Italy will require pharma to disclose public funding for R&D

“Amid growing clamor for more transparency from the pharmaceutical industry, Italy has become the first country to require drug makers to disclose data about public funding for any of their medicines during negotiations over pricing and reimbursement.

As a result, the Italian Medicines Agency, known as AIFA, will have insight into various costs, such as R&D and marketing, that drug companies incur, as well as data on revenue, patents, and prices offered to other countries, according to a decree published last week. The decree is notable, in part, because Italy is a Group of Seven country with a significant market for the global pharmaceutical industry….”

 

Investments in Open: Canadian Research Libraries’ Expenditures on Services, Staff, and Infrastructures in Support of Open Scholarship

“Widespread sharing of research and scholarship is fundamental for addressing many of today’s most important problems. Research libraries have been at the forefront of promoting open scholarship for many years. They play a pivotal role in the creation, management, discovery, and use of scholarship and have been expanding their financial contributions towards open scholarship over time. However, to date, their investments in “open” have not been well-documented, nor have they always been widely recognized by the broader community. In 2019, the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) undertook a comprehensive survey of CARL member libraries’ investments in open scholarship in order to have a better understanding of what is being spent by Canadian academic libraries on open services, platforms, content, and infrastructures. The survey found that the total, aggregate spending on open for all 28 responding libraries was $23 million CAD, with an average spend per institution of $827,086 CAD. This represents an average of 3.09% of the total library budget spent on open, ranging from 0.88% to 7.23% across respondent libraries. By far, the largest category of investment is in local staff, with an average of 74% of the libraries’ open investments going toward salaries. On average, respondent libraries have about 7 FTEs working in open activities, scattered across a number of areas: digitized content, scholarly communications, open repositories, and research data management (including staff contributing to the national Portage project). The second largest category of spending on open were funds directed to publishers through several means: consortial licences via the Canadian Research Knowledge Network (CRKN) or, in Ontario, the regional association Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL) via Scholars Portal, institutional membership with open access publishers, and payment of article processing charges (APCs). This amounted to an average of 14% of total open spending, or approximately $3.2 million CAD in total, 80% of which was directed toward licences with open access publishers or platforms. The rest of the open investments, approximately 12%, were spent on a wide variety of other types of open services, platforms and infrastructures….”

Auf dem Weg zur Open Access Transformation | Informationspraxis

From Google’s English:  Since 2010, the DFG program “Open Access Publishing” has been a central instrument for the institutional funding of open access publications at German universities. In the course of a DFG program evaluation, the central library of the Research Center Jülich created a data analysis that shows the publication output of the sponsored universities illuminated in 2011-2017. The results of the study lead to the following findings:

The DFG program has proven to be structuring for the funded universities, which thus have a publication fund located at the university library.
Open access publishing is a trend at German universities, as the tenfold increase in the gold open access rate at the sponsored and non-sponsored universities between 2006 and 2017 shows.
The German university publication system is still a long way from a complete open access transformation, since the proportion of closed access publications has declined little and the absolute number of closed access publications has even increased.
With a few exceptions, the level of APCs among the publishers under review increases significantly and on average exceeds the price increase rates for subscription magazines.

Recommendations for action at the end of the article show what funded institutions and funding agencies should take into account in future monitoring procedures.

Library’s linked-data project gets new grant | Cornell Chronicle

“A $2.5 million grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation is boosting a multi-institution initiative to develop tools and workflows that improve the sharing of catalog data among libraries and help internet users discover library resources on the web.

Known as Linked Data for Production, the project is part of a long-term collaboration among Cornell University Library, Stanford Libraries and the School of Library and Information Science at the University of Iowa.

Through linked data, information about books and other items in library records will be enhanced by related information from external online sources….”

Library’s linked-data project gets new grant | Cornell Chronicle

“A $2.5 million grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation is boosting a multi-institution initiative to develop tools and workflows that improve the sharing of catalog data among libraries and help internet users discover library resources on the web.

Known as Linked Data for Production, the project is part of a long-term collaboration among Cornell University Library, Stanford Libraries and the School of Library and Information Science at the University of Iowa.

Through linked data, information about books and other items in library records will be enhanced by related information from external online sources….”

NEH Awards $1 Million in CARES Act Grants to University Presses | National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)

“The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) has awarded $1 million in CARES Act economic stabilization grants to ten university presses to help preserve jobs in scholarly publishing and provide for the continued publication of important academic research in the humanities during the pandemic….

Additionally, a grant to Cornell University Press will retain full- and part-time staff positions to complete “Open Access in a Closed World,” an effort to create a permanent and accessible repository for the press’s Open Access materials on the humanities and social sciences….

In separate funding, NEH has made twelve new awards to university presses to publish free ebooks of recent scholarly publications, the first awards under NEH’s Fellowships Open Book Program. …”

NEH Awards $1 Million in CARES Act Grants to University Presses | National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)

“The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) has awarded $1 million in CARES Act economic stabilization grants to ten university presses to help preserve jobs in scholarly publishing and provide for the continued publication of important academic research in the humanities during the pandemic….

Additionally, a grant to Cornell University Press will retain full- and part-time staff positions to complete “Open Access in a Closed World,” an effort to create a permanent and accessible repository for the press’s Open Access materials on the humanities and social sciences….

In separate funding, NEH has made twelve new awards to university presses to publish free ebooks of recent scholarly publications, the first awards under NEH’s Fellowships Open Book Program. …”