Welcome to the COrDa wiki!

“The Community ORCID Dashboard (CoRDa) is a project to answer the question “Who in my institution does and does not have an ORCID iD”?

Bringing together a wide range of open and institutional data sources, it will composite them through an abstract layer into an accessible reporting and visualisation portal – the dashboard….”

A first-of-its-kind partnership to drive the future of open science in the Netherlands

“A partnership that aims to deliver a new way of working for science has been forged between the Association of Universities in the Netherlands (VSNU), the Netherlands Federation of University Medical Centres (NFU), the Dutch Research Council (NWO) and Elsevier. The partnership includes publishing and reading services for Dutch research institutions. As a result, 95 percent of Dutch articles can be made immediately open access. The agreement also covers access to all Elsevier content.

What’s significant about this agreement is that the parties involved worked in partnership to carefully develop a collaboration that will shape new open science services in the Netherlands. The country has a notable heritage in higher education spanning hundreds of years. The QS World University Rankings 2019 includes 13 universities in the Netherlands, all within the world’s top 350 and seven in the top 150 — a testament to the strong international reputation of Dutch institutions. To help the country remain at the forefront of research in the decades to come, this partnership includes the development of open science services related to research intelligence and scholarly communication, making it the first such agreement of its kind. Open Science aims to make science more open, reproducible, inclusive and collaborative….”

Open research statement – Staff home, The University of York

“What is open research?

The core idea behind open research is that all aspects of the research cycle should be shared and accessible where possible. Research should be as open as possible, as closed as necessary. Open research practice enables a wide range of audiences to freely discover and engage with our excellent research. It makes the research process transparent and creates new opportunities for outputs and methods to be reused, reproduced and credited. It generates an environment for more effective and efficient research, and a culture where open is the default.

Open research embeds values of inclusivity, diversity, integrity and accessibility in the research process. It is based in the belief that knowledge produces the greatest benefit when it exists in a commons, and that research produced through public funding should belong to and exist for the benefit of all.

The terms ‘open research’ and ‘open science’ are sometimes used interchangeably but are based on the same principles of collaboration and accountability which can be applied widely. Open research is relevant to all researchers, but its applications differ between disciplines.

Our commitment to open research

The University of York is committed to the long-term development of an open research culture in support of our research foundations. As part of this commitment, we have created strong governance structures for advancement of open research. We aim to actively create and pursue opportunities to grow and foster a values-driven, pluralistic, multi-faceted approach towards open research, embracing disciplinary differences and supporting our staff and students in the process.

We believe that all stages of the research lifecycle can potentially be made open, within the bounds of the terms and conditions associated with your research; this ranges from opening up research methodologies through to pre-registration, sharing notebooks, software and data, and publishing open access. Open practice encourages sharing of outcomes with the principle of being as open as possible, as early as possible. Open practice also extends into the teaching domain, for example in the production and dissemination of Open Educational Resources (OERs).

It is widely accepted that open practices allow for greater visibility and wider distribution of research. Open practices unlock access to knowledge and generate new opportunities for collaboration and participation.”

To rediscover their public value universities can learn from the free culture movement | Impact of Social Sciences

“The culture of acceleration and quantification that arguably defines contemporary academic research is closely related to the information society in which we live and the technologies that support it. In this post Dafne Calvo, argues that the democratic decentralised principles of the free culture movement provide a blueprint for how academics and academic institutions might create an alternative to the accelerated academy….”\

Research results should be open access. If free software is defined by the freedom to access, contribute, modify, and distribute computer programs, free culture extends these principles to all types of cultural production, including academic research. According to a 2013 study, the multinational publishing houses Elsevier, Wiley, Springer, Taylor & Francis, and Sage accumulated 47% of global scientific production. Generally, their journals impose fees, either in the form of subscriptions, or for the right to publish in open access journals. As an example, Sage’s open-access option costs $3,000. Accessing and contributing to scholarly research, is constrained by these paywalls, as not all people and not even all scholars, have access to the funding required to access and publish in these journals. However, such journals remain the top ranked journals and for academics to progress their careers, they are obliged to publish in them. Free culture, points to how research can only have a meaningful impact, if it is distributed openly. Current research assessment practices, place the greatest value on the internal academic assessment of research through peer review and citation. They are less able to measure the social value of research beyond the academy. As such, the academic community must actively search for formulas to evaluate the quality of research without preventing its universal access….”

To rediscover their public value universities can learn from the free culture movement | Impact of Social Sciences

“The culture of acceleration and quantification that arguably defines contemporary academic research is closely related to the information society in which we live and the technologies that support it. In this post Dafne Calvo, argues that the democratic decentralised principles of the free culture movement provide a blueprint for how academics and academic institutions might create an alternative to the accelerated academy….”\

Research results should be open access. If free software is defined by the freedom to access, contribute, modify, and distribute computer programs, free culture extends these principles to all types of cultural production, including academic research. According to a 2013 study, the multinational publishing houses Elsevier, Wiley, Springer, Taylor & Francis, and Sage accumulated 47% of global scientific production. Generally, their journals impose fees, either in the form of subscriptions, or for the right to publish in open access journals. As an example, Sage’s open-access option costs $3,000. Accessing and contributing to scholarly research, is constrained by these paywalls, as not all people and not even all scholars, have access to the funding required to access and publish in these journals. However, such journals remain the top ranked journals and for academics to progress their careers, they are obliged to publish in them. Free culture, points to how research can only have a meaningful impact, if it is distributed openly. Current research assessment practices, place the greatest value on the internal academic assessment of research through peer review and citation. They are less able to measure the social value of research beyond the academy. As such, the academic community must actively search for formulas to evaluate the quality of research without preventing its universal access….”

German universities report record number of clinical trial results

“German universities have uploaded the results of 76 clinical trials over the past six months. Universities have uploaded twice as many results over the past six months than during the preceding six years combined….”

Scandinavian universities perform dismally at reporting clinical trial results

“Universities across Finland, Norway and Sweden have failed to upload the results of hundreds of clinical trials onto the EU Clinical Trial Register, in violation of EU transparency rules….”

Dutch research institutions and Elsevier initiate world’s first national Open Science partnership

“The Association of Universities in the Netherlands (VSNU), The Netherlands Federation of University Medical Centres (NFU), The Dutch Research Council (NWO) and Elsevier, a global leader in research publishing and information analytics, have formed a novel partnership that includes publishing and reading services as well as the joint development of new open science services for  disseminating and evaluating knowledge. The partnership runs until 31 December 2024….”

CARL Institutional Open Access Policy Template and Toolkit – Canadian Association of Research Libraries

“CARL has created this Institutional Open Access Policy Template and Toolkit to help prepare those wishing to engage in this activity on their campus.

The tools included in this toolkit are designed to support first efforts to create an institution-wide policy, but can also be helpful in developing faculty- or department-specific policies, or in expanding an institution’s existing policies….”

CARL Announces Release of its Institutional Open Access Policy Template and Accompanying Toolkit

“The Canadian Association of Research Libraries is pleased to announce the release of its Institutional Open Access Policy Template for Canadian institutions, which is accompanied by a toolkit to help prepare those wishing to develop such a policy on their campus….”