Freeing the Textbook: Educational Resources in U.S. Higher Education, 2018

Key findings from the report include: • Faculty awareness of OER has increased every year, with 46 percent of faculty now aware of open educational resources, up from 34 percent three years ago. • For the first time, more faculty express a preference for digital material over print in the classroom. 61 percent of all faculty, 71 percent of those teaching large enrollment introductory courses, and 73 percent of department chairpersons, “Strongly Agree” or “Agree” that “the cost of course materials is a serious problem for my students.” • Department chairpersons overwhelmingly believe that making textbooks less expensive for students would be the most important improvement to course materials. • Less than one-in-five faculty members are aware of any departmental-, institution-, or system-level initiative to deal with the cost of course materials. • Faculty are acting independently to control costs by supporting used textbooks and rental programs, placing copies on reserve, and selecting materials based on cost. • Overall faculty satisfaction with required textbooks is high, with over 80 percent either “Extremely Satisfied” or “Moderately Satisfied.” That said, faculty express considerable resentment about price, unnecessary frequent updates, and other issues with commercial textbooks. • Faculty often make changes to their textbooks, presenting material in a different order (70 percent), skipping sections (68 percent), replacing content with their own (45 percent), replacing with content from others (41 percent), correcting errors (21 percent), or revising textbook material (20 percent)….”

Freeing the Textbook: Educational Resources in U.S. Higher Education, 2018

Key findings from the report include: • Faculty awareness of OER has increased every year, with 46 percent of faculty now aware of open educational resources, up from 34 percent three years ago. • For the first time, more faculty express a preference for digital material over print in the classroom. 61 percent of all faculty, 71 percent of those teaching large enrollment introductory courses, and 73 percent of department chairpersons, “Strongly Agree” or “Agree” that “the cost of course materials is a serious problem for my students.” • Department chairpersons overwhelmingly believe that making textbooks less expensive for students would be the most important improvement to course materials. • Less than one-in-five faculty members are aware of any departmental-, institution-, or system-level initiative to deal with the cost of course materials. • Faculty are acting independently to control costs by supporting used textbooks and rental programs, placing copies on reserve, and selecting materials based on cost. • Overall faculty satisfaction with required textbooks is high, with over 80 percent either “Extremely Satisfied” or “Moderately Satisfied.” That said, faculty express considerable resentment about price, unnecessary frequent updates, and other issues with commercial textbooks. • Faculty often make changes to their textbooks, presenting material in a different order (70 percent), skipping sections (68 percent), replacing content with their own (45 percent), replacing with content from others (41 percent), correcting errors (21 percent), or revising textbook material (20 percent)….”

How society publishers can accelerate their transition to open access and align with Plan S – Wise – 2020 – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  Wellcome, UK Research and Innovation, and the Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers commissioned Information Power Ltd. to undertake a project to support society publishers to accelerate their transition to open access (OA) in alignment with Plan S and the wider move to accelerate immediate OA. This project is part of a range of activities that cOAlition S partners are taking forward to support the implementation of Plan S principles. The objective of this project was to explore with learned societies a range of potential strategies and business models through which they could adapt and thrive under Plan S. We consulted with society publishers through interviews, surveys, and workshops about the 27 business models and strategies identified during the project. We also surveyed library consortia about their willingness to support society publishers to make the transition to OA. Our key finding is that transformative agreements emerge as the most promising model because they offer a predictable, steady funding stream. We also facilitated pilot transformative agreement negotiations between several society publishers and library consortia. These pilots and a workshop of consortium representatives and society publishers informed the development of an OA transformative agreement toolkit. Our conclusion is that society publishers should consider all the business models this project has developed and should not automatically equate OA with article publication charges.

 

Building new societies: Insights and predictions from the 5th Wiley Society Member Survey – Roscoe – 2020 – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

“Ten years ago, research conducted by the Biosciences Federation found that 60% of responders said they read OA journals, and 25% said that they published in them. Although a minority had claimed to have published in more than one OA journal, ‘they were not always able to distinguish between (fully or optionally) OA journals and other resources’ (Morris & Thorn, 2009). In fact, 31% of the journals mentioned were not OA journals at all. Over the course of our annual surveys, we have seen the understanding and significance of OA increase. In this year’s survey, 80% recognized the description of open research and 78% open science, for example, and only hybrid OA received the relatively low recognition rating of 61%. OA has moved from being a side issue to one of central importance, particularly among students, ECRs, and those in Africa and Central Asia. In last year’s survey, supporting OA was the sixth most important thing a society should do (65%), far behind publishing a journal (89%) and providing education and training (83%). In the current survey, it is the top service of which members want to see more. There is less interest in the USA (47%) and among senior members (61%), but if you are a student (85%) based in Africa (84%) or have less than 5?years’ experience (75%), then increased OA publishing is a major motivation towards society membership (see Fig. 6)….”

Building new societies: Insights and predictions from the 5th Wiley Society Member Survey – Roscoe – 2020 – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

“Ten years ago, research conducted by the Biosciences Federation found that 60% of responders said they read OA journals, and 25% said that they published in them. Although a minority had claimed to have published in more than one OA journal, ‘they were not always able to distinguish between (fully or optionally) OA journals and other resources’ (Morris & Thorn, 2009). In fact, 31% of the journals mentioned were not OA journals at all. Over the course of our annual surveys, we have seen the understanding and significance of OA increase. In this year’s survey, 80% recognized the description of open research and 78% open science, for example, and only hybrid OA received the relatively low recognition rating of 61%. OA has moved from being a side issue to one of central importance, particularly among students, ECRs, and those in Africa and Central Asia. In last year’s survey, supporting OA was the sixth most important thing a society should do (65%), far behind publishing a journal (89%) and providing education and training (83%). In the current survey, it is the top service of which members want to see more. There is less interest in the USA (47%) and among senior members (61%), but if you are a student (85%) based in Africa (84%) or have less than 5?years’ experience (75%), then increased OA publishing is a major motivation towards society membership (see Fig. 6)….”

Perceptions and beliefs of academic librarians in Germany and the USA: a comparative study

“The German respondents felt it more likely (by ½ point) than those in the USA that attracting a new generation to the profession will become more difficult, and that for scholarly articles, Open Access will emerge as the predominant publishing model. The American respondents felt it more likely (by ? of a point) than those in Germany that one or a few commercial entities will dominate the global scientific information infrastructure, and that libraries will be forced to reduce purchasing or subscribing to publisher-controlled information sources due to their rising costs….

The German respondents think it more likely that it will become more difficult to attract young people to it, and that Open Access will become the predominant scholarly article publishing model, than their American colleagues. The respondents in the USA, on the other hand, see greater likelihood than those in Germany that large parts of the global scientific information infrastructure will become dominated by one or a few commercial entities, and that rising costs of publisher-controlled information sources will force libraries to reduce their purchases/subscriptions….”

EOI: South Asian Journals Editors for AmeliCA

“Supported by UNESCO, CLACSO & Redalyc, this AmeliCA XML is compliant with JATS standards and helps all the scholarly journals that promote a non-profit publishing model to preserve the scholarly and open nature of scientific communication.

The AmeliCA XML helps to produce HTML, ePUB, PDF etc versions which the scholarly societies can use and make their journals more visible worldwide over internet. And also get their publications preserved and communicate with other platforms.

With this background, I am proposing that lets all join together in building not for profit scholarly publishing ecosystem. The journals in South Asia which are traditional print only are not slowly moving towards online and open access but their native publications are only in PDF formats.

I am sure and confident that the journals when adopt and use the AmeliCA XML, the journal articles will be better formatted and are available for interoperable and sharing.

The journal of Horticultural Sciences (JHS) ISSN 0973-354X https://jhs.iihr.res.in/index.php/jhs/about from India had recently joined AmeliCA and is now in the process of publishing its articles using AmeliCA XML markup language.

Similarly, if the journal editors from South Asia are willing to use AmeliCA XML may please express their interest by filling the form at http://bit.ly/S4Amelica. We may get offline or online meeting/workshop and capacity building for the same.”

EOI: South Asian Journals Editors for AmeliCA

“Supported by UNESCO, CLACSO & Redalyc, this AmeliCA XML is compliant with JATS standards and helps all the scholarly journals that promote a non-profit publishing model to preserve the scholarly and open nature of scientific communication.

The AmeliCA XML helps to produce HTML, ePUB, PDF etc versions which the scholarly societies can use and make their journals more visible worldwide over internet. And also get their publications preserved and communicate with other platforms.

With this background, I am proposing that lets all join together in building not for profit scholarly publishing ecosystem. The journals in South Asia which are traditional print only are not slowly moving towards online and open access but their native publications are only in PDF formats.

I am sure and confident that the journals when adopt and use the AmeliCA XML, the journal articles will be better formatted and are available for interoperable and sharing.

The journal of Horticultural Sciences (JHS) ISSN 0973-354X https://jhs.iihr.res.in/index.php/jhs/about from India had recently joined AmeliCA and is now in the process of publishing its articles using AmeliCA XML markup language.

Similarly, if the journal editors from South Asia are willing to use AmeliCA XML may please express their interest by filling the form at http://bit.ly/S4Amelica. We may get offline or online meeting/workshop and capacity building for the same.”

Guidance for research organisations on how to implement the principles of the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment | Wellcome

The draft guidance […] provides information for Wellcome-funded organisations on how to implement the core principles of the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA).

We want to hear your comments and feedback on this guidance, before we publish an updated and final version in spring 2020. Fill in our short survey (opens in a new tab) by 17:00 GMT, 24 February 2020. 

“Role of Librarian in Promoting Open Access Study of Indian Librarians Community” by vrushali Dandawate

Abstract:  From long time open access has become important for libraries and information centres. Due to shrinking budget of libraries and continuous growth in open access journals and other information resources libraries are adopting and promoting open access. Many Libraries are moving from closed access to open access of resources. Every year nearly 10000 plus open access journals are coming in market so here librarians has to help their patrons to identify the correct journals for publish the research work and make funds available for APC charges for such journals. Librarians are supporting Open Access publishing and also playing an important role in promoting OA. But understanding importance of open access by user community is depend upon how actively that institute librarian promote OA. This paper deals about awareness of open Access among Indian Librarians Community  the main aim of this study to get idea about Librarians view about open Access and various open access resources.  Data is collected through online survey method from various Librarians group.