OER Saves Students $1 Million in Textbook Costs   | Today at Santa Fe | Santa Fe College | Gainesville, FL

“Over the last few years, several Santa Fe College professors opted to forego the use of traditional textbooks and use Open Educational Resources (OER) to save students money.  OER content is licensed in a manner that provides perpetual permission resulting in the ability to retain, reuse, revise, and redistribute content.”

temoa : Open Educational Resources (OER) Portal

“TEMOA is a knowledge hub that eases a public and multilingual catalog of Open Educational Resources (OER) which aims to support the education community to find those resources and materials that meet their needs for teaching and learning through a specialized and collaborative search system and social tools.

It contains selected educational resources, described and evaluated by an academic community.

Resources categorized by area of knowledge, educational level and language, among others.

Provides a friendly search engine through intuitive filters.

Allows the creation of communities around educational resources….”

Sophia Project – Online resources in philosophy and ethics

“Founded in 1999 by college educators, the Sophia Project is an online collection of original articles, primary source texts, and commentaries in the fields of philosophy and ethics designed to provide the newcomer to the discipline of philosophy with the resources necessary to read great philosophical works.  We believe that with the proper guidance almost any intelligent person can begin a life-long reading program in philosophy…and perhaps even become a bit wiser in the process….”

Survey of the Academic Library Role in the Use of Open Access Textbooks and Other Open Access Educational Materials

“This seminal study presents data from 50 colleges and universities about their academic library policies in providing open access textbooks and other open access educational materials and in cultivating their use.  The study gives detailed data and commentary on current and planned efforts in areas such as textbooks, journals, periodicals other than journals, MOOCs, course packs, interactive tutorials and other areas of intellectual property.  The study also gives highly precise information on the compilation and presentation of links to educational resources on YouTube and Google Scholar, among other sources, and overall college and university and specific academic library efforts to develop open access educational materials.  It looks at efforts to provide support services and stipends to faculty, and to publicize the availability of open access educational materials to faculty.

 The survey respondents also report on the exact number of courses currently using open access textbooks and their plans and expectations for the future. In addition, the participants name colleges and universities that they view as open access role models, and give advice to their peers on how to approach the provision of open access educational materials, from textbooks to journals and other forms of intellectual property.

In addition, the study presents data on the role of academic libraries in providing commercial textbooks and the impact of open access on these efforts.  Data in the report is broken out by size, type and tuition level of the college or university and by other useful criteria….”

No, Institutional Licensing is Not the Solution to Textbook Prices | The Digital Reader

“Textbook prices have been rising faster than healthcare for decades. this has inspired the growth in use of open educational resources and even degree programs that don’t require paid textbooks.

Arthur Attwell, on the other hand, has a different solution. He wants schools to license textbooks just like they currently license access to academic journals.”

Open Textbooks | Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources

“Find open and free textbooks that may be suitable for use in community college courses from the list of Subjects provided. For descriptions of these open textbooks, see listings in MERLOT and OER Commons. Most of the textbooks on this list have Creative Commons (CC) open licenses or GNU-Free Document License. Others are U.S. government documents in the public domain (PD)….”

Open Textbook Initiative | American Inst. of Mathematics

“The American Institute of Mathematics (AIM) seeks to encourage the adoption of open source and open access mathematics textbooks. The AIM Editorial Board has developed evaluation criteria to identify the books that are suitable for use in traditional university courses. The Editorial Board maintains a list of Approved Textbooks which have been judged to meet these criteria….”

panOpen

“panOpen is a platform that enables mainstream institutional adoption of Open Educational Resources as an alternative to commercial textbooks.

We provide faculty with turnkey peer-reviewed content, tools for customization, assessment, and analytics, and a means of financially sustaining campus-based OER efforts, allowing faculty to lower costs and improve learning outcomes.

panOpen was founded in April 2013 by Brian Jacobs to deliver on the promise of Open Educational Resources (OER) in higher education. Not only do OER improve educational access, but they also free faculty from the constraints of the commercial copyright structure. panOpen provides the tools and services necessary to realize this promise. It also incentivizes faculty to update and contribute open content, ensuring sustainability and growth….”

International Survey of Research University Leadership: Views on Supporting Open Access Scholarly & Educational Materials

“This report looks closely at the attitudes on open access of a sample of 314 deans, chancellors, department chairmen, research institute directors, provosts, trustees, vice presidents and other upper level administrators from more than 50 research universities in the USA, Canada, the UK, Ireland and Australia.  The report gives detailed information on what they think of the cost of academic journal subscriptions, and how they understand the meaning of the term “open access.”  The study also gives highly detailed data on what kind of policies the research university elite support or might support in the area of open access, including policies such as restricting purchases of very high-priced journals, paying publication fees for open access publications, mandating deposit of university scholarship into digital repositories, and developing open access educational materials from university resources. 

Just a few of the report’s many findings are that:

  • The lowest percentage considering the high cost of journals a big problem was in the United States, where only 11.56% of higher education leadership had this opinion; the highest share, in Canada, 27.45% had this view.
  • More than 40% of administrators from public universities in the sample supported the idea of using university funds to develop open access textbooks from materials developed or owned by the university or its scholars.
  • Support for mandatory deposit requirements for scholarly output into university digital repositories was highest among the universities ranked in the top 41 worldwide.

Data in the report is broken out by country, university ranking, work title, field of work responsibility, level of compensations, age, gender and other variables.”

From Open to Action: Open Textbook Summit 2017 | BCcampus

“Thought-leaders, open education practitioners, pioneers and newbies alike came together for two days, from May 24-25, at Simon Fraser University, in beautiful, Vancouver, B.C. We shared experiences and exchanged ideas, explored what other institutions are doing to move the open textbook agenda forward, and looked ahead at how open pedagogy can influence open textbook development to enhance teaching and learning….”