ZERO-TEXTBOOK COST (ZTC) DEGREES INCLUDED IN GOVERNOR NEWSOM’S BUDGET – Michelson 20MM Foundation

“On January 10th Governor Newsom released his budget proposal. In it was a $10 million allocation for the Zero-Textbook Cost Degree program. The program was created in 2016-17 to reduce the overall cost of education for students and decrease the time it takes students to complete degree programs offered by community colleges. “ZTC Degrees” are associates degrees or career technical education certificates comprised entirely of courses that eliminate additional textbook and material fees through the use of high quality, no-cost learning content with an emphasis on open educational resources (OER)….”

Infrastructure and Capacity Building

Crossposted from Platypus. I was delighted this week to be notified that the Humanities Commons team has received an Infrastructure and Capacity Building Challenge grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. NEH Announces $30.9 Million for 188 Humanities Projects Nationwide: https://t.co/Zt20RWxTpn pic.twitter.com/nnZBRwhQNi — NEH (@NEHgov) January 14, 2020 This grant is the foundation of … Continue reading Infrastructure and Capacity Building ?

Infrastructure and Capacity Building – Kathleen Fitzpatrick

“I was delighted this week to be notified that the Humanities Commons team has received an Infrastructure and Capacity Building Challenge grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities….”

Decentralized Science. Bringing transparency to academic peer reviewing

“P2P Models explores a new way of building collaborative platforms harnessing the blockchain. We are building a software framework to build decentralized infrastructure for collaborative economy organizations that do not depend on central authorities….

We are a team based at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), developing an ERC Granted research project led by Samer Hassan, Faculty Associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University and Associate Professor at UCM. Thus, we combine research and software development efforts, and we have to navigate the jungle of academic papers and publications and survive the academic’s “publish or perish” curse.  As do many others, we think academic publication and peer reviewing can be improved in many ways, such as its fairness, quality, performance, cost, etc. Moreover, an oligopoly of publishers owns more than half of the market, making a large profit from the free work of editors, reviewers and authors. Fortunately, in P2P Models we are studying how blockchain based solutions can help us improve the governance and value distribution in online communities, and we decided to apply our own proposals to improve science publication and peer reviewing. This is how the Decentralized Science project was born, as an effort to solve the problems we were facing in academia and promote the values of Open Access and Open Science movements with the tools we were designing and researching in the P2P Models project….”

Decentralized Science. Bringing transparency to academic peer reviewing

“P2P Models explores a new way of building collaborative platforms harnessing the blockchain. We are building a software framework to build decentralized infrastructure for collaborative economy organizations that do not depend on central authorities….

We are a team based at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), developing an ERC Granted research project led by Samer Hassan, Faculty Associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University and Associate Professor at UCM. Thus, we combine research and software development efforts, and we have to navigate the jungle of academic papers and publications and survive the academic’s “publish or perish” curse.  As do many others, we think academic publication and peer reviewing can be improved in many ways, such as its fairness, quality, performance, cost, etc. Moreover, an oligopoly of publishers owns more than half of the market, making a large profit from the free work of editors, reviewers and authors. Fortunately, in P2P Models we are studying how blockchain based solutions can help us improve the governance and value distribution in online communities, and we decided to apply our own proposals to improve science publication and peer reviewing. This is how the Decentralized Science project was born, as an effort to solve the problems we were facing in academia and promote the values of Open Access and Open Science movements with the tools we were designing and researching in the P2P Models project….”

DOAB and OAPEN jointly selected for second funding cycle SCOSS | OAPEN

“The Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services (SCOSS) has selected OAPEN and DOAB for its second funding cycle. 

SCOSS is appealing to institutions invested in Open Access and Open Science – academic institutions and their libraries, research institutes, funding organisations, national and regional governments, international organisations, learned societies and service providers to consider helping support one or more of the selected services through a three-year commitment.

SCOSS was formed in early 2017 with the purpose of providing a new coordinated cost-sharing framework for enabling the broader OA and OS community to support the non-commercial services on which it depends. In its pilot funding cycle, more than 1.5 million euros have been pledged by more than 200 institutions worldwide to help secure the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) and SHERPA Ro/MEO. Apart from OAPEN and DOAB, the second funding cycle includes the Public Knowledge Project (PKP) and OpenCitations. More information can be found here: www.scoss.org

SCOSS encourages supporting both DOAB and OAPEN since they are closely interlinked and share the same goal to support the transition to OA books and to increase trust in OA book publishing….”

Open Research Funders Group Reaffirms Support for Open Science | Open Research Funders Group

With news that the United States may be considering a shift in their national open access policy, the Open Research Funders Group (ORFG) reaffirms its support for the sharing of research outputs as widely and quickly as possible. The ORFG, a partnership of 16 philanthropies with assets in excess of $100 billion, believes that open access (along with open data and broader open science activities) benefits society by potentially accelerating the pace of discovery, reducing information-sharing gaps, encouraging innovation, and promoting reproducibility.  

From a practical standpoint, open access demonstrates a tangible return on taxpayer investment. Federal funds that support research have their highest impact when the results of this labor are shared, discussed, tested, and built upon with as few restrictions as possible.

Adoption of the open access business model in scientific journal publishing – A crossdisciplinary study

Abstract:  Scientific journal publishers have over the past twenty-five years rapidly converted to predominantly electronic dissemination, but the reader-pays business model continues to dominate the market. Open Access (OA) publishing, where the articles are freely readable on the net, has slowly increased its market share to near 20%, but has failed to fulfill the visions of rapid proliferation predicted by many early proponents. The growth of OA has also been very uneven across fields of science. We report market shares of open access in eighteen Scopus-indexed disciplines ranging from 27% (agriculture) to 7% (business). The differences become far more pronounced for journals published in the four countries, which dominate commercial scholarly publishing (US, UK, Germany and the Netherlands). We present contrasting developments within six academic disciplines. Availability of funding to pay publication charges, pressure from research funding agencies, and the diversity of discipline-specific research communication cultures arise as potential explanations for the observed differences.

NEH Announces Open Access Grant Program for Fellowship Books | National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)

“Today, the National Endowment for the Humanities announces a new grant opportunity, the Fellowships Open Book Program (FOBP). This program, offered to university and non-profit presses, will fund the creation of open access editions of humanities monographs whose underlying research was funded by one of the eligible NEH fellowship programs (i.e., Fellowships, Awards for Faculty, JUSFC-NEH Fellowships for Advanced Social Science Research on Japan, and the Public Scholars program).

For nearly 50 years, the prestigious NEH fellowship programs have supported the research behind thousands of important humanities and social science monographs. The new Fellowships Open Book Program will ensure that these books have the widest possible audience by making them available as free-to-download ebooks, under a Creative Commons license.

The FOBP follows the NEH/Mellon Humanities Open Book Program, which was a partnership between the NEH and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation that aimed to digitize out-of-print humanities books and release them as free ebooks. This program has shown that humanities monographs may be downloaded thousands of times once made openly available, indicating great interest in excellent humanities research. In many cases, these downloads also led to additional purchases of print copies.

This new Fellowships Open Book Program has several enhanced features, many of which were suggested by the field:…”

2019 Scholarly Communications Research Grant Recipients Announced – ACRL Insider

“ACRL is pleased to announce the recipients of its Scholarly Communications Research Grants in 2019. These grants of up to $5,000 each support new research that will contribute to more inclusive systems of scholarly communications in areas suggested by the 2019 report Open and Equitable Scholarly Communications: Creating a More Inclusive Future (available for download or purchase).

The selection committee from ACRL’s Research and Scholarly Environment Committee chose seven proposals from a highly competitive round of applications. The grant recipients are:

Tatiana Bryant (Adelphi University) and Camille Thomas (Florida State University) for a project titled “Attitudes Towards Open Access Publishing Amongst Faculty of Color”
Jennifer Chan (University of California, Los Angeles) and Juleah Swanson (University of Colorado Boulder) for a project titled “SCORE Analysis: Leveraging Institutional Data to Bring Balance Back into the Scholarly Landscape”
Amanda Makula and Laura Turner (University of San Diego) for a project titled “Collaborative Collection Development: Inviting Community-Owned Public Scholarship into the Academic Library”
Gemmicka Piper (Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis) for a project titled “Barriers to Minority Faculty Open Knowledge Production”
Mantra Roy (San Jose State University) for a project titled “Global South Speaks: A Librarianship Perspective”
Teresa Schultz and Elena Azadbakht (University of Nevada, Reno) for a project titled “Accessible Open Educational Resources Project”
Carolyn Sheffield, Michelle Flinchbaugh (University of Maryland, Baltimore County), Carolyn Cox (University of Baltimore), Adam Zukowski (Towson University), Robin Sinn, Caitlin Carter (Johns Hopkins University), Katherine Pitcher (St. Mary’s College), Trevor Muñoz, and Terry Owens (University of Maryland, College Park) for a project titled “A Roadmap to the Future of Promotion & Tenure”…”