2021 Pressbooks H5P OER Development Grant – BCcampus

“This call for proposals is for post-secondary instructors and faculty in British Columbia to develop sets of content types in H5P that support open textbooks in the B.C. Open Textbook Collection (see below for a list of suggested books). The intent of these grants is to develop activities in which students can practice applying new concepts and skills that align with content within the selected open textbook.

Eligible grantees include individual instructors, groups of faculty or instructors, departments, institutions, or external working groups made up of instructors and faculty connected to B.C. post-secondary institutions (i.e., articulation groups or other working groups). Collaboration between individuals and departments at different institutions is not only allowed, but encouraged.

The maximum value of each grant is $10,000….”

Ebook Collection Development in Academic Libraries: Examining Preference, Management, and Purchasing Patterns

“Key findings: • Electronic books are now an established part of academic library collections, and many libraries report planned future expenditures in this format. On average, ebooks constitute approximately one-third of a library’s monograph collection. • Patron convenience and need are the main motivators for libraries’ investment in ebooks. The top four advantages of ebooks identified by institutions are all user-related: anywhere access, anytime access, enhancement of distance/online education, and allowance for multi-user access. As this survey was conducted during the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, many respondents emphasized the benefits of access. Typical responses included “perfect for COVID-19,” “these are the only books our students can access right now because of COVID-19,” and “serving college programs and courses now being taught remotely due to pandemic.” • Librarians believe that patrons are increasingly format agnostic when it comes to monographs, and as a result they are purchasing a mix of print and electronic books dictated by availability, cost, and collecting scope rather than assumptions about patron preferences. • The ebook acquisition landscape is complex with multiple vendors, platforms, and purchase models to navigate. Despite this complexity and the inherent frustrations that it brings, libraries are effectively handling the challenges and do not see them as insurmountable barriers to acquiring ebook content. • The ebook format has not transformed the collecting scopes and strategies of academic libraries. Libraries are purchasing the same types of content in ebook format as they purchase in print, focusing on the relevance of the content and not the format….

Saving money is an oft-cited benefit of ebooks for patrons as well. The push for libraries to invest in etextbooks and open educational resources are movements to help offset the growing expense of higher education for students. When libraries invest in these options, they save students thousands of dollars. Ebooks also avoid punitive late fees and fines for books, since they are never overdue or damaged; ebooks are either downloaded and stored on a patron’s computer or access to the content expires….

Nearly all academic libraries and their home institutions instituted stay-at-home orders to prevent the spread of COVID-19. With campuses closed, access to physical books through a library’s holdings or interlibrary loan was limited to non-existent. Libraries and their patrons looked to digital research objects such as ebooks to support research and instructional needs from a distance. In addition to using a library’s existing ebook collections, patrons also utilized open access ebooks, ebooks from the Internet Archive, and ebooks from the Hathi Trust Emergency Temporary Access Service (for participating libraries). …”

Full article: Supporting Students: OER and Textbook Affordability Initiatives at a Mid-Sized University

Abstract:  In 2018, the Alabama Commission on Higher Education (ACHE) kicked off a statewide program to increase awareness and adoption of Open Educational Resources (OER) at colleges and universities. Spurred by the efforts of ACHE, the University of North Alabama committed to OER and textbook affordability programs and included OER adoption as a key aspiration in their 2019–2024 strategic plan, Roaring with Excellence. With support from the president and provost of the university, Collier Library adopted strategic purchasing initiatives, including database purchases to support specific courses as well as purchasing reserve copies of textbooks for high-enrollment, required classes. In addition, the scholarly communications librarian became a founding member of the OER working group on campus. This group’s mission is to direct efforts for increasing faculty awareness and adoption of OER. This presentation will discuss the structure of each of these programs from initial idea to implementation. Included will be discussions of assessment of faculty and student awareness, development of an OER stipend program, starting a textbook purchasing program, promotion of efforts, funding, and future goals.

 

Farewell Print Textbook Reserves: A COVID-19 Change to Embrace | EDUCAUSE

“The current turn of events points to the future demise of print textbook reserves. It should spur librarians and their faculty colleagues to imagine higher education with fully digital e-reserves and a commitment to born-digital, zero- or low-cost learning materials that all students can equitably afford to access. We should adopt Open Educational Resources (OER) to the fullest extent possible. Together, let us learn from this COVID-19 experience and move forward by eliminating our fragile dependence on course content that commercial publishers refuse to make available to libraries in digital format. Any sustainable future for affordable and accessible digital learning materials must come from within the academy.”

Farewell Print Textbook Reserves: A COVID-19 Change to Embrace | EDUCAUSE

“The current turn of events points to the future demise of print textbook reserves. It should spur librarians and their faculty colleagues to imagine higher education with fully digital e-reserves and a commitment to born-digital, zero- or low-cost learning materials that all students can equitably afford to access. We should adopt Open Educational Resources (OER) to the fullest extent possible. Together, let us learn from this COVID-19 experience and move forward by eliminating our fragile dependence on course content that commercial publishers refuse to make available to libraries in digital format. Any sustainable future for affordable and accessible digital learning materials must come from within the academy.”

LibreTexts – Free The Textbook

“The LibreTexts mission is to unite students, faculty and scholars in a cooperative effort to develop an easy-to-use online platform for the construction, customization, and dissemination of open educational resources (OER) to reduce the burdens of unreasonable textbook costs to our students and society….”

EKU BookSmart Program | The EKU Advantage | Eastern Kentucky University

“In an effort to eliminate obstacles on the path to a college degree, we’ve partnered with Barnes & Noble College to provide free textbooks for all EKU undergraduate students for the 2021-2022 academic year. The EKU BookSmart program provides students with all required textbooks and course materials for the semester, delivered directly to them, before classes start, at no additional cost. This is an investment in students and is meant to ensure that all undergraduate students have every opportunity to succeed and earn a college degree.  The EKU BookSmart program was created as a way to provide students with an additional level of financial support in their educational experience by lowering the cost of attendance for the 2021-2022 academic year.”

Raising awareness about access to affordable textbooks | Around the O

“I also raise awareness about textbook affordability and the need for open educational resources, or OERs. OERs are free and openly licensed course materials or textbooks that can help ensure that all students have access to course materials on the first day of class regardless of their financial situation. I teach workshops and collaborate with individual faculty members, librarians and instructional designers. Beyond that, I am also a liaison between the library department and our statewide OER coordinator to help connect faculty with resources as they transition to lower-cost options for their courses.

When I first joined the UO community, awareness about textbook affordability was fairly low. Interest about this issue is definitely gaining traction now though because students are really invested in it. As librarians, we can’t change tuition costs or student fees, but we can affect the textbook prices by choosing open textbooks or other lower-cost options through the library….”