Following up with our Open Science Stars – ScienceOpen Blog

“Four years ago, the late Jon Tennant, who was a significant contributor to the Open Science movement and a friend and colleague to the ScienceOpen team, interviewed people on ScienceOpen’s behalf from around the world who were active supporters of making science more open. This year, we got back in touch with several of the interviewees to get their opinion on the current status of Open Science in 2020. We heard from Dr. Joanne Kamens, Executive Director of Addgene, Professor Dr. Samir Hachani at Algiers II University, and Dr. Chris Hartgerink, Executive Director of Liberate Science GmbH. We also received an interesting update on the state of Open Science in Indoensia from Dr. Dasapta Erwin Irawan. Where do you think Open Science is heading in 2020? Share your thoughts with us! Here are our Open Science Stars’ responses:  …”

Peter Suber on Open Access News | Archivalia

“OATP isn’t my main job by a long shot. But my main job requires me to stay on top of what’s happening in the world of OA, which is fortuitous for OATP. My approach is to read all that I can, for my job, and then share what I read or learn by tagging it for OATP….

Some taggers systematically search for new developments in areas that matter to them, such as OA in their country, OA in their field, or OA on a certain subtopic such as OA policies, OA journals, OA repositories, OA books, open data, OER, or copyright. Others simply tag what they encounter, without taking special pains to encounter more than they already do. I welcome both kinds. As they join the project, in enough fields and countries, bringing their different interests and perspectives with them, OATP becomes more and more inclusive….”

A Warm Welcome for ORCID’s New Executive Director, Chris Shillum | ORCID

“JP: How do you see open scholarly infrastructure developing in the next few years?

CS: There are a number of fairly well-established open scholarly infrastructure organizations such as Crossref, ORCID, and DataCite, and we definitely need to look at how we can work more effectively together to deliver what I might call joined-up capabilities and joined-up experiences to our mutual users and members. So I think that’s one thing I’d like to see developed. But there are also lots of gaps.

We know that there’s huge interest in enabling scholars to represent their work in ways that are challenging because there still aren’t identifiers for every kind of research output, and there aren’t good taxonomies of every kind of contribution that research has made. I don’t necessarily think it’s ORCID’s role to take all of that on, but we can work with our fellow scholarly infrastructure initiatives to lay the path for other groups to come along and benefit from our collective experience. …

So I was involved in a set of very early discussions which led to the RA21 recommendations, and then in turn to SeamlessAccess, which is all about applying modern authentication technology to ease the problems researchers face with access to resources that their institutions have provided for them. This has a close tie-in with ORCID and CrossRef because it’s ultimately about getting some of these barriers out of the way so researchers can focus on doing the research without having to struggle with systems that aren’t joined up properly. Most recently, I’ve been working on an initiative called GetFTR which is about improving the user journey between all manner of tools and content discovery systems and authoritative published content. 

I guess some people might say that these problems will diminish with the move to Open Access, but if you look at SeamlessAccess, it’s about improving access to many kinds of resources that researchers need and their institutions have to vouch that they should have access to, like shared research infrastructure and research collaboration tools. We know from researchers themselves that they really appreciate a lot less hassle dealing with usernames and passwords and access control, for all kinds of resources. So that’s really what SeamlessAccess is all about. It’s not done yet, but we’ve made some good progress in starting to solve that problem and make it easier….

But I think the most difficult and most satisfying milestone which kind of coincided with when I left the Board was when ORCID finally got to sustainability and financial break-even. The most challenging thing over the past decade has been finding a model that enabled us to provide a vast majority of ORCID services freely and openly, yet with enough support to sustain the organization. It’s so easy to underestimate just how difficult that is in the world of open infrastructure, and it was a great achievement for everyone—for the team, for founding Executive Director Laure Haak, and the Board to eventually get to that point after almost 10 years….”

Publisher Lawsuit Against Internet Archive Puts Future of Book Ownership In Question | WDET

“The newly-launched library serviced a temporary collection of books — about 4 million in total, many in the public domain — with a targeted focus of supporting remote teaching, research activities and independent scholarship. For this service, students paid nothing. 

This Open Library is now at the center of a lawsuit filed by major publishing corporations, including HarperCollins, Hatchett, Wiley and Random House, against the Internet Archives, a nonprofit website, alleging that the Open Library concept is a “mass copyright infringement.”

The lawsuit is scheduled for a federal court trial in 2021.  The publishers are seeking to have the Open Library permanently shut down….

In an op-ed written for The Nation, journalist and new media pioneer Maria Bustillos took a critical look at the lawsuit, the concept of an open library and what ownership means when major publishers seek to change what it means to own a book….”

An interview with Arianna Becerril-García, Executive Director, Redalyc | Zenodo

“This is one of a series of interviews to share insights into the sustainability of open infrastructure services.

These interviews were conducted in the Spring/Summer of 2020. This is an Invest in Open Infrastructure Project: https://investinopen.org.

This work is supported by Open Society Foundations and SPARC Europe, in collaboration with Invest in Open Infrastructure….”

Meet our Open Science Champions! « LIS Research Support |

“During the Open Access Week (19-25 October), every day an Open Science Champion will be nominated by LIS Research Support.

Normally, LIS Research Support and the Open Science Community would have organized various events on open science and open access during the Open Access Week, but the current Covid-19 situation makes this impossible. Nonetheless we decided that it is now even more important to create awareness for open science and to acknowledge all the good work done by various TiU researchers in this respect. Open and accessible science, publishing and education is even more a necessity these days when universities and libraries are closed or almost unreachable for many. Therefore the most active and creative open science frontrunners of 2020 will be put in the limelight and will be rewarded with the title Open Science Champion 2020.

If you want to get to know our Open Science Champions, keep an eye on the Twitter account of the Open Science Community Tilburg, @OpenTilburg.”

Scholarly Communication: An Interview With Joerg Heber Of PLOS New Books Network podcast

“Open Access is spelled with a capital O and a capital A at the Public Library of Science (or PLOS, for short), a nonprofit Open Access publisher. Among PLOS’s suite of journals, PLOS One is the nonprofit’s largest in number of articles published and its broadest in coverage, ranging as it does over all topics in the natural sciences and medicine, to include, as well, some in the social sciences, too. PLOS One appears only online, a format the staff bring into service to foster Open Access Science, whether they do this through initiatives for Open Citations and Open Abstracts, or through Transparent Peer Review, or also through PLOS One’s newest endeavor, registered reports.

Since its inception in 2006, PLOS One has been at the forefront of Open Access publishing. And today, against the trend to equate Impact Factors with journal names, PLOS One does not promote their own Impact Factor because the measure has been shown to be, at best, only an approximate indicator of research significance. However, in true PLOS fashion, PLOS One offers an alternative in various Article-Level Metrics. These ALMs (as the abbreviation goes) make a closer, tighter fit between value of research and quantifiable measures.

Joerg Heber is Editor-in-Chief of PLOS One. When you track Joerg Heber’s career in publishing, you get the sense of a clear mission: (1) provide access to good science and (2) make providing that access not only viable, but enviable….”

Controlled Digital Lending Visionary Michelle Wu to Receive Internet Archive Hero Award – Internet Archive Blogs

“At today’s Library Leaders Forum, Internet Archive founder and digital librarian Brewster Kahle announced that Michelle Wu will receive the 2020 Internet Archive Hero Award.  The annual award recognizes those who have exhibited leadership in making information available for digital learners all over the world….”

Resources — Open Research Funders Group

“PROFILES IN OPEN

How do researchers who have made their work openly available as a condition of their grant funding feel about their experiences?  What advice would they give to their peers, and to philanthropic organizations considering the adoption of open policies?  “Profiles in Open” present real world stories of open in action, as told by the researchers themselves….

For Mendeley Data winner, sharing FAIR data helps researchers learn from each other

“Vanessa, a Research Fellow in the Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery at the University of Pisa, is a recent winner of the Mendeley Data FAIRest Datasets Award. The award recognizes researchers or research groups that make their research data available for additional research and do so in a way that exemplifies the FAIR Data Principles – Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable….”