Untangling Academic Publishing: A history of the relationship between commercial interests, academic prestige and the circulation of research | Zenodo

“In 2013, the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council funded a 4-year project on the editorial and commercial history of the world’s oldest-surviving scholarly journal (‘Publishing the Philosophical Transactions: a social, cultural and economic history of a learned journal, 1665-2015’, AH/K001841). The project is led by Dr Aileen Fyfe at the University of St Andrews in partnership with the Royal Society.

The project team convened a workshop at the Royal Society, 22 April 2016, on ‘The Politics of Academic Publishing, 1950-2016’. This briefing paper is informed by the contributions of those who attended that day, and we thank them for their insights. The authors of this briefing paper are a sub-group of those who attended the April 2016 workshop.

This report is based upon the primary (historical) research of the Philosophical Transactions project team, combined with a literature review, and the expertise of the other authors (principally in higher education research, and in scholarly communication)….”

Academics ‘should not sign over research copyright to publishers’ | THE News

“Academics should resist signing over the copyright of their research to a “profit-oriented” academic publisher if they can secure a licence to publish themselves, a report recommends, while university leaders must simultaneously seek ways to ensure that copyright remains with the author.

According to the report, Untangling Academic Publishing: A History of the Relationship between Commercial Interests, Academic Prestige and the Circulation of Knowledge, reforms of scholarly publishing have given “undue weight to commercial concerns” in recent years. Additionally, the “prestige economy”, in which academics compete for the kudos of having their work published by journals with high impact factors or by high-status presses, has stymied the move towards open access and “free sharing of knowledge”, it argues….”

The OpenAIRE-Connect Project : OpenAIRE blog

“OpenAIRE-Connect is an H2020 EC project, started in January 2017. The project fosters transparent evaluation of results and facilitates reproducibility of science for research communities by enabling a scientific communication ecosystem supporting the exchange of artefacts, packages of artefacts, and links between them across communities and across content providers. To this aim, OpenAIRE-Connect will introduce and implement the concept of Open Science as a Service (OSaaS) on top of the existing OpenAIRE infrastructure (http://www.openaire.eu), by delivering out-of-the-box, on-demand deployable tools in support of Open Science. OpenAIRE-Connect will realise and operate two OSaaS production services (see figure):

  • Research Community Dashboard: it will serve research communities to at publishing research artefacts (packages and links), and monitoring their research impact.
  • Catch-All Notification Broker: it will engage and mobilise content providers, and serve them with services enabling notification-based exchange of research artefacts, to leverage their transition towards Open Science paradigms.

Both services will be served on-demand according to the OSaaS approach, hence be reusable from different disciplines and providers, each with different practices and maturity levels, so as to favour a shift towards a uniform cross-community and cross-content provider scientific communication ecosystem.”

Who should speak for academics over the future of publishing? | THE Opinion

“What I find intriguing is not so much that commercial publishers have learned how to involve academics in peer review, but rather that the learned societies appear to have relinquished the intellectual leadership that [David] Martin assumed was theirs.

With so many journals now being published by so many different societies, university presses and commercial firms, disciplinary leadership is more diffuse than it was 60 years ago and no longer obviously lies with learned societies. Based on ownership, the big four commercial publishers have a clear claim to leadership in the business of academic publishing. But these firms have no grounds on which to claim leadership in the provision of academic prestige.

Given current debates about how the future of academic publishing will be shaped by technology and open access, this matters hugely – and not simply because of the cost of access to research….”

Nieuw open access-akkoord – U-Today

From Google Translate: “The agreements between the Dutch universities and Cambridge University Press (CUP) are unique, says Board Chairman Jaap Winter of the University, university association VSNU negotiator.

Aside Bought

The agreement with CUP universities have open access surrendered at once. Seventeen fully open access journals and 339 hybrid journals, Dutch researchers from June 1 to publish at no extra cost.

This is in discussions about open access as the ‘golden road’: the items are in the archives of the magazine itself and anyone can read them. Another form of open access is less far and is called the ‘green road’. Then scientists can make their articles freely accessible in an archive of their own university or at their website, but they are in the magazine itself still behind a paywall.

Oxford UP

The Dutch universities will only renew subscriptions to scientific journals and publishers open access one step closer. Negotiations with Oxford University Press this faltered .

In old subscription science actually pays twice: researchers write articles yourself and additionally paid subscriber to read the magazines. The results of (mostly publicly funded) research are also not accessible to outsiders.

The advocates of open access, including Secretary Sander Dekker, want to change that. Ideally pay science no longer to articles read , but to publish . The articles themselves are free for everyone.”

UoH, first in the country, adopts online education policy

“The University of Hyderabad (UoH) has adopted Online Educational Policy (OEP), the first Central University in the country. Addressing a joint press conference here today, University Vice chancellor Prof Appa Rao Podile and University Faculty Coordinator Prof J Prabhakar Rao, said as the European Union funded International Collaborative project (EU Project) ending this month, the University has adopted OEP. Under this policy, the University has set up an e-Learning centre where developing studio and multi media and other infrastructure with an estimated cost of About Rs 60 lakhs, will formally launch in couple of months, they informed. The aim of the centre is to promote, implement online courses designed by the teachers of the University, providing training to the teachers on developing e-Content by using enhanced technology of teaching and learning and operation, maintaining E-labs, virtual classroom, video conferencing room, they said. As per the UGS mandatory, 20 per cent of regular courses made on online by the UoH, they said the centre will also develop online courses Swayam platform which is a initiative of HRD Ministry to promote Open Educational Resources (OERs). There are plans to go for National and International collaborations for developing these, however, the centre initially focus on Capacity Buildign courses for both teachers and students, they added. Mr Prabhakar said that the EU project, which started in 2013, implemented by consortium of six university partners (four from India and two from Europe). Funding over one million Euros for the all six universities . The main objective of the project to enhance the quality, access and governance of undergraduate education in India through technology enabled learning with Indo-EU Higher Education partnerships and collaborations, he added.”

OPEN SCIENCE DB – Home

“Can’t access science research publications resulting from your tax dollar? Open Science DB is a mission-driven database led by students in life sciences and engineering. We aim to make research, especially federally funded projects, more accessible to the public by ?providing easy-to-understand summaries of peer-reviewed scientific publications….”

OpenAIRE survey about Horizon2020 template for Data Management Plans

“The European Commission provides Guidelines on FAIR Data Management in Horizon 2020. A template for writing a Data Management Plan (DMP) is provided in the annex of those Guidelines. The OpenAIRE project aims to support the Commission’s ambitions regarding Open Science and FAIR – Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable – data. Therefore we are interested to learn about your experience with this specific template.”

Open science: historical perspectives – Clear Language, Clear Mind

“After the recent London conference on Intelligence, we visited the Science Museum in South Kensington. Unfortunately, we did not have enough time to explore everything, but we did spend some time in the flight section. A number of the texts on display highlight the importance of open science, and are worth posting here….”

Several of the postings show how secrecy and patents have held back the progress of science.