Digital Innovation Hub | EOSC Hub

“The EOSC Digital Innovation Hub (DIH) is a mechanism for private companies to collaborate with public sector institutions in order to access technical services, research data, and human capital.

The DIH will kick-start with six business pilots, pre-selected during the project’s preparation phase. The support given by the DIH to the business pilots will open the benefits of the European Open Science Cloud to private companies.

The EOSC-hub DIH is open for more collaborations. If you are looking for new opportunities to advance your business, we invite you to contact us now to identify how you can become part of the European Open Science Cloud….”

OpenAIRE and FOSTER series of webinars and tutorials! | FOSTER

Open Access Week 2018 is almost here (October 22nd to 26th) and FOSTER and OpenAIRE are once again joining forces for a new series of webinars and tutorials!

 

In this year’s interactive, mixed approach, you’ll have the chance to subscribe to dedicated ‘tracks’, each of which involves reviewing 1 or 2 short online tutorials along with some supporting information. We’ll even throw in an old-fashioned webinar here and there!

You can subscribe to one (or all!) of these tracks and we’ll provide you with all relevant information you need the week starting October 15th. You can browse the tutorials and learning materials at your own pace, and then bring any questions you might have to dedicated Q&A sessions during Open Access Week. We’ll have a range of Open Science experts on hand to help answer your questions.

All tutorials and webinars will be accessible without subscribing. However, if you would like to submit any questions beforehand, receive reminders or want to be kept in the loop afterwards, you’ll need to register….”

CP2OA: Participants from across North America converge to move the needle on open access | UC Berkeley Library News

“Can we move more quickly toward an open access publishing world in which all scholarly literature is free to read? While this may seem like a daunting objective, 125 representatives of libraries, consortia, and author communities throughout North America came together this week for a two-day working forum to develop action plans for how they might reach this goal.

The Choosing Pathways to Open Access, or CP2OA, working forum, sponsored by University of California’s Council of University Librarians, convened Oct. 16-17 on the UC Berkeley campus. Participants arrived from more than 80 institutions, nearly 30 states, and four Canadian provinces. The goal was for everyone to engage in action-focused deliberations about a range of open access, or OA, funding strategies, and leave with their own customized plans for how they will repurpose subscription and other funds within their home organization or community — and more broadly, through collective efforts, move the OA needle forward.

Did it work? Decidedly so….”

The European Union Promotes Open Access Amid Concerns Over Publishing Industry and International Policy Implications | Open Science

“As the European Commission seeks to obtain broad international support for its Plan S, such as in the United States, publishers may be significantly affected by the elimination of Open Access embargo periods on which Green and hybrid Open Access models critically depend for economic sustainability.”

Community call: Open source technology development for science communications and publishing | Events | eLife

“In this community call, at 11am New York | 4pm London on October 24, 2018, we invite the developers and the users of technology for science communications and publishing from all corners to join in and share projects that are underway, learn more about what others are up to and how they’ve solved tricky problems, and consider where collaboration can contribute to the path forward….”

Georgia v. Public.Resources.Org

“Today, we are presented with the question of whether the annotations contained in the Official Code of Georgia Annotated (OCGA), authored by the Georgia General Assembly and made an inextricable part of the official codification of Georgia’s laws, may be copyrighted by the State of Georgia. Answering this question means confronting profound and difficult issues about the nature of law in our society and the rights of citizens to have unfettered access to the legal edicts that govern their lives. After a thorough review of the law, and an examination of the annotations, we conclude that no valid copyright interest can be asserted in any part of the OCGA….”

Cambridge University Press issues public statement on Plan S | Cambridge University Press

“We fully endorse the benefits of open research and recognize the recent announcements about Plan S as an important contribution to the conversation about the ongoing transition.

There is a wide range of views about how to move forward with open research across different parts of the global academic community, which means the debate about how it should develop needs a process of wide consultation, as happened with the UK’s Finch report on open access six years ago.

We believe there are a number of specific developments which could help open research and its longer-term sustainability, including areas we have been working on such as:

1)    Wider adoption of new business models which have been put in place in some countries, particularly models allowing APC-free open access including read-and-publish deals;

2)    Improvements to the hybrid journal model to support academic communities where a full transition to open access isn’t yet possible;

3)    A community standard for a fair and balanced Green OA policy, with publishers supporting institutions to meet funders’ open access requirements;

4)  Ensuring academic freedom for researchers about where they can publish….”

In Review: a new way to open up the submissions and peer review process – Research in progress blog

“That’s why we’ve created a new service, In Review. Powered by Research Square, In Review offers authors a personal dashboard to easily track the status of their manuscript, and the opportunity to share it with the wider community earlier in the submission and peer review process. In the first instance, this service will be available across four BMC journals….

By using In Review authors will be able to:

  • Share their work while it is under review and engage the wider community in discussion (through the Hypothes.is open annotation tool)
  • Track the status of their manuscript on a more granular level – including number of reviewers invited, number of reports received, and immediate access to reviewer reports
  • Demonstrate the integrity of their work with a transparent editorial checklist
  • Benefit from early sharing, including potential for earlier citations and collaboration opportunities…”

Participant Experiences and Financial Impacts: Findings from Year 2 of Achieving the Dream’s OER Degree Initiative | Achieving the Dream

“This report expands on last year’s report with updated course and enrollment data as well as new findings about students’ perceptions of their OER courses and the institutional costs and actual student savings of OER degree pathways. A final report in September 2019 will include findings on student and course outcome data. Here are several highlights from this report that caught our attention:

  • The Initiative has spurred significant expansion of OER courses and enrollments at participating colleges.
  • Students find OER materials more relevant, easier to navigate, and better aligned with learning objectives than traditional textbooks.
  • Faculty see increased student engagement with OER materials.
  • College leaders see OER degrees connected to other institutional strategic goals, including affordability, increased access and equity, decreased time to degree, and improved pedagogy.
  • Students realize significant savings from use of free and open course materials, savings that can help them with financial challenges that might interfere with their ability to continue and succeed in their program of study….”

Free Textbooks Are Not Always Free: New Study Analyzes OER’s Costs to Colleges | EdSurge News

“When professors shift to assigning Open Educational Resources instead of publisher-produced textbooks, the move typically saves students money (and it can be a significant amount). But OER is not free, since it costs money to develop the materials, takes time for professors to evaluate and adopt them, and typically involves other campus-support services as well.

report released last week gives perhaps the most detailed accounting of the pricetag to colleges looking to make signiciant moves to OER….”