Frontiers | Opportunities in Open Science With AI | Big Data

“This article examines the current trends and elaborates the future potentials of AI in its role for making science more open and accessible. Based on the experience derived from a research project called Microsoft Academic, the advocates have reasons to be optimistic about the future of open science as the advanced discovery, ranking, and distribution technologies enabled by AI are offering strong incentives for scientists, funders and research managers to make research articles, data and software freely available and accessible….”

TU Delft Strategic Plan Open Science 2020-2024 | TU Delft Repositories

Abstract:  Open Science is creating new forms of scientific interaction that were impossible or undreamed of in an earlier age. This has a strong impact on core academic processes like research, education and innovation. It is, for instance, easier to replicate an experiment if the relevant data sets are digitally available to any scientist who wishes to corroborate her colleague’s findings.TU Delft has a long history of engagement with Open Science. Yet, with its Open Science Programme 2020-2024, Research and Education in the Open Era, TU Delft wishes to take Open Science to the next level: a situation in which Open Science has become the default way of practising research and education, and the “information era” has become the “open era”. It is TU Delft’s ambition to be frontrunner in this revolutionary process. This is reflected in the TU Delft Strategic Framework 2018-2024, with “openness” as one of its major principles.The TU Delft Open Science Programme 2020-2024 tackles all areas of scholarly engagement where restrictions limit the flow of academic knowledge. It proposes new approaches to the process of research, education and innovation, with a strong focus on transparency, integrity and efficiency.The programme consists of five interrelated projects: Open Education, Open Access, Open Publishing Platform, FAIR Data, and FAIR Software. The projects are aimed at creating and disseminating various types of resources for the benefit of TU Delft researchers, teachers and students, as well as the general public. They will range from educational materials and software to a publishing platform. All outputs of the programme will be as ‘FAIR’ as possible: findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable.

Towards FAIR principles for research software | Data Science

Abstract:  The FAIR Guiding Principles, published in 2016, aim to improve the findability, accessibility, interoperability and reusability of digital research objects for both humans and machines. Until now the FAIR principles have been mostly applied to research data. The ideas behind these principles are, however, also directly relevant to research software. Hence there is a distinct need to explore how the FAIR principles can be applied to software. In this work, we aim to summarize the current status of the debate around FAIR and software, as a basis for the development of definite community-agreed principles for FAIR research software in the future. We discuss what makes software different from data with respect to the application of the FAIR principles, present an analysis of where the existing principles can directly be applied to software, where they need to be adapted or reinterpreted, and where the definition of additional principles is required. Furthermore, we discuss desired characteristics of research software that go beyond FAIR.

 

Make code accessible with these cloud services

“Scientific software often requires installing, navigating and troubleshooting a byzantine network of computational ‘dependencies’ — the code libraries and tools on which each software module relies. Some have to be compiled from source code or configured just so, and an installation that should take a few minutes can degenerate into a frustrating online odyssey through websites such as Stack Overflow and GitHub. “One of the hardest parts of reproducibility is getting your computer set up in exactly the same way as somebody else’s computer is set up. That is just ridiculously difficult,” says Kirstie Whitaker, a neuroscientist at the Alan Turing Institute in London….”

The spirit of openness in Belgrade during the Open Access Week: Conference The Application of Free Software and Open Hardware – OpenAIRE Blog

“The second conference The Application of Free Software and Open Hardware (Primena slobodnog softvera i otvorenog hardvera – PSSOH) was certainly the most vibrant event organized in Serbia on the occasion of the 2019 Open Access Week.”

Guest Post – A Look at the User-Centric Future of Academic Research Software — And Why It Matters, Part 1: Trends – The Scholarly Kitchen

“Researchers are now able to create viable products and services in a highly decentralized fashion, which means it is increasingly likely that there will be a gap between the software landscape that publishers and other stakeholders currently envision, and the one that will soon exist.  As researchers become more tech-savvy, many are developing products for themselves and leveraging commercial, yet open source, technologies to create modern platforms and services that not only fit their needs, but are easy to use; this is a bellwether for the tools researchers and publishers are likely to see on the horizon….”

An Open Source License That Requires Users to Do No Harm | WIRED

“Coraline Ada Ehmke wants to give her fellow developers more control over how their software is used. Software released under her new “Hippocratic License” can be shared and modified for almost any purpose, with one big exception: “Individuals, corporations, governments, or other groups for systems or activities that actively and knowingly endanger, harm, or otherwise threaten the physical, mental, economic, or general well-being of individuals or groups in violation of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights.” …”

 

An Open Source License That Requires Users to Do No Harm | WIRED

“Coraline Ada Ehmke wants to give her fellow developers more control over how their software is used. Software released under her new “Hippocratic License” can be shared and modified for almost any purpose, with one big exception: “Individuals, corporations, governments, or other groups for systems or activities that actively and knowingly endanger, harm, or otherwise threaten the physical, mental, economic, or general well-being of individuals or groups in violation of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights.” …”

 

Plan S, Core Open Access Publishing Standards & Scholastica

Scholastica has released a Product Roadmap detailing new features to help journals comply with Plan S and sustainably meet core publishing standards. The roadmap page also includes answers to Plan S FAQs and a resources section to help publishers stay caught up on Plan S developments and work through the implementation guidelines.