A Giant Medieval Puzzle – Library Matters

““Fragmentology” is a new approach to the visual gathering of such dispersed fragments in order to re-assemble the pieces of a codex.  A digital platform is now available to apply collective energy into fitting the pieces of the puzzle back together again, which has an enormous potential for research.  Fragmentarium is the name of a partnership of institutions gathered to develop the technologies needed to build “a common laboratory for fragments” and conduct research.  It promises to yield digital versions from the original fragments, constituted from various holdings. This process will enable provenance research, the study of the circulation of manuscripts, and generate connections among researchers and curators. Thus a leaf holding comparable visual cues may be further investigated as a originating from the same or similar source. …”

Towards open science: what we know and what we need to know

“Open science presents itself as a set of policies and actions to disseminate research results in an accessible, free and reusable and reproducible way through public digital repositories. As a movement, it uses three basic elements: open access to publications; data opening (whether raw, models, specifications, or documentation); computational process opening (software and algorithms)(1).

Although it is not a new phenomenon, the term can still cause strangeness even to experienced researchers. Open access to articles, as the first element, encountered (and still finds) great resistance to becoming unanimous, although pressure from the scientific society and funding agencies has accelerated the progress of this stage. On the other hand, data opening seems to have been better received, at least in its interface related to the deposit of scientific manuscripts in the preprint format, however this is only the beginning.

Concerning the Brazilian experience, SciELO and the Brazilian Institute of Information in Science and Technology (IBICT – Instituto Brasileiro de Informação em Ciência e Tecnologia) have been leading the opening process and for some time have designed guidelines and strategies to guide their journals towards open science: TOP (Transparency and Openness Promotion)(2). This system interestingly presents levels of openness experimentation that range from pointing out what is a certain item to making it conditional on it being expressly fulfilled for the manuscript to be published.

Although it has existed since 2017, it was only in 2020 that the alignment of Brazilian journals to TOP was indeed accelerated, and significant changes will be adopted in the journals in the coming months and years to adapt to such principles.

Having this information and basing ourselves on the fact that historically changes have been the target of resistance, especially when they happen in an ancient system, like the scientific publication system, we use our privilege to take on multiple roles (author, reviewer, and editor) among the scientific publication process in Brazilian journals to reflect and point out in this editorial four central issues related to editorial management that should be recurrent among the actors involved in the publication process in the coming years months: …”

Pilot Program Offers NYU Students and Faculty Instant Access to 150,000 Ebooks Via App

“NYU Libraries and ProQuest have launched a pilot project that will make over 150,000 scholarly titles available to students and faculty via their mobile devices. NYU users can access coursebooks, ebooks, and reference works from major publishers through an e-reader app called SimplyE….”

Collaborating with our community to increase code sharing

“Given how essential newly developed code can be to computational biology research we have been collaborating with the Editorial Board of PLOS Computational Biology and consulting with computational biology researchers to develop a new more-rigorous code policy that is intended to increase code sharing on publication of articles….”

The Open Library Foundation Names New Board President and Two New Board Members

“The Open Library Foundation, which enables the development, accessibility and sustainability of open source projects for and by libraries, is making changes to its Board. 

Tom Cramer, the Associate University Librarian and Director of Digital Library Systems and Services at Stanford University will replace David Carlson as Board President. Carlson, Dean of Libraries at Texas A&M University, will maintain his seat on the Board. The Board is also welcoming Chris Keene and Paula Sullenger. …”

Open Source is Everywhere, but So Is Fake Open Source | Hacker Noon

“Tristan Louis gives weight to new term that I like a lot: fauxpen. Faux in French means “false” or “fake”. So fauxpen means fake open. There has always been a lot of that going around, but since the world of tech inevitably contains more of everything, there’s more fauxpen stuff than ever….”

Open-Source Tools for Chemistry Workshops Tickets, Multiple Dates | Eventbrite

“All scientists working in chemistry need software tools for accessing, handling and storing chemical information, or performing molecular modelling and computational chemistry. There is now a wealth of open-source tools to help in these activities; however, many are not as well-known as commercial offerings. These workshops offer a unique opportunity for attendees to try out a range of open-source software packages for themselves with expert tuition in different aspects of chemistry. Information is provided for attendees to install the packages to run on their own laptops.

There are four two-hour sessions in this series which will be run on Zoom….”

Data preparation for artificial intelligence in medical imaging: A comprehensive guide to open-access platforms and tools – Physica Medica: European Journal of Medical Physics

“Highlights

Image pre-processing tools are critical to develop and assess AI solutions.
Open access tools and data are widely available for medical image preparation.
AI needs Big Data to develop and fine-tune a model properly.
Big Data needs AI to fully interpret the decision making process….”

 

Open Editors

“Open Editors collects publicly available information about the editors and editorial boards of scholarly journals through a technique called webscraping, whereby a script accesses the websites of the publishers to extract the relevant information. The codes (programmed in R) are available at GitHub….”

Open Editors: A Dataset of Scholarly Journals’ Editorial Board Positions

Abstract:  Editormetrics analyse the role of editors of academic journals and their impact on the scientific publication system. However, such analyses would best rely on open, structured and machine-readable data on editors and editorial boards, whose availability still remains rare. To address this shortcoming, the project Open Editors collects data about academic journal editors on a large scale and structures them into a single dataset. It does so by scraping the websites of 6.090 journals from 17 publishers, thereby structuring publicly available information (names, affiliations, editorial roles etc.) about 478.563 researchers. The project will iterate this webscraping procedure annually to enable insights into the changes of editorial boards over time. All codes and data are made available at GitHub, while the result is browsable at a dedicated website (https://openeditors.ooir.org). This dataset carries wide-ranging implications for meta-scientific investigations into the landscape of scholarly publications, including for bibliometric analyses, and allows for critical inquiries into the representation of diversity and inclusivity. It also contributes to the goal of expanding linked open data within science to evaluate and reflect on the scholarly publication process.