African Principles for Open Access in Scholarly Communication – AfricArXiv

“1) Academic Research and knowledge from and about Africa should be freely available to all who wish to access, use or reuse it while at the same time being protected from misuse and misappropriation.

2) African scientists and scientists working on African topics and/or territory will make their research achievements including underlying datasets available in a digital Open Access repository or journal and an explicit Open Access license is applied.

3) African research output should be made available in the principle common language of the global science community as well as in one or more local African languages – at least in summary.

4) It is important to take into consideration in the discussions indigenous and traditional knowledge in its various forms.

5) It is necessary to respect the diverse dynamics of knowledge generation and circulation by discipline and geographical area.

6) It is necessary to recognise, respect and acknowledge the regional diversity of African scientific journals, institutional repositories and academic systems.

7) African Open Access policies and initiatives promote Open Scholarship, Open Source and Open Standards for interoperability purposes.

8) Multi-stakeholder mechanisms for collaboration and cooperation should be established to ensure equal participation across the African continent.

9) Economic investment in Open Access is consistent with its benefit to societies on the African continent – therefore institutions and governments in Africa provide the enabling environment, infrastructure and capacity building required to support Open Access

10) African Open Access stakeholders and actors keep up close dialogues with representatives from all world regions, namely Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Oceania….”

African Principles for Open Access in Scholarly Communication – AfricArXiv

“1) Academic Research and knowledge from and about Africa should be freely available to all who wish to access, use or reuse it while at the same time being protected from misuse and misappropriation.

2) African scientists and scientists working on African topics and/or territory will make their research achievements including underlying datasets available in a digital Open Access repository or journal and an explicit Open Access license is applied.

3) African research output should be made available in the principle common language of the global science community as well as in one or more local African languages – at least in summary.

4) It is important to take into consideration in the discussions indigenous and traditional knowledge in its various forms.

5) It is necessary to respect the diverse dynamics of knowledge generation and circulation by discipline and geographical area.

6) It is necessary to recognise, respect and acknowledge the regional diversity of African scientific journals, institutional repositories and academic systems.

7) African Open Access policies and initiatives promote Open Scholarship, Open Source and Open Standards for interoperability purposes.

8) Multi-stakeholder mechanisms for collaboration and cooperation should be established to ensure equal participation across the African continent.

9) Economic investment in Open Access is consistent with its benefit to societies on the African continent – therefore institutions and governments in Africa provide the enabling environment, infrastructure and capacity building required to support Open Access

10) African Open Access stakeholders and actors keep up close dialogues with representatives from all world regions, namely Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Oceania….”

Open NetSci Hackathon

The Open NetSci Hackathon is an event sponsored by PLOS. It is part of the extended program of the 14th International School and Conference on Network Science (NetSci 2019).

The goal of the Hackathon is to promote open research practice in Network Science. For the first edition, the theme will be open code and data.

We hope to make the hackathon a perfect venue for getting together, and hacking away at fun projects in a laid-back, friendly environment….”

Open Source–It’s in the Genes | Linux Journal

Just as software code can be open source rather than proprietary, so there are publicly funded genomic sequencing initiatives that make their results available to all. One of the largest projects, the UK Biobank(UKB), involves 500,000 participants. Any researcher, anywhere in the world, can download complete, anonymized data sets, provided they are approved by the UKB board. One important restriction is that they must not try to re-identify any participant—something that would be relatively easy to do given the extremely detailed clinical history that was gathered from volunteers along with blood and urine samples. Investigators asked all 500,000 participants about their habits, and examined them for more than 2,000 different traits, including data on their social lives, cognitive state, lifestyle and physical health.

Given the large number of genomes that need to be sequenced, the first open DNA data sets from UKB are only partial, although the plan is to sequence all genomes more fully in due course. These smaller data sets allow what is called “genotyping”, which provides a rough map of a person’s DNA and its specific properties. Even this partial sequencing provides valuable information, especially when it is available for large numbers of people. As an article in Science points out, it is not just the size and richness of the open data sets that makes the UK Biobank unique, it is the thorough-going nature of the sharing that is required from researchers….

It’s the classic “given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow”. By open-sourcing the genomic code of 500,000 of its citizens, the UK is getting the top DNA hackers in the world to find the “bugs”—the variants that are associated with medical conditions—that will help our understanding of them and may well lead to the development of new treatments for them. The advantages are so obvious, it’s a wonder people use anything else. A bit like open source….”

Web annotation tool Hypothesis hits a milestone

The team behind Hypothesis, an open-source software tool that allows people to annotate web pages, announced in March that its users had collectively posted more than 5 million comments across the scholarly web since the tool was launched in 2011. That’s up from about 220,000 total comments in 2015 (see ‘Comment counts’). The company has grown from 26,000 registered users to 215,000 over the same period….”

Open-source Bazaar: Ensuring independent, open infrastructure in the age of acquisitions | Events | eLife

With critical infrastructures like hosting platforms and manuscript submissions systems being acquired by large commercial publishers, smaller and society publishers wonder what other curve balls the future will bring. Will end to end workflow solutions lock them in? Or will such monopolies lock them out from participation? Community-owned infrastructure can be an answer. More and more open source collaborations are maturing and entering the ecosystem.

Other initiatives are emerging as service partners to help small players who lack technical resources or who simply aren’t interested in running a solution themselves. This informational and interactive session seeks to bring community-owned and governed initiatives with those exploring future alternatives to infrastructure consolidation….”

Welcome to the Archives Unleashed Project

“Archives Unleashed aims to make petabytes of historical internet content accessible to scholars and others interested in researching the recent past. Supported by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, we are developing web archive search and data analysis tools to enable scholars, librarians and archivists to access, share, and investigate recent history since the early days of the World Wide Web….”

PubSweet Collaboration Week – May 7 – 13 : Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

About three years ago, we set out to build a framework for building publishing software with components. Take a component here, a component there, make one on your own, and, presto! you have your custom publishing platform! While the framework itself has matured significantly, we’re not there yet in terms of the available components and how they fit together.

At the same time, we started building a community around this framework, organisations and people looking to innovate within this space and looking for a way to do so. While building a community has to happen in parallel with software development, I think that if you’re doing open source development right, your community will be ahead of the software most of the time. This is certainly the case for us. We envisioned a community that openly shares their experiences and solutions and is willing to collaborate on new ideas, despite basically being competitors, and I can happily (and proudly) say that our community has already reached this ideal.

To close the loop and make PubSweet the go-to framework and component library for developing publishing software, we need to take the lessons from the three systems in production right now (Hindawi’s, EBI’s and eLife’s publishing systems) and incorporate them into PubSweet itself, for everyone to use and benefit from. If we could just get the designers and developers of these systems in the same room, get them to talk to each other, share their custom approaches and try to find commonalities between them… wouldn’t that be awesome? Luckily our community is awesome, and well-versed in that sort of thing, and that’s exactly what’s happening in our event this week!

For the inaugural PubSweet Collaboration Week, starting on May 7th, Coko, EBI, eLife and Hindawi are getting together in Cambridge to make more parts of these systems reusable and add them to PubSweet’s component library….”

North Carolina press seeks sustainable open-access model for monographs

The University of North Carolina Press is leading an experiment to significantly lower the cost of producing scholarly books — an important step toward a sustainable open-access publishing model for monographs.

Many university presses have experimented with open-access monographs, but few have transitioned away from charging fees for most work, as they are unable to do so sustainably, said John Sherer, director of UNC Press….

One ambitious OA monograph initiative, Toward an Open Monograph Ecosystem (TOME), offers university presses subsidies of $15,000 per book. Sherer’s project aims to demonstrate that a subsidy of $7,000 could suffice….”

North Carolina press seeks sustainable open-access model for monographs

The University of North Carolina Press is leading an experiment to significantly lower the cost of producing scholarly books — an important step toward a sustainable open-access publishing model for monographs.

Many university presses have experimented with open-access monographs, but few have transitioned away from charging fees for most work, as they are unable to do so sustainably, said John Sherer, director of UNC Press….

One ambitious OA monograph initiative, Toward an Open Monograph Ecosystem (TOME), offers university presses subsidies of $15,000 per book. Sherer’s project aims to demonstrate that a subsidy of $7,000 could suffice….”