Ginsparg, Ph.D. ’81, arXiv founder, receives physics award | Cornell Chronicle

“Paul Ginsparg, Ph.D. ’81, professor of physics and of information science and founder of arXiv, has been named the recipient of the American Institute of Physics 2020 Karl Taylor Compton Medal for Leadership in Physics.

Named after prominent physicist Karl Taylor Compton, the medal is presented every four years to a distinguished physicist. Ginsparg was cited by the selection committee “for his paradigm-changing contributions to physics information sharing by inventing, developing and managing the arXiv system for electronic distribution of pre-publication (or preprint) papers.” …

ArXiv remains the largest manuscript repository of its type. It surpassed 1 million submissions in 2014, and its submission rate has increased by 40% in the past three years.”

Ginsparg, Ph.D. ’81, arXiv founder, receives physics award | Cornell Chronicle

“Paul Ginsparg, Ph.D. ’81, professor of physics and of information science and founder of arXiv, has been named the recipient of the American Institute of Physics 2020 Karl Taylor Compton Medal for Leadership in Physics.

Named after prominent physicist Karl Taylor Compton, the medal is presented every four years to a distinguished physicist. Ginsparg was cited by the selection committee “for his paradigm-changing contributions to physics information sharing by inventing, developing and managing the arXiv system for electronic distribution of pre-publication (or preprint) papers.” …

ArXiv remains the largest manuscript repository of its type. It surpassed 1 million submissions in 2014, and its submission rate has increased by 40% in the past three years.”

Academic Publishers Get Their Wish: DOJ Investigating Sci-Hub Founder For Alleged Ties To Russian Intelligence | Techdirt

“We’ve written plenty about Sci-Hub over the years. The service, which was set up to allow free and easy access to academic research that is all-to-often hidden behind insanely expensive paywalls (often, despite being paid for with public funds), is the bane of academic publishers, though the hero to many academics. As we’ve highlighted, the big publishers keep playing whac-a-mole with the service as they try to take it down around the globe, and each time it just seems to get the site more attention. From the earliest days, it’s been clear that Sci-Hub works by getting academics with access to various collections to “donate” their login credentials, so that Sci-Hub can fetch any missing papers not in its collection (if it, and its associated site Libgen, already have it, they make that version available)….”

Justice Department investigates Sci-Hub founder on suspicion of working for Russian intelligence – The Washington Post

“The Justice Department is investigating a woman who runs a major Internet piracy operation on suspicion that she may also be working with Russian intelligence to steal U.S. military secrets from defense contractors, according to people familiar with the matter.

Alexandra Elbakyan?, a computer programmer born in Kazakhstan, is the creator of Sci-Hub, a website that provides free access to academic papers that are usually available only through expensive subscriptions. Elbakyan’s supporters have favorably described her as a “Robin Hood of science.”

It’s unclear whether Elbakyan is using Sci-Hub’s operations in service of Russian intelligence, but her critics say she has demonstrated significant hacking skills by collecting log-in credentials from journal subscribers, particularly at universities, and using them to pilfer vast amounts of academic literature….”

An Interview with Hal Plotkin on Evolving OER from an Idea to a Movement and Beyond – Michelson 20MM Foundation

“Hal Plotkin is a writer, journalist and activist. He served as the Senior Policy Advisor in the Office of the Under Secretary of Education during  the Obama Administration. Previously, Plotkin served on the Board of Trustees at the Foothill-De Anza Community College District, based in California’s Silicon Valley, where in 2003, he initiated the first official college governance policy in the United States requiring administrative support for the use of public domain learning materials, which later became known as open educational resources. From 2014 to 2017, Plotkin served as the Senior Open Policy Fellow at Creative Commons USA. He is currently a consultant to the national College Promise Campaign, based in Washington, D.C.,  and a consulting scholar at Fondation Maison des Sciences de l’homme, based in Paris, where he helps design and implement efforts to expand access to post-secondary education. …”

Insights into the Economy of Open Scholarship: A look into OpenEdition with Pierre Mounier, deputy director

“OpenEdition is supported financially by the four founding institutions (CNRS [French National Centre for Scientific Research], Aix-Marseille University, EHESS [School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences], Avignon University), which provide the platform with staff, infrastructure and funds to cover operating costs. They also receive support directly from the Ministry of Research (as a research infrastructure). About 50 FTE staff are permanently seconded from the four founding institutions. The staff are divided into an editorial department that manages the relationships with the content producers (blogging researchers, publishers, journal editors), an IT department that runs systems and development, a department for international development and a department dedicated to the Freemium services – ‘Freemium’ being a pricing strategy by which a digital product or service is provided free of charge, but money is charged for additional features. The other main source of revenue stems from project funding – national, regional and European. These funds are used to develop new and innovative tools and services. Recently, OpenEdition has added the Freemium model (ji.sc/2Vxjge3) to their revenue streams, but this system has not been introduced to cover operating costs or infrastructures. Rather, it serves to help the journal publishers and editors to cover their publishing and editing costs. Two-thirds of the money collected is transferred to the publishers OpenEdition works with, while the remaining third is retained to operate the commercial services that sell these Freemium services….”

2019 Scholarly Communications Research Grant Recipients Announced – ACRL Insider

“ACRL is pleased to announce the recipients of its Scholarly Communications Research Grants in 2019. These grants of up to $5,000 each support new research that will contribute to more inclusive systems of scholarly communications in areas suggested by the 2019 report Open and Equitable Scholarly Communications: Creating a More Inclusive Future (available for download or purchase).

The selection committee from ACRL’s Research and Scholarly Environment Committee chose seven proposals from a highly competitive round of applications. The grant recipients are:

Tatiana Bryant (Adelphi University) and Camille Thomas (Florida State University) for a project titled “Attitudes Towards Open Access Publishing Amongst Faculty of Color”
Jennifer Chan (University of California, Los Angeles) and Juleah Swanson (University of Colorado Boulder) for a project titled “SCORE Analysis: Leveraging Institutional Data to Bring Balance Back into the Scholarly Landscape”
Amanda Makula and Laura Turner (University of San Diego) for a project titled “Collaborative Collection Development: Inviting Community-Owned Public Scholarship into the Academic Library”
Gemmicka Piper (Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis) for a project titled “Barriers to Minority Faculty Open Knowledge Production”
Mantra Roy (San Jose State University) for a project titled “Global South Speaks: A Librarianship Perspective”
Teresa Schultz and Elena Azadbakht (University of Nevada, Reno) for a project titled “Accessible Open Educational Resources Project”
Carolyn Sheffield, Michelle Flinchbaugh (University of Maryland, Baltimore County), Carolyn Cox (University of Baltimore), Adam Zukowski (Towson University), Robin Sinn, Caitlin Carter (Johns Hopkins University), Katherine Pitcher (St. Mary’s College), Trevor Muñoz, and Terry Owens (University of Maryland, College Park) for a project titled “A Roadmap to the Future of Promotion & Tenure”…”

Historians Respond to Plan S: Open Access vs OA Policies Redux – The Scholarly Kitchen

“For years, humanists have been pointing to the multi-dimensional importance of openness and accessibility of scholarship, and the multi-dimensional costs of rigid open access (OA) policies. In late October, the Royal Historical Historical Society (RHS) released a “guidance paper” on “Plan S and the History Journal Landscape.” Authored by RHS president Margot Finn, a distinguished professor at University College London (UCL) and a prolific scholar, this follows the RHS’s April 2019 working paper on Plan S and researchers in history of medicine, and June 2019 paper, responding to Plan S, as well as the society’s long-standing engagement with OA policies, and guidance to researchers, particularly in regards to OA policies vis à vis the Research Excellence Framework (REF). It is relevant that the RHS has supported OA initiatives, including their monograph series, “New Historical Perspectives.”  

The new report brings together important evidence about the state of journals that UK historians are publishing in terms of Plan S compliance, and a survey of journal editors. From public data on publications and publishing (including from the 2014 REF), as well as a survey of more than 100 journal editors from 26 UK and international presses, the report concludes that “unless major shifts occur…in the next few months, it is unlikely that either UKRI or Wellcome Trust-funded History researchers will be able to identify sufficient high-quality journal outlets that  comply with full-scale implementation of Plan S.” The report offers perspectives in discreet chapters on “Plan S:  What Do We Know?” and “Plan S:  What Don’t We Know?” An overview of “Research and Journal Publication in History” is followed by an overview of “Open Access History Journals, DOAJ and Plan S” and then coverage of the RHS survey results, and potential routes to Plan S compliance….”

Kumsal Bayazit, Elsevier CEO, shares her vision for building a better future in research

“You [librarians] are helping researchers and institutional leaders preserve and showcase their intellectual outputs. For example, you are establishing and populating Institutional Repositories to capture data-sets, theses, dissertations, conference presentations [note, doesn’t mention articles]. I learned that across more than 500 Digital Commons repositories, we estimate that 94% of the content and 91% of the downloads are for materials other than previously published, peer-reviewed journal articles that libraries have collected and shared openly to deliver on their institution’s mission….

You are promoting and enabling open access in its many forms, including by funding repositories and Article Publication Charges; and by creating your own journals and university presses….

First and foremost, I want to be very clear: Elsevier fully supports open access….

No one can dispute the beauty of the vision of freely-accessible, immediately-available research content, whether peer-reviewed published articles or other scholarly work. I am a UC Berkeley alumna, so these kinds of values were installed in me as a fresh new undergraduate. As Elsevier’s CEO, I am committed to working with you and the rest of the global research community towards a more fully open access future.

In fact, my professional background is in applying technology to content to help professionals make better decisions. For example, working in the part of RELX that serves legal professionals, I’ve seen the powerful benefits of analytical services that are built on top of freely available content, such as case law. This is why I’m excited by the potential to create value for researchers by applying text-mining and artificial intelligence technologies to the entire corpus of peer-reviewed content. I understand and appreciate the role that open access can play in delivering that vision.

 

The question is not whether open access is desirable or beneficial — the question is how we get there….

I am a pragmatist, and I commit to working pragmatically with libraries and other stakeholders to achieve shared open access goals. Part of this means acknowledging obstacles where they exist and discussing them openly and objectively so that we can find solutions to overcome them….”