Agile Knowledge Engineering and Semantic Web (AKSW) — Agile Knowledge Engineering and Semantic Web (AKSW)

“The Research Group Agile Knowledge Engineering and Semantic Web (AKSW) is hosted by the Chair of Business Information Systems (BIS) of the Institute of Computer Science (IfI) / University of Leipzig as well as the Institute for Applied Informatics (InfAI).

Goals

  • Development of methods, tools and applications for adaptive Knowledge Engineering in the context of the Semantic Web
  • Research of underlying Semantic Web technologies and development of fundamental Semantic Web tools and applications
  • Maturation of strategies for fruitfully combining the Social Web paradigms with semantic knowledge representation techniques

AKSW is committed to the free softwareopen sourceopen access and open knowledge movements.”

American Gut: an Open Platform for Citizen Science Microbiome Research | mSystems

“Using standardized protocols from the Earth Microbiome Project and sample contributions from over 10,000 citizen-scientists, together with an open research network, we compare human microbiome specimens primarily from the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia to one another and to environmental samples….We also demonstrate the utility of the living data resource and cross-cohort comparison to confirm existing associations between the microbiome and psychiatric illness and to reveal the extent of microbiome change within one individual during surgery, providing a paradigm for open microbiome research and education….

A unique aspect of the AGP is the open community process of assembling the Research Network and analyzing these data, which are released immediately on data generation. Analysis details are shared through a public forum….”

Frankl: An open science platform

“Frankl is a blockchain platform and tokenised economy to promote, facilitate, and incentivise the practice of open science. The initial focus of Frankl is cognitive assessment – an area of our expertise, and a research domain that faces particular challenges that are amenable to blockchain solutions.

In Phase I, Frankl will develop app-based cognitive assessments that streamline test administration and improve accessibility for children and adults with physical or cognitive disabilities. Apps will interface with blockchain-based data storage, facilitating data sharing for clinical and research purposes while maintaining privacy of individuals via encryption. Access to the Frankl suite of apps will be via micropayments in Frankl tokens.

In Phase II, Frankl will release the source code for the apps, enabling researchers, clinicians, and independent app developers to build their own cognitive assessment apps on the Frankl platform. In this way, Frankl will create a marketplace to incentivise (via Frankl tokens) the development of new and better cognitive assessments, simultaneously promoting open science and disrupting the forecast (by 2021) USD 8 billion global market for cognitive assessment and training.

This whitepaper outlines the technical specifications for the Frankl platform, the practical path to its creation, and exemplar applications including our first use case – a cognitive assessment specifically designed for autistic children. We provide details of the Frankl token economy and participation, and sketch out our long term vision for the development of Frankl as an interface whereby blockchain technologies facilitate the widespread adoption of open science practices. …”

Weaving a Semantic Web across OSS repositories: unleashing a new potential for academia and practice

Abstract:  Several public repositories and archives of “facts” about libre software projects, maintained either by open source communities or by research communities, have been flourishing over the Web in the recent years. These have enable new analysis and support new quality assurance tasks.

This paper presents some complementary existing tools, projects and models proposed both by OSS actors or research initiatives, that are likely to lead to useful future developments in terms of study of the FLOSS phenomenon, and also to the very practitioners in the FLOSS development projects, provided that interoperability is fostered at all places.

A goal of the research conducted within the HELIOS project, is to address bugs traceability issues. For that, we investigate the potential of using Semantic Web technologies in navigating between many different bugtracker systems scattered all over the open source ecosystem.

By using Semantic Web techniques, it is possible to interconnect the databases containing data about open-source software projects development, hence letting OSS partakers identify resources, annotate them, and further interlink them using dedicated properties, collectively designing a distributed semantic graph. Such links expressed with standard Semantic techniques are paving the way to new applications (including ones meant for “end-users”). For instance this may have an impact on the way research efforts are conducted (less fragmented), and could also be used by development communities to improve Quality Assurance tasks.

Weaving a Semantic Web across OSS repositories: unleashing a new potential for academia and practice

Abstract:  Several public repositories and archives of “facts” about libre software projects, maintained either by open source communities or by research communities, have been flourishing over the Web in the recent years. These have enable new analysis and support new quality assurance tasks.

This paper presents some complementary existing tools, projects and models proposed both by OSS actors or research initiatives, that are likely to lead to useful future developments in terms of study of the FLOSS phenomenon, and also to the very practitioners in the FLOSS development projects, provided that interoperability is fostered at all places.

A goal of the research conducted within the HELIOS project, is to address bugs traceability issues. For that, we investigate the potential of using Semantic Web technologies in navigating between many different bugtracker systems scattered all over the open source ecosystem.

By using Semantic Web techniques, it is possible to interconnect the databases containing data about open-source software projects development, hence letting OSS partakers identify resources, annotate them, and further interlink them using dedicated properties, collectively designing a distributed semantic graph. Such links expressed with standard Semantic techniques are paving the way to new applications (including ones meant for “end-users”). For instance this may have an impact on the way research efforts are conducted (less fragmented), and could also be used by development communities to improve Quality Assurance tasks.

Decentralised Authoring, Annotations and Notifications for a Read-Write Web with dokieli

Abstract:  Decentralising the creation, publication, and annotation of hypertext documents provides authors with a technological guarantee for independence of any publication authority. While the Web was designed as a decentralised environment, individual authors still lack the ability to conveniently author and publish documents, and to engage in social interactions with documents of others in a truly decentralised fashion. We present dokieli, a fully decentralised, browser-based authoring and annotation platform with built-in support for social interactions, through which people retain the ownership of and sovereignty over their data. The resulting “living” documents are interoperable and independent of dokieli since they follow standards and best practices, such as HTML+RDFa for a fine-grained semantic structure, Linked Data Platform for personal data storage, and Linked Data Notifications for updates. This article describes dokieli’s architecture and implementation, demonstrating advanced document authoring and interaction without a single point of control. Such an environment provides the right technological conditions for independent publication of scientific articles, news, and other works that benefit from diverse voices and open interactions.

Decentralised Authoring, Annotations and Notifications for a Read-Write Web with dokieli

Abstract:  Decentralising the creation, publication, and annotation of hypertext documents provides authors with a technological guarantee for independence of any publication authority. While the Web was designed as a decentralised environment, individual authors still lack the ability to conveniently author and publish documents, and to engage in social interactions with documents of others in a truly decentralised fashion. We present dokieli, a fully decentralised, browser-based authoring and annotation platform with built-in support for social interactions, through which people retain the ownership of and sovereignty over their data. The resulting “living” documents are interoperable and independent of dokieli since they follow standards and best practices, such as HTML+RDFa for a fine-grained semantic structure, Linked Data Platform for personal data storage, and Linked Data Notifications for updates. This article describes dokieli’s architecture and implementation, demonstrating advanced document authoring and interaction without a single point of control. Such an environment provides the right technological conditions for independent publication of scientific articles, news, and other works that benefit from diverse voices and open interactions.

Linked Research

“Linked Research is an initiative, a movement, and a manifesto. We believe that scholarly communication is stunted by current academic publishing practices, and we aim to promote change for the greater good. This is not something hypothetical or a dream for the future, it is completely possible with today’s technologies. A cultural shift is needed, and Linked Research is here to bring together like-minded people who want to push this forwards.

Linked Research is not biased towards any particular tool or technology; we understand that different researchers and disciplines have different needs and desires around scholarly communication. We encourage the use of any technologies that comply with the Linked Research principles….”

Publish your research in a space you control, on your own terms. You do not need permission to make your work accessible to all….Create unique identifiers for everything you think is important, from data objects to sections of prose, so others can refer to and reuse them….Reuse and link to other research and data so nothing goes to waste or is reinvented. Keep a machine-readable trace of inspirations and derivations….Have an open comments policy so that anyone can review and generate discussion around your work….Reject information silos, paywalls, academic box-ticking, and archaic and artificial barriers. Be the change; publish your research using a free culture license, and openly review the work of others….”