Open access: A global movement – Open Access Week

“The open access (OA) movement is gaining worldwide consensus as more and more countries are joining the effort to make research freely available.  China has recently joined the ranks of the nations that are making a shift to OA. On May 15, 2014, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), a major basic-science funding agency, and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), one of China’s most prestigious research institutions, announced that researchers associated with these institutions would need to give u…. Interestingly, more research-funding agencies in China are expected to follow a similar policy. While OA has been gradually gaining support in China in the past few years, this move might bring a major change to academia in China. The research output of China has multiplied over the years—the country’s contribution to the total global articles has increased from 5.6% in 2003 to 13.9% in 2012, according to the data calculated using the Science Citation Index (…—and thus, the most significant upshot of this move to OA is that a wealth of scientific knowledge would become available to the world. However, a downside is that while studies in the natural sciences will gain public access, the humanities will not benefit from this newly declared policy. Nevertheless, in the wake of the OA movement, China is making new forays, one of which is a growing interest in partnerships to start new OA journals as reported in BioMed Central.”

A landscape study on open access and monographs: Policies, funding and publishing in eight European countries

Knowledge Exchange is continuously active in promoting Open Access by bringing together Open Access experts from all six KE partner countries. This study was initiated by Knowledge Exchange and financed by Knowledge Exchange, FWF, CRIStin and Couperin, and together with the skilled expertise of Eelco Ferwerda, Frances Pinter and Niels Stern, we can now publish the biggest landscape study on the conditions and potentials for Open Access books yet. 

The report builds on i.a. 73 in-depth conversations, conducted across eight different countries (Denmark, Finland, Germany, Netherlands, United Kingdom, France, Norway and Austria) to understand current developments among three stakeholder groups: publishers, funders and libraries. The importance of author attitudes, scholarly reward and incentive systems is also raised throughout the study by numerous interviewees.

The report creates an overview of the OA monographs policies, funding streams and publishing models for all eight countries for the first time.

Open Letter: “Securing Europe’s Leadership In The Data Economy By Revising The Text And Data Mining (TDM) Exception” (European Alliance for Research Excellence)

Today, the European Alliance for Research Excellence (EARE) and 19 organisations representing European universities, libraries, research organisations and businesses sent an open letter to Members of the Legal Affairs Committee (JURI) in the European Parliament and Deputy Permanent Representatives of the 28 Member States, asking them to revise the Text and Data Mining (TDM) exception in the current copyright reform.

Open Access (the book) – Harvard Open Access Project

The home page for Peter Suber’s book, Open Access (MIT Press, 2012), with a growing collection of updates and supplements, and links to reviews, translations, and OA editions.

The new alchemy: Online networking, data sharing and research activity distribution tools for scientists – F1000Research

“There is an abundance of free online tools accessible to scientists and others that can be used for online networking, data sharing and measuring research impact. Despite this, few scientists know how these tools can be used or fail to take advantage of using them as an integrated pipeline to raise awareness of their research outputs. In this article, the authors describe their experiences with these tools and how they can make best use of them to make their scientific research generally more accessible, extending its reach beyond their own direct networks, and communicating their ideas to new audiences. These efforts have the potential to drive science by sparking new collaborations and interdisciplinary research projects that may lead to future publications, funding and commercial opportunities. The intent of this article is to: describe some of these freely accessible networking tools and affiliated products; demonstrate from our own experiences how they can be utilized effectively; and, inspire their adoption by new users for the benefit of science.”

Practicing What You Preach: Evaluating Access of Open Access Research

Abstract:  The open access movement seeks to encourage all researchers to make their works openly available and free of paywalls so more people can access their knowledge. Yet some researchers who study open access (OA) continue to publish their work in paywalled journals and fail to make it open. This project set out to study just how many published research articles about OA fall into this category, how many are being made open (whether by being published in a gold OA or hybrid journal or through open deposit), and how library and information science authors compare to other disciplines researching this field. Because of the growth of tools available to help researchers find open versions of articles, this study also sought to compare how these new tools compare to Google Scholar in their ability to disseminating OA research. From a sample collected from Web of Science of articles published since 2010, the study found that although a majority of research articles about OA are open in some form, a little more than a quarter are not. A smaller rate of library science researchers made their work open compared to non-library science researchers. In looking at the copyright of these articles published in hybrid and open journals, authors were more likely to retain copyright ownership if they printed in an open journal compared to authors in hybrid journals. Articles were more likely to be published with a Creative Commons license if published in an open journal compared to those published in hybrid journals.

Navigating the Political Waters of Open Access Publishing in Libraries

OA version of book chapter. 

 

Abstract:

“In recent years, many libraries have forayed into the world of open access (OA) publishing. While it marks a major shift in the mission of libraries to move from providing access to content to generating and creating content ourselves, it still involves the same basic values regarding access to information. The environment has changed, and libraries are adapting with new approaches and new staff skills to promote these fundamental values. The authors selected nineteen libraries and conducted phone interviews with a specific list of questions, encouraging discussion about how each library approached being a publisher. This chapter examines the politics and issues involved, and makes recommendations for defining our roles in this new territory. The authors highlight the approaches various libraries have taken—and the challenges faced—in selecting a platform, writing a business plan, planning for preservation, educating researchers about OA publishing, working with a university press, marketing, and navigating staff training issues. The chapter concludes with recommendations for areas of focus and future research.”

 

Citation:

Borchert, Carol Ann, Charlene N Simser, and Wendy C Robertson. 2016. “Navigating the Political Waters of Open Access Publishing in Libraries.” In Open Access and the Future of Scholarly Communication: Policy and Infrastructure, ed. Smith, Kevin L, and Katherine A Dickson.137–60. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield

FASEB editorial policy, updated to allow submission of preprints

“FASEB [Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology] permits the submission of preprint manuscripts, which will undergo the same review process as “non-preprint” manuscripts. Preprint submissions must meet the following criteria and conditions:
  
  1. The preprint cannot be under consideration for publication elsewhere, at any time it is being considered for publication by FASEB.
  2. Once a manuscript has been formally submitted to FASEB, no additional versions of the manuscript may be posted to preprint servers (A) while it is under consideration or reconsideration, (B) while undergoing revision prior to, or during, re-review/resubmission, and (C) while being prepared for publication.
  3. Additional manuscript versions of articles published by FASEB may not be posted to preprint servers after publication unless these manuscripts have an open access copyright license. (FASEB does permit certain manuscript versions of accepted articles to be posted to repositories and archives. Please click here to read that policy.)
  4. The preprint must be assigned a preprint DOI, and the preprint server must make all versions of a preprint manuscript (and related materials, such as figures, tables, supplemental data, etc.) available, as well as make it clear which version is the latest version. Please click here for more information about preprint DOIs.
  5. The preprint server must automatically link to the article in the journal once the article has been published on the journal’s web site.
  6. Preprint submissions posted to preprint servers with an open access license are allowed, but authors will be required—without exception—to pay the journal’s open access fee as a condition of acceptance.
  7. The authors must: (A) disclose at first submission that a manuscript has been posted to a preprint server, (B) indicate which server is being used and the copyright license under which the manuscript has been posted, and (C) provide a link to the preprint version of the article.
  8. Once a manuscript has been formally submitted, the authors may not change the copyright terms of the preprint. …”

FASEB editorial policy, updated to allow submission of preprints

“FASEB [Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology] permits the submission of preprint manuscripts, which will undergo the same review process as “non-preprint” manuscripts. Preprint submissions must meet the following criteria and conditions:
  
  1. The preprint cannot be under consideration for publication elsewhere, at any time it is being considered for publication by FASEB.
  2. Once a manuscript has been formally submitted to FASEB, no additional versions of the manuscript may be posted to preprint servers (A) while it is under consideration or reconsideration, (B) while undergoing revision prior to, or during, re-review/resubmission, and (C) while being prepared for publication.
  3. Additional manuscript versions of articles published by FASEB may not be posted to preprint servers after publication unless these manuscripts have an open access copyright license. (FASEB does permit certain manuscript versions of accepted articles to be posted to repositories and archives. Please click here to read that policy.)
  4. The preprint must be assigned a preprint DOI, and the preprint server must make all versions of a preprint manuscript (and related materials, such as figures, tables, supplemental data, etc.) available, as well as make it clear which version is the latest version. Please click here for more information about preprint DOIs.
  5. The preprint server must automatically link to the article in the journal once the article has been published on the journal’s web site.
  6. Preprint submissions posted to preprint servers with an open access license are allowed, but authors will be required—without exception—to pay the journal’s open access fee as a condition of acceptance.
  7. The authors must: (A) disclose at first submission that a manuscript has been posted to a preprint server, (B) indicate which server is being used and the copyright license under which the manuscript has been posted, and (C) provide a link to the preprint version of the article.
  8. Once a manuscript has been formally submitted, the authors may not change the copyright terms of the preprint. …”

Action Plan towards Open Access to Publications

“Assuming that providing research results in open access is beneficial to many stakeholders and will lead to better research, this document suggests a number of activities by which participants in the Global Research Council (GRC) can foster the open exchange of research results. After briefly introducing the concept and the benefits of open access, some common principles for transitioning to open access are suggested as a basis for the action plan. The proposed activities aim at raising awareness for open access, at promoting and supporting open access, and at assessing the implementation of the actions suggested. The action plan is designed to take into account that participants in the GRC come from various backgrounds, have various degrees of expertise in dealing with open access, and have different remits. Thus, funding agencies need to consider which of the proposed activities are appropriate to be taken up by (possibly consortia of) participants in the GRC….”