scite awarded $1.5 million Fast Track SBIR Grant from the National Institutes of Health to expand the use of Smart Citations

“scite, a platform for the discovery and evaluation of scientific articles, today announced it has been awarded $1.5 million from Phase II of its Fast-Track Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)….”

ENABLING FAIR DATA PROJECT – COPDESS

“The Laura and John Arnold Foundation has awarded a grant to a coalition of groups representing the international Earth and space science community, convened by the American Geophysical Union (AGU), to develop standards that will connect researchers, publishers, and data repositories in the Earth, space, and environmental sciences to enable FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable) data on a large scale. This project will accelerate scientific discovery and enhance the integrity, transparency, and reproducibility of this data.”

Igniting Change: Our Next Steps Towards Open Data Metrics

“Since 2014, the Make Data Count (MDC) initiative has focused on building the social and technical infrastructure for the development of research data metrics. With funding from the National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, and Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the initiative has transformed from a research project with an aim to understand what researchers value about their data, to an infrastructure development project, and now into a full-fledged adoption initiative.  The team is proud to announce additional funding from the Sloan Foundation to focus on widespread adoption of standardized data usage and data citation practices, the building blocks for open research data metrics.”

ScholCommLab co-director receives funding to analyze patterns of how research data is cited and reused  – Scholarly Communications Lab | ScholCommLab

“Have you ever wondered what motivates researchers to reuse open data and what makes them cite (or not cite) datasets in their work? Or how sharing, reusing and citing open data differs between research areas or changes during a researcher’s career?

ScholCommLab co-director Stefanie was awarded $199,929 US ($281,660 CDN) by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to fund Meaningful Data Counts, an interdisciplinary project exploring a range of questions about scholarly data use and citation. Together with co-PI Isabella Peters, Professor of Web Science at the ZBW Leibniz Information Centre for Economics and CAU Kiel University (Germany), Stefanie and her team will conduct the basic research necessary to understand how datasets are viewed, used, cited, and remixed….”

APCs in the Wild | Open research | Springer Nature

“The whitepaper which was published in April 2020, explores data from Springer Nature authors on the source of article processing charge (APC) funding, along with feedback from institutional interviews to facilitate a greater understanding of where funding for APCs originates and how these sources are being used. 

Accelerating the transition to OA will involve bringing together multiple different funding streams, as well as tackling complex questions regarding redistribution of existing funds. Developments in OA business models and infrastructure are improving the ability to monitor article OA status and spending, a step that is crucial to enabling institutions and research funders to make informed decisions about funding for Gold OA, in particular with regard to agreements with publishers. However, there are still many APCs ‘in the wild’, in other words payments that are harder to monitor and that institutions and funders may be unaware of. This report explores the scale of ‘wild’ funding streams that remain for the most part unmonitored but which could be harnessed to accelerate a transition to OA….”

APCs in the Wild | Open research | Springer Nature

“The whitepaper which was published in April 2020, explores data from Springer Nature authors on the source of article processing charge (APC) funding, along with feedback from institutional interviews to facilitate a greater understanding of where funding for APCs originates and how these sources are being used. 

Accelerating the transition to OA will involve bringing together multiple different funding streams, as well as tackling complex questions regarding redistribution of existing funds. Developments in OA business models and infrastructure are improving the ability to monitor article OA status and spending, a step that is crucial to enabling institutions and research funders to make informed decisions about funding for Gold OA, in particular with regard to agreements with publishers. However, there are still many APCs ‘in the wild’, in other words payments that are harder to monitor and that institutions and funders may be unaware of. This report explores the scale of ‘wild’ funding streams that remain for the most part unmonitored but which could be harnessed to accelerate a transition to OA….”

SCOSS – The Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services – Facilitating funding to help ensure the long-term sustainability of the world’s Open Science infrastructure

SCOSS launched its new website on May 1, 2020. 

“The Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services (SCOSS), established in 2017, is a network of influential organisations committed to helping secure OA and OS infrastructure well into the future. 

Our purpose is to help identify non-commercial services essential to Open Science, and to make qualified recommendations on which of these services should be considered for funding support. Only non-commercial services on unsound financial footing are eligible. SCOSS provides the framework and funding structure, vetting potential candidates based on a defined set of criteria. The most eligible of those that pass the vigorous evaluation are then presented to the global OA/OS community of stakeholders with an appeal for monetary support in a crowdfunding-style approach.

 

SCOSS-supported open science infrastructure provides the scientific and scholarly community with resources and services to access, share, and assess research. SCOSS is a pragmatic approach to investing in open infrastructure; one that allows stakeholder institutions to participate in the direct and immediate funding of essential infrastructure. It is not the only pathway or means to invest in open infrastructure.

 

Encouragingly, since 2018, there has been a flurry of activity in this space. SCOSS runs parallel with a range of important, ambitious efforts aimed at investing in and supporting open infrastructure.

 

Though our approaches may differ, we all share the same goal of investing in open infrastructure. There is still much to be done before we have a global answer for how best to efficiently and effectively secure the future of open science infrastructure. Working together on this as a community is essential. In September 2018, a new initiative was launched called Invest in Open Infrastructure, where those engaged in this area regularly gather to update each other on their approaches, and to explore how we can move forward together. SCOSS is an active and proud member of this group.”

SCOSS – The Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services – Facilitating funding to help ensure the long-term sustainability of the world’s Open Science infrastructure

SCOSS launched its new website on May 1, 2020. 

“The Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services (SCOSS), established in 2017, is a network of influential organisations committed to helping secure OA and OS infrastructure well into the future. 

Our purpose is to help identify non-commercial services essential to Open Science, and to make qualified recommendations on which of these services should be considered for funding support. Only non-commercial services on unsound financial footing are eligible. SCOSS provides the framework and funding structure, vetting potential candidates based on a defined set of criteria. The most eligible of those that pass the vigorous evaluation are then presented to the global OA/OS community of stakeholders with an appeal for monetary support in a crowdfunding-style approach.

 

SCOSS-supported open science infrastructure provides the scientific and scholarly community with resources and services to access, share, and assess research. SCOSS is a pragmatic approach to investing in open infrastructure; one that allows stakeholder institutions to participate in the direct and immediate funding of essential infrastructure. It is not the only pathway or means to invest in open infrastructure.

 

Encouragingly, since 2018, there has been a flurry of activity in this space. SCOSS runs parallel with a range of important, ambitious efforts aimed at investing in and supporting open infrastructure.

 

Though our approaches may differ, we all share the same goal of investing in open infrastructure. There is still much to be done before we have a global answer for how best to efficiently and effectively secure the future of open science infrastructure. Working together on this as a community is essential. In September 2018, a new initiative was launched called Invest in Open Infrastructure, where those engaged in this area regularly gather to update each other on their approaches, and to explore how we can move forward together. SCOSS is an active and proud member of this group.”

Jisc Repositories Dynamic Purchasing System

“Jisc is creating a Repository Purchasing Framework (a Dynamic Purchasing System), following feedback from the UK research sector and our members about the difficulties of procuring repository services, and the need for leadership and minimum standards in this area.

 

How will it work? 

 

The framework will set out minimum standards that suppliers must comply with in order to have their product included. Suppliers will apply to be included, with the first wave of awards completed in the Spring. Additional suppliers can be added at any time. 

 

Our members will be able to use the framework to run mini competitions with suppliers, using standard templates provided, and adding additional requirements of their own, if necessary. The Jisc framework team will administer the process, sending clarifications and responses to the member, who will then use their criteria to identify the preferred supplier. If a supplier is selected, Jisc notifies all bidders of the result and contracts are between the preferred supplier and member are drawn up.  

 

Benefits and opportunities for members

 

The framework will reduce the procurement burden for members: it will facilitate a light touch procurement process for members, as the due diligence and OJEU requirements will have already been fulfilled.  Members can focus solely on their specific requirements. 
Many members are undertaking research systems reviews with possibility of re-procuring for post-REF 2021, so this is a good moment to introduce this framework. 
Members can be confident that the services included use a clear set of sector standards   
The market for such services becomes more transparent, efficient and effective.  
Members get better value for money. …”

Arcadia Grant Supports the Publication of Open Access Monographs at the MIT Press

“I’m excited to announce that the MIT Press has published its first open access (OA) monographs on the MIT Press Direct platform. Supported by a generous grant from the Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin, the project is part of a larger initiative to explore alternatives to the traditional market-based business model for professional and scholarly works on specialized subjects.

 

In 2019, the MIT Press received a three-year $850,000 grant from the Arcadia Fund to perform a broad-based monograph publishing cost analysis and to develop and openly disseminate a durable financial framework and business plan for OA monographs. As part of the project, the Press will also undertake a pilot program to implement the resulting framework for scholarly front and backlist titles….”