Rivet

“Educators around the world are encouraging better reading practice with Rivet. With Rivet’s real-time feedback and word help, kids can practice independently without getting stuck. Encourage your students’ families to download Rivet for free today!…

More books: Rivet has a rapidly growing digital library of over 3,000 free books across 14 categories in a kid-friendly interface.

Appropriate content: Every book in our library is carefully reviewed by content quality experts and placed across 8 reading levels. 

Interactive fun: Game-like features such as points and badges, as well as self-selected avatars and themes keep students  excited and motivated to read….”

Open source and open data

“There’s currently an ongoing debate about the value of data and whether internet companies should do more to share their data with others. At Google we’ve long believed that open data and open source are good not only for us and our industry, but also benefit the world at large.

Our commitment to open source and open data has led us to share datasets, services and software with everyone. For example, Google released the Open Images dataset of 36.5 million images containing nearly 20,000 categories of human-labeled objects. With this data, computer vision researchers can train image recognition systems. Similarly, the millions of annotated videos in the YouTube-8M collection can be used to train video recognition.

With respect to language processing, we’ve shared the Natural Questions database, which contains 307,373 human-generated questions and answers. We’ve also made available the Trillion Word Corpus, which is based on words used on public web pages, and the Ngram Viewer, that can be used to explore the more than 25 million books in Google Books. These collections can be used for statistical machine translation, speech recognition, spelling correction, entity detection, information extraction and other language research.

And these are only a few  examples of a much broader activity: Google AI currently lists 62 datasets of this sort that we’re making available to the research community.   …”

How I made my own open-access “research portal” – Devpolicy Blog from the Development Policy Centre

It is difficult – but not impossible – to access academic articles if you don’t have access to journal subscriptions. In this blog, I go through my experience in trying to gain access to academic articles and data while working at the University of Papua New Guinea (UPNG), and how I tried to make the process as easy and efficient as possible. I hope that by sharing the story, and sharing the research portal that I created, that researchers without access to journal subscriptions have more of a chance to find the information they need.

The portal aggregates over 750 sources of online, open data, academic and government articles and makes them searchable through a customisable Google search tool. Most of the work was in finding these resources; putting them in the custom Google search tool was simple. I provide a link to an Excel sheet with all the sources below….”

Sapping Attention: How badly is Google Books search broken, and why?

I periodically write about Google Books here, so I thought I’d point out something that I’ve noticed recently that should be concerning to anyone accustomed to treating it as the largest collection of books: it appears that when you use a year constraint on book search, the search index has dramatically constricted to the point of being, essentially, broken….

What’s going on? I don’t know. I guess I blame the lawyers: I suspect that the reasons have to do with the way the Google books project has become a sort of Herculaneum-on-the-Web, frozen in time at the moment that anti-Books lawsuits erupted in earnest 11 years ago. The site is still littered with pre-2012 branding and icons, and the still-live “project history” page ends with the words “stay tuned…” after describing their annual activity for 2007….”

Google Arts & Culture Digitizes Artifacts Following Brazil Museum Fire

“Earlier this year, 20 million irreplaceable artifacts housed by Brazil’s National Museumwere lost in a fire. As the museum did not have a platform for viewing most of these works digitally, many people feared that their memory would be lost forever. However, thanks to a two-year-old project spearheaded by Google, a lucky selection of these priceless pieces will live a second life online.

 

In 2016, Google Arts & Culture teamed up with the Museu Nacional in an effort to digitize its collections. Using Street View imagery, the initial goal of this undertaking was “to bring their collection online—so that anyone, anywhere in the world could see and learn about these ancient artifacts.” Since the fire, however, this project has served a much greater purpose.

With a couple clicks of a mouse, users are transported to the museum as it once stood. Featuring high-resolution photographs that offer 360-degree views of both the artifacts and the galleries they once inhabited, this invaluable project lets users wander through the lost museum and wade through some of its destroyed objects. Ancient sculptures, scientific specimens, and Luzia, the oldest fossilized human remains found in the Americas, are just some of the pieces immortalized in this virtual treasure trove….”

Google Virtual Tour Preserves Collections Destroyed in Brazil Museum Fire | Smart News | Smithsonian

“In early September, a fire roared through the 200-year-old National Museum of Brazil in Rio de Janeiro, destroying up to 90 percent of its precious collections. The extent of the damages was “incalculable,” Brazil President Michel Temer stated on Twitter at the time. “Two hundred years of work, research and knowledge have been lost.”

 

While it is true that little can be done to restore so many of the museum’s irreplaceable specimens and artifacts, a recently launched Google Arts & Culture project hopes to see the institution live on in the digital realm. As Kelly Richman-Abodou reports for My Modern Met, Street View imagery has made it possible to take a virtual tour of the museum as it stood before tragedy struck.

In what would prove to be a fortuitous collaboration, Google started working with the National Museum of Brazil in 2016 to digitize the museum’s collections and capture its interior through “high-resolution photography, photogrammetry, 3D laser scanning, and virtual and augmented reality,” writes Chance Coughenour, program manager of Google Arts & Culture, in a blog post. Google has embarked on similar projects with many other museums and heritage sites, but its partnership with the National Museum of Brazil has become particularly important in the wake of the fire….”

I deleted the Google+ chemlambda collection | chorasimilarity

“This 400 posts collection, 60 000 000 views,  was as much a work of research popularization as a work of art. Google cannot be trusted with keeping high density data (scientific, art, etc). Read here about this.

It pained me to delete it, but it had to be done. It was harder than when I quit Facebook, Twitter.

 

The collection and richer material exist, I have them. Still, the Github repository is available, as well as the github.io demos. For example, the dodecahedron multiplication animation used as background for a conference site of statebox.io was made from a screencast of a d3.js which can be seen  here….”

MIT, Google, Cisco and USPTO create Prior Art Archive for better patents | TechCrunch

“The patent system is broken — there are too many ways to list here, really. The problems surrounding prior art are certainly among them, and a team of high profile companies and organizations are joining forces to address some of the these with the Prior Art Archive.

The database is a collaboration between MIT’s Media Lab, Google,  Cisco and the United States Patent and Trademark Office, which certainly has the most to gain here. Using the MIT-hosted archive, patent applicants can find easily accessible examples of prior art and other technical information for reference….”

Google and research data · Elephant in the Lab

“Therefore, we need better tools for data discovery. But I do not believe that Google Dataset Discovery is the right answer. It represents a proprietary and closed system on top of our own data. This is a system that benefits massively from researchers’ labour, but where researchers will have no say in. Google is capitalizing on a movement that they have contributed nothing to. Therefore, we need an open alternative. However, at the moment it seems to me that funders, research administrators and infrastructures are content to leave it to Google. This is highly problematic, especially since we have discussed the problems of lock-in effects and other negative outcomes of proprietary infrastructure for years now….”

Inventor says Google is patenting work he put in the public domain | Ars Technica

“When Jarek Duda invented an important new compression technique called asymmetric numeral systems (ANS) a few years ago, he wanted to make sure it would be available for anyone to use. So instead of seeking patents on the technique, he dedicated it to the public domain. Since 2014, Facebook, Apple, and Google have all created software based on Duda’s breakthrough.

But now Google is seeking a patent that would give it broad rights over the use of ANS for video compression….”