Tear Down That Paywall: The Movement to Make Ocean Research Free — Oceans Deeply

“As scientists race to save coral reefs and tackle other crucial marine issues, access to expensive scientific journals has become a roadblock to sharing knowledge, especially for researchers in developing countries….

…Open Communications for The Ocean (OCTO), a Woodinville, Washington-based nonprofit that recently launched a marine science research “repository” called MarXiv. Its goal is to systematically make more marine research freely accessible….”

CC & Government Guide: Using Creative Commons 3.0 Australia Licences on Government Copyright Materials – Version details – Trove

“This guide explains how copyright law applies to Australian government material, how copyright can be managed to facilitate beneficial open access practices by government, how CC licenses can be used to achieve open access to government material, and provides practical step-by-step guidance for agencies and their officers on licensing and use of government copyright materials under CC 3.0 Australia licences.”

Beijing Hinders Free Speech in America – The New York Times

“Springer Nature, which publishes prestigious science magazines like Nature, recently blocked access to some articles from China to avoid being banned in the country….

Recently, Clive Hamilton, a professor of public ethics in Australia, said that his publisher [Allen & Unwin] delayed the release of a book of his that investigates the rising influence of the Chinese Communist Party in Australia for fear that the Chinese government may sue for defamation. ….”

These threats to free speech should prompt Western politicians to stand up to China. I’m disappointed that President Trump chose to focus mainly on trade, rather than human rights, during his recent trip to China. There appear to have been no attempts to push back against Beijing’s increasing proclivity to commit rights abuses beyond its borders. Such appeasement will only embolden Mr. Xi, further threatening Western democratic institutions. 

In recent months, the Trump administration has restarted talks with its allies in Asia about how to counter China’s growing assertiveness in the region. It is equally important for the United States to shore up its policies at home to stop China from undermining core democratic values — both on campus and beyond….”

Beijing Hinders Free Speech in America – The New York Times

“Springer Nature, which publishes prestigious science magazines like Nature, recently blocked access to some articles from China to avoid being banned in the country….

Recently, Clive Hamilton, a professor of public ethics in Australia, said that his publisher [Allen & Unwin] delayed the release of a book of his that investigates the rising influence of the Chinese Communist Party in Australia for fear that the Chinese government may sue for defamation. ….”

These threats to free speech should prompt Western politicians to stand up to China. I’m disappointed that President Trump chose to focus mainly on trade, rather than human rights, during his recent trip to China. There appear to have been no attempts to push back against Beijing’s increasing proclivity to commit rights abuses beyond its borders. Such appeasement will only embolden Mr. Xi, further threatening Western democratic institutions. 

In recent months, the Trump administration has restarted talks with its allies in Asia about how to counter China’s growing assertiveness in the region. It is equally important for the United States to shore up its policies at home to stop China from undermining core democratic values — both on campus and beyond….”

onthewards | a free open access medical education website

“onthewards is a free open access medical education website dedicated to creating resources for the doctors of today and tomorrow. Our educational topics are selected by junior doctors for junior doctors.

We release a podcast (onthepods) each week that can be listened to directly from the website, downloaded through our app or streamed via iTunes or your favourite podcast service. Each podcast also includes a summary of the content, written by a junior doctor….”

Australian Government Response to the Productivity Commission Inquiry into Intellectual Property Arrangements

At p. 18: “Recommendation 16.1 The Australian, and State and Territory governments should implement an open access policy for publicly funded research. The policy should provide free and open access arrangements for all publications funded by governments, directly or through university funding, within 12 months of publication. The policy should minimise exemptions. The Australian Government should seek to establish the same policy for international agencies to which it is a contributory funder, but which still charge for their publications, such as the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development….”

Open Access Strategy for a ‘New’ University Press: A View through the Stakeholder Lens | Journal of Scholarly Publishing

“Enabled by technology, brought into being in response to a crisis in scholarly communication, and increasingly driven by governmental regulations, mandates of funding bodies, and universities’ policies, open access (OA) is one of the fundamental issues that need to be considered as part of a publishing strategy and business model at a new university press. By considering the attitudes toward OA among the stakeholders of Australian university presses, I propose that a university press should take a hybrid approach to the OA publishing model to ensure diversified funding and income streams, editorial independence, and sustainability. At the same time, the press needs to maintain rigorous peer review, high-quality editing and production, and effective marketing while developing a focused publishing program in areas that are distinctive to the press and strategically aligned with the goals of its parent university.”

 

Open Education Licensing Project

“The Open Education Licensing Project was a joint research and development project undertaken by Swinburne University of Technology and the University of Tasmania in 2015/16. In 2015 the project team surveyed and collected information from managers, educators and information professionals in Australian universities about their understanding and experiences with licensing issues for open online education. On the basis of information collected, in 2016 the team developed the OEL Toolkit to support the use and development of Open Educational Resources (OER) in the Australian higher education sector….The OEL Toolkit is essentially a decision-tree web application designed support the use, creation, modifying or sharing of Open Educational Resources in the Australian higher education sector….”