Ensuring that UK institutions pay just once for research output

Ensuring that UK institutions pay just once for research output

Since April 2013, when RCUK and the Wellcome Trust introduced policies and funds for open access, concern has risen that the UK will end up paying twice  for research, and even footing the bill for larger contributors of research output such as the US and China. In an op-ed for The Guardian David Willetts, Minister of…

Innovating open at Mozfest

Innovating open at Mozfest

In late October, more than sixteen hundred developers, science buffs, and Open Web advocates converged on the Ravensbourne campus in South-East London to kick off MozFest, a hands-on festival dedicated to envisioning and creating the future of an open, global web. MozFest, now in its fifth year, began as a small, community-driven gathering with an…

How and why researchers share data (and why they don’t)

How and why researchers share data (and why they don’t)

I am pleased to present here results from a survey Wiley conducted into researcher views of data sharing.  Earlier this year, we contacted 90,000 researchers across a wide array of disciplines and received more than 2,250 responses from individuals engaged in active research programs. Leading up to the survey, we conducted a series of interviews…

Exploring open access publishing opportunities

Exploring open access publishing opportunities

We thought we’d extend last week’s Open Access theme a bit longer to shed some light on the various open access publishing options available.  Wiley Open Access team members Verity Emmans and Stefano Tonzani were co-authors on this post. Open access is on the rise – Simba Information predicts that total revenues collected from open access…

The cost of Open Access

The cost of Open Access

We all want Open Access – authors, readers, funders and indeed publishers alike. EMBO is keenly interested in the OA question both from a policy viewpoint and as a funder and publisher of high-level biomedical research. EMBO Press publishes four journals, two of which are fully OA and one of which, Molecular Systems Biology, was…

Celebrating a new era in scholarly publishing

Celebrating a new era in scholarly publishing

We continue our celebration of Open Access week with a reflection on the past, present and future of the movement from Deni Auclair of Outsell Inc.   This week, Deni participated in the Wiley/CCC webinar: “Open Access: Case Studies Yield Insights for Societies”.  View the recorded webinar here. In response to the rise of open access, Elsevier is quoted…

What does Open Access mean to you?

What does Open Access mean to you?

We’ve got #OAWeek fever!  We’re hosting a free webinar at 11 AM EDT today on Open Access and scholarly societies.  Register here and join us.  And, don’t forget to join our live Open Access publishing Twitter chat also today at 12 PM EDT with Allen J. Moore and Andrew Beckerman.  Follow @WileyOpenAccess and participate using #WileyOAChat. …

Open Access and the early career researcher

Open Access and the early career researcher

We’re kicking off Open Access week fittingly.  With a theme this year of “Generation Open”, highlighting the role of students and early career researchers in the open access movement, it seems appropriate to hear what this community has to say.  As a part of this generation, Wiley Advisor and Sense About Science Voice of Young Science member Daniel Amund shares his thoughts and feelings on Open…

California enacts law to increase public access to publicly funded research – Creative Commons

On Monday California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law AB 609–the California Taxpayer Access to Publicly Funded Research Act. The law requires that research articles created with funds from the California Department of Public Health be made publicly available in an online repository no later than 12 months after publication in a peer-reviewed journal. AB 609 is described as the first state-level law requiring free access to publicly funded research. It is similar to the federal National Institutes of Health Public Access Policy. The bill has been making its way through the California legislature since being introduced by Assemblyman Brian Nestande in February 2013. Nestande’s office announced the passage yesterday.

The law applies to grantees who receive research funds from the Department of Public Health, and those grantees are responsible for ensuring that any publishing or copyright agreements concerning manuscripts submitted to journals fully comply with AB 609. For an article accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal, the grantee must ensure that an electronic version of the peer-reviewed manuscript is available to the department and on an appropriate publicly accessible database approved by the department within 12 months of publication in the journal.

Congratulations to California, the leadership of Assemblyman Nestande, and the coalition of open access supporters who worked hard to make this law a reality.

Spotlight on PLOS ONE’s NeuroMapping and Therapeutics Collection

Collection image.pcol.v02.i17.g001Launched in 2010, the Neuromapping and Therapeutics Collection is a unique collaboration between PLOS ONE and the Society for Brain Mapping and Therapeutics. The Neuromapping and Therapeutics Collection provides a forum for interdisciplinary research aimed at translation of knowledge across a number of fields such as neurosurgery, neurology, psychiatry, radiology, neuroscience, neuroengineering, and healthcare and policy issues that affect the treatment delivery and usage of related devices, drugs, and technologies. The Collection is open to submissions on these topics from any researcher—so far, 24 research papers have been published as part of this Collection.

We spoke to Dr. Allyson Rosen, one of the members of the Society for Brain Mapping and Therapeutics who helps coordinate the Neuromapping and Therapeutics Collection, to discuss the latest news and research in this area, and the new submissions to the collection they’re hoping to see in the next few months:

What’s exciting in Neuromapping and Therapeutics at the moment?

CollectionSBMT-BMF-Logo for blog

 

It is exciting to see how creative scientists and clinicians are at solving important clinical problems by combining diverse techniques in innovative ways. We see our collection as a home for cross-disciplinary work that might not “fit” in traditional journals. For example, we have published MR methods to enable effective brain infusions and work that exploits computer-aided design for cranial reconstructions. There are invasive and non-inva

What are the implications of President Obama’s commitment to Human Brain Mapping research?sive techniques for stimulating selective brain regions and creating focal lesions, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial Doppler technology, and X-ray microplanar beam technology. There are also innovative analysis techniques that exploit powerful computational methods that were previously unavailable.

Given the high-profile nature of the Brain Mapping Initiative and the state of the US economy, we have advocated that there be some clinical implications to the announcement. We believe that this approach will ensure continued public support at a time of great need and uncertainty.

Are there any specific research areas where you’d like to see more submissions to the Collection?

We are proud of the work we’ve received and deeply impressed with the broad array of papers submitted so far. This is a testament to the creativity of our contributors, and we welcome their diversity. We particularly welcome work presented at the international meeting of the Society for Brain Mapping and Therapeutics that occurs in the spring of each year.

Why do you think it’s important to publish this kind of research in an open access journal such as PLOS ONE?

Our society is committed to being inclusive and welcoming any profession that seeks to improve the health and wellbeing of patients with brain disorders. An open access journal enables easier promotion of work we feel is important and encourages sharing among diverse disciplines. Often, truly cutting-edge work is so far ahead of its time that there is not yet an appreciation for its importance. Often, clinical problems are seen as practical but not necessarily novel. We appreciate the mission of PLOS ONE as upholding strong scientific integrity and not as triaging work based on arbitrary decisions regarding importance.

To read more about this Collection, including new research papers like, “Verifying three-dimensional skull model reconstruction using cranial index of symmetryandUnique anti-glioblastoma activities of Hypericin are at the crossroad of biochemical and epigenetic events and culminate in Tumor Cell Differentiation,” click here.

Come visit us at SFN 2013.

Both the Society for Brain Mapping and Therapeutics and PLOS ONE will be attending SFN 2013 – please drop by booth #136 to say hello and learn more about the Collection. For instructions on how to submit to the Collection, please visit the Collection page and download the submission document.

If you have any questions about this Collection, or any other PLOS Collections, please email collections@plos.org

Image credit for Collection cover: Alka Joshi