Survey: Patients Regard Open Access to Their Medical Records as Critical to Receiving High Quality Health Care | Business Wire

“CAMPBELL, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–In the era of digital health, patients have very high expectations for medical information sharing, but they may not be aware of the health care industry’s current limitations. That’s according to a new digital health survey released today by Transcend Insights, a population health management company. The survey found that a vast majority of patients (97 percent) believe it is important for any health institution, regardless of type or location, to have access to their full medical history in order to receive high-quality care.

Patients were also asked to rate factors that are most important to receiving personalized care. Top priorities for patients included having access to their own medical records (92 percent) and the ability for care providers to easily share and receive important information about their medical history—wherever they needed treatment (93 percent).

Are these demands being met? The survey suggests that there could be a significant gap between the level of information sharing that patients expect and what is possible today. While the health care industry has undergone rapid digitization in the last decade, effectively sharing medical information and communicating across many different health care information technology systems — often referred to as interoperability — has remained elusive.

According to a recent interoperability study conducted by the American Hospital Association, only a quarter of all hospitals are able to functionally exchange (find, send, receive and use) clinical information with external providers. Another study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that only 34.8 percent of specialists receive information about a patient from their referring primary care physician (PCP), even when the PCP attempts to share patient records. In other words, data is not traveling with patients despite the importance that they place on open access to their information.”

Budapest Open Access Initiative | BOAI15

“The 15th anniversary of the BOAI offers an opportunity to take stock of our collective progress. To do this, feedback was solicited through an open survey, and we received responses from 69 countries around the world. Additionally, we have convened a small working group to synthesize the community feedback and use it to reflect on the values, impact, and continued relevance of the BOAI. The Working Group will review and digest the responses received and provide updated recommendations to reflect the current status of the movement. Later this week, we’re looking forward to the release of a comprehensive reflection on where the open access movement has been and where it may be headed, written by Jean-Claude Guédon, one of the original drafters of the BOAI, and a noted thought leader in the open access community. In the meantime, watch the BOAI 15 twitter feed (@TheBOAI) and #TheBOAI starting today for a series of tweets showcasing some of the reactions collected from the wider Open community on the impact of the BOAI and on open access in general. As recommendations are formulated, these will be supplemented with more action-oriented items from members of the BOAI 15 Working Group….”

Managing the Transitional Impact of Open Access Journals

Abstract:  The explosion of open access (OA) journals in recent years has not only impacted on how libraries manage contents and budgets, but also the choice of journals for academic researcher submission of their article for publication. A study conducted at the University of Hong Kong indicated that academic researchers have a gradual tendency in shifting some of their publications toward OA journals, and interestingly the shifts are discipline specific. While OA does offer an alternative to the unsustainable pricing of serials and supports a core value of ensuring openness to knowledge, the perceived value toward the impact of OA journals are still lacking consensus among stakeholders. 

 

 The aims of this study are to better understand from the perspective of academic researchers in 4 broad disciplines—Health Science, Life Science, Physical Science and Social Science, their preferences in paper submission. Data on actual article submission trends at HKU will be analyzed together with qualitative feedback from researchers to examine the trend and incentive in shifting toward OA publishing in different disciplines. Researcher’s attitude will be understood within the context of the university’s open policy and research assessment, as well as the current OA landscape to inform the scholarly communication trend going forward.

What are the personal and professional characteristics that distinguish the researchers who publish in high- and low-impact journals? A multi-national web-based survey. ecancermedicalscience – The open access journal from the European Institute of Oncology and the OCEI

Abstract:  Purpose: This study identifies the personal and professional profiles of researchers with a greater potential to publish high-impact academic articles.

Method: The study involved conducting an international survey of journal authors using a web-based questionnaire. The survey examined personal characteristics, funding, and the perceived barriers of research quality, work-life balance, and satisfaction and motivation in relation to career. The processes of manuscript writing and journal publication were measured using an online questionnaire that was developed for this study. The responses were compared between the two groups of researchers using logistic regression models.

Results: A total of 269 questionnaires were analysed. The researchers shared some common perceptions; both groups reported that they were seeking recognition (or to be leaders in their areas) rather than financial remuneration. Furthermore, both groups identified time and funding constraints as the main obstacles to their scientific activities. The amount of time that was spent on research activities, having >5 graduate students under supervision, never using text editing services prior to the publication of articles, and living in a developed and English-speaking country were the independent variables that were associated with their article getting a greater chance of publishing in a high-impact journal. In contrast, using one’s own resources to perform studies decreased the chance of publishing in high-impact journals.

Conclusions: The researchers who publish in high-impact journals have distinct profiles compared with the researchers who publish in low-impact journals. English language abilities and the actual amount of time that is dedicated to research and scientific writing, as well as aspects that relate to the availability of financial resources are the factors that are associated with a successful researcher’s profile.

New study explores disparities between researchers who publish in high-and low-impact journals

“A new study surveying authors from a range of countries investigates the crucial differences between authors who publish in high- and low-impact factor medical journals. This original research shows that the growth of open access hasn’t significantly changed the publishing landscape as regards impact factor….”

National survey begins today to gather data on academic journal usage | UToday | University of Calgary

In light of a budgetary crisis that has forced post-secondary institutions across Canada to cancel a range of subscriptions to academic journals, the Canadian Research Knowledge Network (CRKN) has launched its first-ever national survey to gather data that will inform future decisions….“Data gathered during this survey will help the University of Calgary and other Canadian institutions make evidence-based decisions when confronted with the need to cancel journals because of budgetary constraints,” explains Tom Hickerson, vice-provost (Libraries and Cultural Resources)….”

Budapest Open Access Initiative | BOAI15 survey

“Almost 15 years ago, the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI) brought together a diverse group of stakeholders and launched a worldwide campaign for Open Access (OA) to all new peer ­reviewed research. The BOAI deliberately drew together existing projects to explore how they might “work together to achieve broader, deeper, and faster success.” …As we near the 15th anniversary of the BOAI, we’re no longer at the beginning nor are we yet at the end of this global campaign. Again, we will take time to reflect on the values, impact, and continued relevance of the BOAI. Please take this opportunity to reflect and fill in the survey to begin a discussion on the BOAI at 15….”

Budapest Open Access Initiative | BOAI15 survey

“Almost 15 years ago, the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI) brought together a diverse group of stakeholders and launched a worldwide campaign for Open Access (OA) to all new peer ­reviewed research. The BOAI deliberately drew together existing projects to explore how they might “work together to achieve broader, deeper, and faster success.” …As we near the 15th anniversary of the BOAI, we’re no longer at the beginning nor are we yet at the end of this global campaign. Again, we will take time to reflect on the values, impact, and continued relevance of the BOAI. Please take this opportunity to reflect and fill in the survey to begin a discussion on the BOAI at 15….”