universities for scholarly works is becoming preferred by some funders and advocates. Ideally, these changes would take place on the national level. However, recommendations for legislative or national policy change are outside the scope of this report as they require extensive consultation with stakeholders and government. This briefing report has therefore focused on the potential to achieve reuse rights retention in institutional IP policies only….”