Fair Open Access Alliance

“The mission of the foundation is

a. to promote and support initiatives concerning (Fair) Open Access publications in the broadest sense;

b. to acquire resources and financially sustain (Fair) Open Access publications;

c. to support foundations financially and otherwise in various disciplines (xxxOA’s) that pursue the same goals;

d. to expand the Open Library of Humanities to other disciplines.

e. to propagate and promote the principles of Fair Open Access over all disciplines of science. “

How Elsevier plans to sabotage Open Access – Hacker Noon

“It was a long and difficult road to get the major publishing houses to open up to open access, but in the end the Dutch universities got their much awaited ‘gold deal’ for open access. A recently revealed contract between Elsevier and the Dutch research institutes lays bare the retardant tactics the publishing giant employs to stifle the growth of open access….”

Open Access Library | OALibrary

“The Open Access Library offers scientific publications for free. No log-in, no price tag. We give publicly funded research back to you. Connect science and society….

Fill out the form below, make your payment, then upload your work. We will ensure that you are in compliance with every open access requirement detailed by your funder. [1] Fill out the form below. [2] Pay the processing fee of €100. [3] Upload your work. [4] Receive your compliance note [to use with your funder] after verification….”

Association of Universities in the Netherlands launches 2018-2020 Road Map to Open Access

100% open-access publication by 2020: that ambition is stated by the National Plan Open Science and the goal to which the VSNU has committed its efforts. The VSNU E-zine on open access published today includes the plans made by the universities in order to achieve this goal. 

Evaluation of offset agreements – report 3: Springer Compact

This document is the third report of five on the evaluation of offset agreements in Sweden and will focus on the agreement with Springer called Springer Compact and its outcome during 2017. 

 

 The evaluation is conducted to examine the effects of Springer Compact regarding economy, administration, researcher attitudes and research dissemination, and make recommendations for future negotiations with Springer Nature and other publishers. The previous reports were written in Swedish, but the remaining reports will be written in English. Therefore, some of the sections from the previous reports are repeated here to provide a background for the international reader. In addition to this, there is also a section comparing the Swedish Springer Compact agreement to that of three other countries (Netherlands, United Kingdom and Austria) and one society (Max Planck Society).

The report is structured in the following way: below is a short summary. Then the first section presents an introduction, describing open access, offset agreements and the background to why such agreements have emerged, the aim of the evaluation and a brief overview of existing recommendations for negotiating open access with publishers. The next section explains the specific offset model of Springer Compact. The third section makes the comparison between different Springer Compact agreements. The fourth and fifth sections contain the evaluation and recommendations for future negotiations.

The Dutch Approach to Achieving Open Access

“In this paper, the authors – both of whom are library directors and involved in the contract negotiations with the bigger scientific publishers – present the conditions that formed the Dutch approach in these negotiations. A combination of clear political support, a powerful delegation, a unique bargaining model and fidelity to their principles geared the Dutch to their success in achieving open access. The authors put these joint license and open access negotiations in the perspective of open science and show that they are part of the transition towards open access.”

Does open prefer to cite open, and closed prefer to cite closed? – Google Sheets

Data showing that both OA and non-OA publications by faculty at Utrecht University cite non-OA sources more than OA sources. But the ratios are significantly different. The non-OA publications cite non-OA sources 67% of the time (open sources, 33%), while the OA publications cite non-OA sources 56% of the time (open sources, 44%). 

Public consultation meeting about open science program – Utrecht University

“The University has drafted an ambitious plan on open science for the coming years. This plan will affect researchers. They are therefore encouraged to help the drafting committee create the best possible plan for our university on the 14th of December.”