Open and Shut?: Realising the BOAI vision: Peter Suber’s Advice

Peter Suber’s current high-priority recommendations for advancing open access.

Balancing ideology and feasibility: a case study on adopting and evaluating open access publishing models for a society journal within philosophy

“Open access, the notion that research output, such as journal articles, should be freely accessible to readers on the Web, is arguably in the best interest of science. In this article, we (1) describe in-depth how a society-owned philosophy journal, Nordic Wittgenstein Review, evaluated various publishing models and made an informed decision on how best to adopt open access publishing for the journal, and (2) develop and implement measures to evaluate the chosen model.”

Open and Shut?: Realising the BOAI vision: Peter Suber’s Advice

Peter Suber’s high-priority recommendations for advancing OA.

New Open Access publishing deal for Austrian researchers – Science & research news | Frontiers | Open-access publisher

“Under a landmark Open Access Publishing Framework Agreement signed today between Frontiers, the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) and the University of Vienna, Austrian researchers affiliated with or funded by these institutions can now publish their articles in Frontiers’ open access journals through a simplified process that covers article processing charges. In addition to a national discount and centralized invoicing process, the signatory institutions benefit from transparent, comprehensive reporting on expenditures and research outputs at an institutional and national level.”

Open and Shut?: Achieving the BOAI Vision: Possible Actions for Realization

“A great deal of water has passed under the bridge since 2002, but as 2017 draws to an end what should the stakeholders of scholarly communication be doing now to fully realise the vision outlined at the Budapest meeting?…Today I am publishing the response I received from Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe, Professor/ Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction in the University Library and affiliate faculty in the School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.”

The Keepers Registry

“Supporting long-term access to journal content….Discover who is looking after your e-journals….[In addition to searching for journal titles, you can browse a list of journal-preservation organizations.] The following organisations are the Keepers of digital content, working on your behalf to ensure long-term access to the scholarly and cultural record. They provide the registry with information on their archival holdings, ordered by most recent update (date of which is shown)….”

The devil you don’t know: The unexpected future of Open Access publishing | Esposito | First Monday

Abstract:  With the advent of the Internet and online publishing, the notion has arisen that access to the world’s research publications could be made available to one and all for free, presumably by shifting the costs to other places in the value chain and disintermediating publishers, a circumstance called Open Access (OA) publishing. While there are many hopes embedded in this view (lower costs, wider access, etc.), it appears more likely that Open Access will come about not through a revolution in the world of legacy publishing, but through upstart media built with the innate characteristics of the Internet in mind. An unanticipated outcome of this situation will be that the overall cost of research publications will rise, though the costs will be borne by different players, primarily authors and their proxies.

Evaluating big deal journal bundles

Abstract:  Large commercial publishers sell bundled online subscriptions to

their entire list of academic journals at prices significantly lower

than the sum of their á la carte prices. Bundle prices differ drastically

between institutions, but they are not publicly posted. The

data that we have collected enable us to compare the bundle

prices charged by commercial publishers with those of nonprofit

societies and to examine the types of price discrimination practiced

by commercial and nonprofit journal publishers. This information

is of interest to economists who study monopolist pricing,

librarians interested in making efficient use of library budgets, and

scholars who are interested in the availability of the work that

they publish.