Students as Active Contributors in the Creation of Open Educational Resources

“Open Educational Resources (OER) provide promising opportunities to share and create learning materials without violating copyright law. Until now, the use and creation of OER were mainly discussed with regard to faculty and instructors. Less attention has been paid to students, so this paper is focused on their perspective on OER and argues that students can and should play an important part in the context of OER. A brief introduction to the concept of OER and their advantages is followed by an overview of the principles of Service-Dominant Logic (SDL), a theoretical framework that we consider to be a useful instrument for a better understanding of the student’s role in the use and production of OER. Focusing on the creation of value in service exchanges, this theoretical approach supports the notion that students who are using OER do in fact play an active role in the value creation of OER. We also present results from a recent empirical survey conducted in Austria, which was also focused on the students’ perspective on OER. Based on the available evidence, we conclude that an OER-friendly environment for students enhances the use and production of OER at Higher Education Institutions (HEI), which benefits all involved parties in the long term. Consequently, we propose a set of recommendations that should effect positive changes, and suggest some practical means of implementing them. “

Clowns to the Left of Me… Jokers to the Right: The Independent Publisher in an Age of Mergers and Acquisitions – The Scholarly Kitchen

“As many smart people have predicted, consolidation within scholarly publishing will continue to make big news well into 2019. Clarivate acquires Kopernio. Elsevier acquires bepress, Plum Analytics, and SSRN. Wiley acquires Atypon, etc., etc. We have also discussed with great interest the desire of the big publishers to offer start-to-finish workflow solutions. Roger Schonfeld warned of “lock in” while others argued business diversification.”

The article itself says little about open access, open source software, or open infrastructure. But the comment section is almost entirely devoted to these topics. 

Open Access at Indiana University Bloomington | Shreds and Patches

In April 2014, the Indiana University, Bloomington, Faculty Council Library recommended against moving forward with an OA policy. 

“[However], the Library Committee of the Indianapolis Faculty Council at IUPUI has recommended such a policy to its full campus council and the leadership groups on both campus intend to pursue educational and policy setting efforts around open access at the level of the university as a whole under the auspices of the University Faculty Council. Those watching open access policy work in Bloomington then should know that discussions on the issues are not concluded, despite the majority report of the Library Committee….

[At Bloomington] factors motivating member reservations about a campus open access policy defy categorization and are sometimes contradictory. A highly abstract summation of them is concern that such a policy could have various unintended negative consequences either as an outgrowth of achieving the stated goals of such a policy or in failing to do so.”

Impact of Social Sciences – A variety of strategies and funding approaches are required to accelerate the transition to open access. But in all, authors are key

“More than two decades of work towards liberating scholarly publishing from paywalled constraints has left many within the scholarly community exploring ways to accelerate the transition to open access. Not all institutions or author communities will agree upon which strategies or funding approaches to undertake, and nor do they need to. But whichever strategy is pursued, having university faculty lead the charge represents the most effective way forward. Rachael G. Samberg, Richard A. Schneider, Ivy Anderson and Jeff MacKie-Mason share the University of California’s range of open access policy and advocacy materials, and highlight some potential next steps that may be of use to faculty and author communities.”

University of Iowa: Sunsetting of the Open Access Fund

“For several years, UI Libraries has maintained an Open Access (OA) Fund to help researchers pay for the article processing charges (APCs) on open access publications. This fund supports authors choosing to make their publications open for anyone to read, broadening their audience and providing wide access to important research. We have decided to sunset the OA Fund for APCs within two years due to budget constraints. We found that the fund did nothing to offset our rapidly increasing journal subscription costs. In fact, the fund largely supports the same publishers to which we pay our pricey subscriptions. Given this reality, the final year that funding will be available is 2020, and the amount of funding for 2019 has been reduced from $3,000 per article to $2,000 per article. Additionally, each author will only be eligible to receive funding from the OA fund one time per fiscal year in 2019….”

Increasing Participation in Your Institutional Repository

“So you’ve established an institutional repository (IR), where users can put papers, theses, and experimental data on file, making it easily accessible to the larger world. While getting an institutional repository up and running is no small feat, it’s only the first step. To make the most of this tool, you have to fill it, and that means getting ongoing participation from faculty and students.

While making information as broadly accessible as possible is a high priority for most librarians, the same can’t necessarily be said for all the faculty members producing that information. To drive participation by potential contributors, librarians have to show students and faculty what’s in it for them in addition to making a principled appeal. One way of doing that is helping to tie participation to things that already matter to academics, like tracking (and increasing) citations and other proof of usage of their work….”

YERUN Statement on Open Science | investigación + biblioteca [I+B]

Google English: “The network of young European research universities YERUN (Young European Research Universities Network) has just published YERUN Statement on Open Science

The YERUN network is constituted by the following universities: Bremen, Konstanz and Ulm (Germany); Antwerpen (Belgium); Southern Denmark (Denmark); Autonomous University of Barcelona, Autonomous University of Madrid, Carlos III of Madrid and Pompeu Fabra (Spain); Eastern Finland (Finland); Paris Dauphine (France); Dublin City University (Ireland); University of Rome Tor Vergata (Italy); Maastricht (The Netherlands); New Lisbon (Portugal); Brunel and Essex (United Kingdom); Linköping (Sweden)….”

YERUN Statement on Open Science | Young European Research Universities Network

“The Young European Research Universities Network (YERUN) is committed to actively support the transition towards Open Science. The YERUN members agree that this transition requires not only investments in infrastructures and skills-building, but also a cultural shift in the way research is performed and rewarded. As an active member of the EU Open Science Policy platform, YERUN develops alternatives and provides recommendations to making Open Science a reality. However, active leadership and determination are needed to overcome existing challenges and promote a coherent implementation of this transition. In the coming years, the YERUN members will share experiences and resources, pilot (joint) actions and encourage best-practice exchange across the network and beyond. In doing so, YERUN aims to be a pioneer in the transition process.”

Open Science Support as a Portfolio of Services and Projects: From Awareness to Engagement

Abstract:  Together with many other universities worldwide, the University of Göttingen has aimed to unlock the full potential of networked digital scientific communication by strengthening open access as early as the late 1990s. Open science policies at the institutional level consequently followed and have been with us for over a decade. However, for several reasons, their adoption often is still far from complete when it comes to the practices of researchers or research groups. To improve this situation at our university, there is dedicated support at the infrastructural level: the university library collaborates with several campus units in developing and running services, activities and projects in support of open access and open science. This article outlines our main activity areas and aligns them with the overall rationale to reach higher uptake and acceptance of open science practice at the university. The mentioned examples of our activities highlight how we seek to advance open science along the needs and perspectives of diverse audiences and by running it as a multi-stakeholder endeavor. Therefore, our activities involve library colleagues with diverse backgrounds, faculty and early career researchers, research managers, as well as project and infrastructure staff. We conclude with a summary of achievements and challenges to be faced.

News – Liverpool University Press journal, Francosphères, to flip to full open-access with funding from the Open Library of Humanities

“We are extremely pleased to announce that our international library partners have voted to accept Francosphères’ application to join the Open Library of Humanities. This is part of our partnership with Liverpool University Press, and is the second journal – following Quaker Studies last year– that has moved from a subscription model to our full open-access model. Francosphères is a highly respected journal devoted to transcultural and intercultural French Studies edited by an international team based in Paris, Oxford and London. Established in 2012 to support recent advances in postcolonial and gender theory, the journal has been publishing articles in English and French that seek to explore and interrogate the presence of French language and culture across frontiers and borders and how this is legitimated in ‘Francophone’ culture.”