Wikipedia Editors Are Fighting The Coronavirus Both Online And Offline

““It is actually rare for me to become as involved in a set of articles as I have been in the coronavirus articles,” Dekimasu says. “However, there is a clear need for people to edit them, and I feel an ethical obligation to make them as helpful as possible, since they are getting hundreds of thousands of views every day.”

Those pages include the Wikipedia article for the virus itself, known as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2, the disease it causes, COVID-19, and the ongoing global pandemic the coronavirus has caused.

 

With so many eyes on Wikipedia’s coronavirus articles, providing accurate information is more important than ever. But it’s not blatantly inaccurate information that Dekimasu worries about, but the “subtle misinformation” that can appear….”

The Society Publishers’ Coalition – a year on

“More than shared visions alone, our members are equally brought together by a desire to actively contribute to the present and future of the scholarly landscape, to affect change and directly feed into open access (OA) developments. The value in founding SocPC was partly to ensure our perspectives were heard in much wider conversations; that, combining our voices and entering into broader dialogues across the sector, we could help to enrich the research landscape and continue to support our communities through our charitable missions. …

The sharing of feedback, data, and methods has been and will continue to be integral to developing our members’ next steps towards open scholarship….

United by our common ambition to embrace open access in the interests of global research, SocPC was formed to help navigate the shifting landscape of international scholarship and improve the means through which we share knowledge and contribute to broader societal progress. Combining our members’ objectives puts us at the forefront of open scholarship agendas, enabling us to engage in and more meaningfully contribute to dialogues surrounding aspects like open data, open peer review, and a variety of associated initiatives….”

Collaborating for public access to scholarly publications: A case study of the partnership between the US Department of Energy and CHORUS – Dylla – – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

“Key points

 

The success of the CHORUS and DOE relationship is the result of nearly two decades of interactions between the DOE and a group of scientific publishers.
The relationship between CHORUS and the US federal agencies required understanding of different motivations, operations, and philosophies.
Although achieving public access was simple in principle, it required considerable effort to develop systems that satisfied all parties.
Publishers had been working with federal agencies to achieve open access before the 2013 White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, but this helped to create a path for a more fruitful relationship….”

FAIRification of Services – Two Examples | FAIRsFAIR

“The webinar is offered by FAIRsFAIR Work Package FAIR Practices: Semantics, Interoperability, and Services, and explores two facets of the FAIRification of services: the FAIR assessment framework for data services, and the features of FAIR repositories.

The FAIR principles are explicitly targeted at both metadata and data, with data here being regarded as any digital resource, asset or object (e.g., APIs, workflows, ontologies, models, and others). However, digital objects can not be made FAIR without supporting infrastructure services that are FAIR themselves.

One approach is a systematic evaluation of the FAIRness of services. In this regard, FAIRsFAIR is developing a FAIR assessment framework for data services alongside a similar framework for research software. The interim “Assessment report on ‘FAIRness of services” is the topic of the first part of the webinar. The webinar will briefly review FAIR assessment frameworks for data and other digital objects and motivate the need for a similar framework for services.

In the second part, the focus is on repositories, which not only give access (with needed restrictions) to research data and metadata, but are searchable and offer persistent identifiers which offer or enable search functionality. Deliverable 2.3 Set of FAIR data repositories features presents a list of the features of repositories which allows repositories not only to host FAIR digital objects but also to be FAIR themselves. 

After the presentations there will be time for Q&A and discussion; all feedback on the underlying reports will be welcome at the webinar and can also be offered online at the links provided above….”

Covering research preprints amid the coronavirus: 6 things to know

“Below, we highlight six key things reporters need to know about preprints, based on interviews with two people with vast experience in biomedical research: Bill Hanage, an associate professor of epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and John R. Inglis, who has launched and managed multiple academic journals and, as executive director of the nonprofit Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, co-founded medRxiv and bioRxiv….”

Preprints & COVID-19

“This work is being maintained by Gautam Dey, Srivats Venkataramanan, Sundar Naganathan, Debbie Ho, Zhang-He Goh, Kirsty Hooper, Lars Hubatsch, Mariana De Niz, Sejal Davla, Mate Palfy & Jonny Coates. For questions or queries please contact prelights@biologists.com or Jonny Coates jc2216@cam.ac.uk.”

Comment: Today (April 2, 2020) it hadn’t been updated since January 2, 2020.

The Internet Archive Chooses Readers – The Scholarly Kitchen

“Last week the Internet Archive (IA), a non-profit entity dedicated to “Universal Access to All Knowledge” decided that its answer to this clarion call is to open what it termed a “National Emergency Library.” The service is based on IA’s earlier efforts to offer “controlled digital lending,” the idea that IA loans one digitized version at a time for every print copy it sequesters — a concept based on fair use doctrine, but without legal standing. Through this model, the IA has for some time been offering access to a massive quantity of digitized – including still in-copyright — materials. Now, for the duration of the US national emergency, IA is offering access to its digitized books without any limitations based on sequestered print copies and doing so globally. “It is meant,” the IA has asserted of the National Emergency Library, “to meet a very specific, extraordinary need” as university, school and public libraries around the world have shuttered….

But the emergency library was a lot clunkier. And it made me wonder just how useful it was going to be. Perhaps we’ll get some numbers? The sign-in is more laborious. To borrow a book you must have an Internet Archive account, and agree to the 2014 terms of service. To download and read on your own screen you must also acquire an Adobe account, and then download Adobe Digital Editions (4.5). In the ritual unhindered by coronavirus, I created a new account at the Internet Archive, having failed to locate a saved password, and, same for my Adobe account, and proceeded to borrow a book for 14 days. It was Robert Gross’s 1976 The Minutemen and their World, a mainstay of undergraduate history education for more than four decades. The platform is awkward, and the reading experience is, to put it mildly, not conducive to intensive reading. Presumably my borrowed copy, via the Adobe platform, will disappear like Cinderella’s pumpkin 13 days hence. I was not overwhelmed. My students’ response to the IA Emergency Library, their expression of relief at having something to tide them over until they could get physical books from our library and through interlibrary loan – the format they consistently prioritize — suggests that the language of an emergency library was effective even if, in practice, it is more of a supplement to other digital resources….

Thus it does seem supremely odd, and quite out of step with the moment, for the Internet Archive to prioritize the needs of readers as if they can be disaggregated from the systems in which reading material is produced. If you think something should be free, you likely don’t have a very good grasp of what it costs to produce — and who needs to be paid in the course of that production. Knowledge is not found under a tree. It is not a natural but a human product, born of labor but also of talent and training. It requires investment, often from individuals, but almost always from organizations….”

Digitization in an Emergency: Fair Use/Fair Dealing and How Libraries Are Adapting to the Pandemic – Association of Research Libraries

“Fortunately, the principle of fair use—a pillar of the US copyright system—provides a crucial safety valve, as does the doctrine of fair dealing in Canada. Research libraries have taken the lead in clarifying and applying fair use and fair dealing to the present crisis. Earlier this month, a broad group of copyright experts from university libraries published a statement on fair use, explaining how, “while legal obligations do not automatically dissolve in the face of a public health crisis,” US copyright law is “well equipped to provide the flexibility necessary for the vast majority of remote learning needed at this time.” Similarly, several experts on Canadian copyright law posted a detailed analysis of why “the circumstances of the current emergency justify a broad construction of fair-dealing.”

What are these fair uses in practice? To begin with, academic libraries are necessarily digitizing more materials in response to specific demands. For example, the University of Georgia Libraries are “providing emergency scanning of print and digital materials from our collections to our faculty and students to ensure that…education and research remain continuous.” Cornell University Library has advised faculty on how to assess “whether fair use permits scanning” of physical materials for online teaching. However, selective scanning is not a comprehensive solution. As the pandemic worsens and shelter-in-place orders proliferate, many libraries have had to send all of their staff home, leaving no one to pull books from the stacks and digitize them.

In response to unprecedented exigencies, more systemic solutions may be necessary and fully justifiable under fair use and fair dealing. This includes variants of controlled digital lending (CDL), in which books are scanned and lent in digital form, preserving the same one-to-one scarcity and time limits that would apply to lending their physical copies. Even before the new coronavirus, a growing number of libraries have implemented CDL for select physical collections. For example, MIT used CDL for a collection of works that were inaccessible during the renovation of one of their libraries. The justifications for CDL, both in legal and public interest terms, are at their strongest right now, to allow for continued progress of the arts and sciences while physical library holdings are broadly inaccessible….”

Digitization in an Emergency: Fair Use/Fair Dealing and How Libraries Are Adapting to the Pandemic – Association of Research Libraries

“Fortunately, the principle of fair use—a pillar of the US copyright system—provides a crucial safety valve, as does the doctrine of fair dealing in Canada. Research libraries have taken the lead in clarifying and applying fair use and fair dealing to the present crisis. Earlier this month, a broad group of copyright experts from university libraries published a statement on fair use, explaining how, “while legal obligations do not automatically dissolve in the face of a public health crisis,” US copyright law is “well equipped to provide the flexibility necessary for the vast majority of remote learning needed at this time.” Similarly, several experts on Canadian copyright law posted a detailed analysis of why “the circumstances of the current emergency justify a broad construction of fair-dealing.”

What are these fair uses in practice? To begin with, academic libraries are necessarily digitizing more materials in response to specific demands. For example, the University of Georgia Libraries are “providing emergency scanning of print and digital materials from our collections to our faculty and students to ensure that…education and research remain continuous.” Cornell University Library has advised faculty on how to assess “whether fair use permits scanning” of physical materials for online teaching. However, selective scanning is not a comprehensive solution. As the pandemic worsens and shelter-in-place orders proliferate, many libraries have had to send all of their staff home, leaving no one to pull books from the stacks and digitize them.

In response to unprecedented exigencies, more systemic solutions may be necessary and fully justifiable under fair use and fair dealing. This includes variants of controlled digital lending (CDL), in which books are scanned and lent in digital form, preserving the same one-to-one scarcity and time limits that would apply to lending their physical copies. Even before the new coronavirus, a growing number of libraries have implemented CDL for select physical collections. For example, MIT used CDL for a collection of works that were inaccessible during the renovation of one of their libraries. The justifications for CDL, both in legal and public interest terms, are at their strongest right now, to allow for continued progress of the arts and sciences while physical library holdings are broadly inaccessible….”