Building the Mathematical Library of the Future | Quanta Magazine

“Every day, dozens of like-minded mathematicians gather on an online forum called Zulip to build what they believe is the future of their field.

They’re all devotees of a software program called Lean. It’s a “proof assistant” that, in principle, can help mathematicians write proofs. But before Lean can do that, mathematicians themselves have to manually input mathematics into the program, translating thousands of years of accumulated knowledge into a form Lean can understand.

To many of the people involved, the virtues of the effort are nearly self-evident….”

https://wiki.lyrasis.org/display/samvera/Samvera+Connect+2020

“Samvera Connect (hashtag #samvera2020) is a chance for the Samvera Community to come together with an emphasis on synchronizing efforts, technical development, plans, and community links. This year, of course, the COVID-19 pandemic has meant that we cannot meet face-to-face; instead we’re putting together an exciting, on-line event that we hope will capture many of the best bits that our in-person conference normally offers.  The meeting program is aimed at existing users, managers and developers and at new folks who may be just “kicking the tires” on Samvera and who want to know more. Samvera advertises this yearly conference with the slogan “as a Samvera Partner or user, if you can only make it to one Samvera meeting this academic year,  this is the one to attend!”  ”

Arcadia Fund Increases Support for our Work

“We’re thrilled to announce that Arcadia, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin, has generously committed to continue its support of our work with a four-year, $1,870,000 grant. Building on the investments we’ve already made in the past couple of years thanks to Arcadia, we’ll use this to double down on our flagship tools such as InstantILL.org and Shareyourpaper.org that make it easier to make papers Open Access and improve researchers’ ability to do their work without expensive subscriptions….”

Why Congress should invest in open-source software

“Although such direct investment is one way to encourage positive, effective outcomes, there are additional cost-effective methods that require less upfront capital outlay. For example, my recent research has shown that changing federal procurement regulations that favor FOSS over proprietary software can have numerous positive spillovers to the private sector, including increases in company productivity, the number of technology startups founded, and the size of the technology-related labor force. This research shows that the passage of such a law in France led to as much as an 18% increase in the founding of French IT-related startups and as much as a 14% increase in the number of French workers employed in IT-related jobs.

While some FOSS contributors are paid by their employer to contribute, most contributions to FOSS are made without direct compensation. Therefore, another option is to provide tax credits to the people who volunteer their free time to help create and maintain FOSS. A bill for such a credit has been introduced in the New York State Assembly every legislative session since 2009 but has never made it out of committee. If passed, this bill would provide a $200 tax credit for expenses related to FOSS development, which would help incentivize more individuals to contribute, likely leading to spillover benefits for the state of New York similar to those from the French procurement regulation….”

Data Science Pull Requests — A Method for Data Science Review & Merging | by Dean Pleban | Sep, 2020 | Towards Data Science

“Today, I’m happy to introduce Data Science Pull Requests (DS PRs) on DAGsHub, which are Pull Requests (PRs), re-imagined for the data science (DS) workflow. This new capability unlocks a standard review process for data science teams, enabling them to merge data across different branches and accept data contributions across forks. This provides a better collaborative experience for teams in data science organizations and enables truly Open Source Data Science (OSDS) projects….”

To Spur Software Re-use in Research, CANARIE Awards up to $3.4M to Research Teams to Evolve their Platforms for Use by Other Researchers | CANARIE

“CANARIE announced today the selection of 13 successful projects from its latest Research Software funding call. This funding will enable research teams to adapt their existing research platforms for re-use by other research teams, including those working in different disciplines. As a result, new research teams from across Canada will be able to re-use previously funded and developed software to accelerate their discoveries.

The research workflow (data acquisition, storage, computation/processing, visualization, and data management) is common across all research disciplines. By adapting purpose-built software developed for this workflow so that other research teams can also benefit from them, the impact of public investments in research is maximized and time to discoveries can be accelerated:

More research funding is allocated to research, rather than to the development of software that already exists
Efficiencies in software development enable researchers to devote their time and resources to the research itself …”

A policy and legal Open Science framework: a proposal

Abstract:  Our proposal of an Open Science definition as a political and legal framework where research outputs are shared and disseminated in order to be rendered visible, accessible, reusable is developed, standing over the concepts enhanced by the Budapest Open Science Initiative (BOAI), and by the Free/Open Source Software (FOSS) and Open data movements. We elaborate this proposal through a detailed analysis of some selected EC policies, laws and the role of research evaluation practices.