Large-scale ICU data sharing for global collaboration: the first 1633 critically ill COVID-19 patients in the Dutch Data Warehouse | SpringerLink

“Given these considerations, a large-scale ICU data sharing collaboration in The Netherlands was initiated for the COVID-19 pandemic, resulting in the Dutch Data Warehouse (DDW, Fig. 1). While the database is growing, at this point, the DDW combines pseudonymized EHR data from 23 intensive care units covering the entire ICU admission of all adult COVID-19 patients treated in these ICUs. Collected data include data from monitoring and life support devices, demographics, medication, fluid balance, comorbidities, laboratory results, and outcomes. All parameters were manually reviewed by intensive care professionals and mapped to a common ontology. A software data pipeline converted units, filtered data entry errors, and calculated derived clinical parameters. Data validation was a continuous process including hospital data verification and visual inspection of distribution plots….”

Plan S and funding

This presentation was given by Johan Rooryck during the Open Access Talk on 29 October 2020. Johan Rooryck, Professor at Leiden University and Executive Director of cOAlition S, briefly outlines the rationale for the principles of Plan S. Beyond that, he discusses its implementation for all grants awarded by cOAlition S funders from 1 January 2021, including the Horizon Europe framework. In his talk, Johan Rooryck covers the following questions: Which conditions do you need to fulfil to publish in a journal of your choice under Plan S? What can the newly developed Journal Checker Tool do for you? How does the recent Rights Retention Strategy help you to keep the rights to your Author Accepted Manuscript? In addition, Johan Rooryck mentions a number of other projects initiated by cOAlition S, such as the Price Transparency Framework to ensure that prices for publishing services become more transparent and fair or the commission of a study to identify concrete funding mechanisms to support and strengthen diamond journals and their platforms. The lecture “Plan S and funding – What is going to change?” was held as part of the Open Access Talk online series of the BMBF-funded project open-access.network.

Poland’s ‘legislation’ of Holocaust history vs. Netherlands’ open-access archive | The Times of Israel

“When historians seek to research what Dutch citizens did during Nazi Germany’s occupation of the Netherlands, they have access to a stack of files that’s taller than the National Mall in Washington, DC.

Twenty years ago, those files of the “Central Archive of Special Jurisdiction” were deposited at the Dutch National Archives in The Hague. Suddenly, 300,000 case files on Dutch citizens suspected of having collaborated with Nazis were made available to everyone….

The climate in the Netherlands differs sharply from an allegedly “research-muzzling” atmosphere in Poland. On February 9, a district court ordered prominent Holocaust historians Jan Grabowski and Barbara Engelking to apologize to a woman who claimed the scholars slandered her deceased uncle….

In Poland, research into the Holocaust has become a lightning rod since the Law and Justice party was elected in 2015. Simultaneously, the digitization of the Netherlands’ “special jurisdiction” archive has helped researchers piece together a diverse mosaic of Dutch citizens’ wartime behavior….

Poland has its own version of the “Central Archive of Special Jurisdiction.” In 1989, files from the communist-era security services became available to the public, including those related to Nazi collaborators….

According to Grabowski, Poland’s “History Laws” are intended to “defend the good name of the Polish nation.” Any claims that Poland bore responsibility for the Holocaust are now criminalized, despite the historian’s documentation that 200,000 Jews were murdered by their Polish neighbors….”

United Academics Foundation | Connecting Science & Society

“Join us to give global society free & reliable access to scientific articles they need to expand their knowledge horizon, develop their institutional capacities and grow their business….

The United Academics Foundation (UAF) is a not-for-profit organization. It was founded in January 2013 by Louis Lapidaire, Robert Paul Kuiper and Anouk Vleugels. The Foundation is based in Amsterdam, but our team is international, with a group of dedicated people working remotely on several continents….

The mission of the United Academics Foundation (UAF) is to connect science and society: creating a world where scientific research results are accessible for all, so that knowledge can be easily spread and built upon….”

 

Multidimensional framework for furthering open access | Zenodo

Abstract:  The spreadsheet provide a multidimensional framework for furthering open access to research output. Combining three dimensions (i.e. aspects of open access, actors involved and the levels at which actions can be taken) results in a multidimensional framework that can inform future developments. Vertically, the different aspects of open access are projected. Horizontally, the five “levels of engagement” are presented for each of the different actors relevant for open access in the Dutch context. The framework can be used in various ways. For instance one could fill it with current actions/policies. But one could also use it to prioritize or plan future actions. This file set contains both the template and the versions filled with current actions relevant for researchers in the Nederlands in PDF format, in spreadsheet format and as presentation slides.

 

What About Reuse? A Study on the Use of Open Educational Resources in Dutch Higher Education | Baas | Open Praxis

Abstract:  Extensive research has taken place over the years to examine the barriers of OER adoption, but little empirical studies has been undertaken to map the amount of OER reuse. The discussion around the actual use of OER, outside the context in which they were developed, remains ongoing. Previous studies have already shown that searching and evaluating resources are barriers for actual reuse. Hence, in this quantitative survey study we explored teachers’ practices with resources in Higher Education Institutes in the Netherlands. The survey had three runs, each in a different context, with a total of 439 respondents. The results show that resources that are hard or time-consuming to develop are most often reused from third parties without adaptations. Resources that need to be more context specific are often created by teachers themselves. To improve our understanding of reuse, follow-up studies must explore reuse with a more qualitative research design in order to explore how these hidden practices of dark reuse look like and how teachers and students benefit of it.

 

Beyond mandates: For open science to become a norm, it must be recognised and rewarded | Impact of Social Sciences

“Calls to align incentives in academia to promote open research practices are not new. However, in recent years research funders are increasingly implementing policies and schemes designed to promote open science practices amongst researchers. In this post, Maria Cruz and Hans de Jonge outline details of the Dutch Research Council’s (NWO) new Open Science Fund, which they suggest is the natural next step towards a culture of open science in Dutch research.”

Digitised Leiden Maps and Atlases collection available in Digital Collections – Leiden University

“Leiden University Libraries (UBL) has made more than 20.000 maps, atlases and topographical prints and drawings available in Digital Collections. With this, a significant part of one of the largest and most important collections of maps and atlases in the Netherlands has now been made digitally available for research, education and the general public. Due to copyright protections, recently published maps and atlases may not be available online; these items may be viewed digitally within library premises or can be physically consulted in the Special Collections Reading Room….”

New funding instrument to stimulate Open Science | NWO

“NWO is launching the ‘Open Science Fund’, a new funding instrument intended to give Open Science a boost. Projects can be financially supported through the programme in the broad field of Open Science. Examples include projects aimed at developing innovative ways of (open access) publishing, the FAIR sharing of data or software, and projects that help bring about the necessary culture change. The Open Science Fund is a new tool for recognising and rewarding researchers for open research practices….

NWO has been promoting the transition to Open Science for a long time now. All publications funded by NWO must therefore be available through open access. Research data generated during NWO projects must be made available as openly as possible too. The launch of the Open Science Fund is also in keeping with the national ‘Recognition and Rewards’ programme and the ‘Room for Everyone’s Talent’ position paper published a year ago by VSNU, ZonMw, KNAW and NWO.”