InnOAccess-Workshops: Publishing Free-of-Charge Open Access Journals Sustainably | ZBW MediaTalk

“As part of the project “Innovative Open Access in small sciences” (InnOAccess), funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG), two digital transfer workshops took place on 29 and 30 September as well as on 6 and 7 October 2020. The first workshop was dedicated to special technical questions and cooperative support in publishing Open Access journals, and was carried out by the Alexander von Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society (HIIG). In the second workshop, hosted by the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, the central point of focus was the sustainable financing and community integration of Open Access journals. Project and workshops were aimed at supporting and safeguarding publisher-independent (scholar-led), free-of-charge Open Access journals….”

How is open access accused of being predatory? The impact of Beall’s lists of predatory journals on academic publishing – ScienceDirect

Abstract:  The aim of this paper is to investigate how predatory journals are characterized by authors who write about such journals. We emphasize the ways in which predatory journals have been conflated with—or distinguished from—open access journals. We created a list of relevant publications on predatory publishing using four databases: Web of Science, Scopus, Dimensions, and Microsoft Academic. We included 280 English-language publications in the review according to their contributions to the discussions on predatory publishing. Then, we coded and qualitatively analyzed these publications. The findings show the profound influence of Jeffrey Beall, who composed and maintained himself lists of predatory publishers and journals, on the whole discussion on predatory publishing. The major themes by which Beall has characterized predatory journals are widely present in non-Beall publications. Moreover, 122 papers we reviewed combined predatory publishing with open access using similar strategies as Beall. The overgeneralization of the flaws of some open access journals to the entire open access movement has led to unjustified prejudices among the academic community toward open access. This is the first large-scale study that systematically examines how predatory publishing is defined in the literature.

 

Announcement of conversion of Journal of Synchrotron Radiation to 100% open access from January 2022

“The International Union of Crystallography (IUCr) has concluded that the time for converting Journal of Synchrotron Radiation (JSR) to become fully open access has arrived. With this issue we are pleased to announce that JSR will become a fully open-access journal from the beginning of 2022. More specifically, and with the approval of the IUCr Executive Committee, the decision has been made to convert JSR to fully open access from the January 2022 issue….”

NASIG – Open Access Content Under Threat: Internet Archive and Portico

“With disruptions in print supply chains and cutbacks on server and staff support, the threat of unpreserved content disappearing is greater than ever. Join us for an informational overview and deep dive into how technology is being used to preserve websites and their underlying content. Stephanie Orphan, Director of Content Preservation for Portico will discuss the preservation service’s efforts to preserve OA content and successes in providing access to it when it disappears. Jefferson Bailey, Director, Web Archiving and Data Services at Internet Archive will provide an update on Internet Archive Scholar and its efforts to ensure at risk content remains available.

In 2018, the Internet Archive undertook a large-scale project to build as complete a collection as possible of scholarly outputs published on the web, as well as improve the discoverability and accessibility of scholarly works archived as part of these global web harvests. This project involved a number of areas of work: targeted archiving of known OA publications (especially at-risk “long tail” publications), extraction and augmentation of bibliographic metadata and full text, integration and preservation of related identifier, registry, and aggregation services and datastores, partnerships with affiliated initiatives and joint service developments, and creation of new tools and machine learning approaches for identifying archived scholarly work in existing global scale born-digital and web collections. The project also identifies and archives associated research outputs such as blogs, datasets, code repos, and other secondary research objects. The alpha public interface, not yet officially announced, can be found at https://scholar-qa.archive.org/ and the testing and catalog temporarily hosted at https://fatcat.wiki/. Portico has long been preserving OA content and is currently preserving more than 5,000 OA journals from 309 publishers. They currently provide access to 114 of these OA journals, which were otherwise no longer available online for use by researchers (these are referred to as triggered titles). Portico is actively exploring methods of preserving more of the most vulnerable scholarly content and seeking input from the community on this topic. Whether you are a digital preservation expert or new to the scene, this session will offer something for you.”

CLOCKSS is Collaborating to Improve the Preservation of Open Access Journals – CLOCKSS

“DOAJ, CLOCKSS Archive, Internet Archive, Keepers Registry/ISSN International Centre and Public Knowledge Project (PKP) have agreed to partner to provide an alternative pathway for the preservation of small-scale, APC-free, Open Access journals.

The recent study authored by M.Laakso, L.Matthias, and N.Jahn has revived academia’s concern over the disappearance of the scholarly record disseminated in Open Access (OA) journals.

Their research focuses on OA journals as at risk of vanishing, and “especially small-scale and APC-free journals […] with limited financial resources” that often “opt for lightweight technical solutions” and “cannot afford to enroll in preservation schemes.” The authors have used data available in the Directory of Open Access Journals to come up with the conclusion that just under half of the journals indexed in DOAJ participate in preservation schemes. Their findings “suggest that current approaches to digital preservation are successful in archiving content from larger journals and established publishing houses but leave behind those that are more at risk.” They call for new preservation initiatives “to develop alternative pathways […] better suited for smaller journals that operate without the support of large, professional publishers.” …”

Adoption of the Open Access Business Model in Scientific Journal Publishing: A Cross-disciplinary Study | Björk | College & Research Libraries

Abstract:  Scientific journal publishers have rapidly converted during the past 25 years to predominantly electronic dissemination, but the reader-pays business model continues to dominate the market. Open Access (OA) publishing, where the articles are freely readable on the net, has slowly increased its market share to near 20 percent but has failed to fulfill the visions of rapid proliferation predicted by many early proponents. The growth of OA has also been very uneven across fields of science. We report market shares of open access in 18 Scopus-indexed disciplines ranging from 27 percent (agriculture) to 7 percent (business). The differences become far more pronounced for journals published in the four countries that dominate commercial scholarly publishing (US, UK, Germany, and the Netherlands). We present contrasting developments within six academic disciplines. Availability of funding to pay publication charges, pressure from research funding agencies, and the diversity of discipline-specific research communication cultures arise as potential explanations for the observed differences.

 

Extending the reach and discovery of Quality OA journals through world-wide community engagement in their curation – Charleston Hub

“The mission of the Directory of Open Access Journals is “to increase the visibility, accessibility, reputation, usage and impact of quality, peer-reviewed, open access scholarly research journals globally, regardless of discipline, geography or language. [www.doaj.org/about#aimscope].” To achieve an important part of that mission DOAJ engages more than 20 “DOAJ Ambassadors” and almost one hundred volunteer editors carefully chosen from researchers, educators, and librarians around the world. This session will describe how this process of selecting and managing these volunteers is carried out at DOAJ. Attendees will learn what criteria are applied to accept peer-reviewed Open Access journals into DOAJ, as well as the additional criteria by which a journal can obtain the “DOAJ Seal.” Since alignment with the interests of libraries and universities is one of the core principles for DOAJ, seeing how DOAJ reaches out, recruits, and manages volunteers from the academic community reveals one of the ways in which alignment of DOAJ with the interests of libraries is carried out in practice….”

Extending the reach and discovery of Quality OA journals through world-wide community engagement in their curation – Charleston Hub

“The mission of the Directory of Open Access Journals is “to increase the visibility, accessibility, reputation, usage and impact of quality, peer-reviewed, open access scholarly research journals globally, regardless of discipline, geography or language. [www.doaj.org/about#aimscope].” To achieve an important part of that mission DOAJ engages more than 20 “DOAJ Ambassadors” and almost one hundred volunteer editors carefully chosen from researchers, educators, and librarians around the world. This session will describe how this process of selecting and managing these volunteers is carried out at DOAJ. Attendees will learn what criteria are applied to accept peer-reviewed Open Access journals into DOAJ, as well as the additional criteria by which a journal can obtain the “DOAJ Seal.” Since alignment with the interests of libraries and universities is one of the core principles for DOAJ, seeing how DOAJ reaches out, recruits, and manages volunteers from the academic community reveals one of the ways in which alignment of DOAJ with the interests of libraries is carried out in practice….”

Flipping the switch: how a hybrid journal went open access – Physics World

Tell us about Materials Research Express (MRX)?

MRX is an open-access journal that focuses on interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research. Published by IOP Publishing, which publishes Physics World, it is devoted to publishing new experimental and theoretical research in the properties, characterization, design and fabrication of all classes of materials including biomaterials, nanomaterials, polymers, smart materials, electronics, thin films and more. The journal, which offers rapid peer review, has an international editorial board that is led by the journal’s editor-in-chief, Meyya Meyyappan from NASA’s Ames Research Centre in the US….”