CC Names Cable Green as Interim CEO

Creative Commons is delighted to welcome Cable Green as the organization’s interim Chief Executive Officer. As we recently announced, Ryan Merkley has stepped down after five years of service as CEO to start a new position at Wikimedia. We are thankful to Ryan for his leadership at CC and excited for him and the Commons that he will continue as a leader in the open knowledge community.

Cable Green (Photo by Sebastiaan ter Burg, CC BY)

Interim CEO Cable Green has been a key member of the Creative Commons staff for the past eight and a half years. As CC’s Director of Open Education, he has been one of the world’s most effective advocates for open licensing policies, and has worked extensively with the global open education community to improve access to effective open educational resources. Cable will continue to spearhead our efforts to advance open education as he takes on this new interim leadership role at CC.

The rest of the Creative Commons board of directors and I are very grateful to Cable for stepping into this new role. He is the perfect person to lead CC during this crucial transition period. He knows and understands the organization, the community, and the important work we do better than anyone. We couldn’t be more confident in him and the rest of the CC staff.

We are also excited to announce that we have launched a CEO search process to identify our next permanent CEO. This process will include outreach to the global Creative Commons community for insights about the future of CC and its leadership.

The Commons is ever-changing and resilient. It is my great honor to cultivate it along with Creative Commons staff, our global network, and supporters.

Share alike, friends!

Molly Van Houweling Creative Commons Board Chair

The post CC Names Cable Green as Interim CEO appeared first on Creative Commons.

CC Names Cable Green as Interim CEO

Creative Commons is delighted to welcome Cable Green as the organization’s interim Chief Executive Officer. As we recently announced, Ryan Merkley has stepped down after five years of service as CEO to start a new position at Wikimedia. We are thankful to Ryan for his leadership at CC and excited for him and the Commons that he will continue as a leader in the open knowledge community.

Cable Green (Photo by Sebastiaan ter Burg, CC BY)

Interim CEO Cable Green has been a key member of the Creative Commons staff for the past eight and a half years. As CC’s Director of Open Education, he has been one of the world’s most effective advocates for open licensing policies, and has worked extensively with the global open education community to improve access to effective open educational resources. Cable will continue to spearhead our efforts to advance open education as he takes on this new interim leadership role at CC.

The rest of the Creative Commons board of directors and I are very grateful to Cable for stepping into this new role. He is the perfect person to lead CC during this crucial transition period. He knows and understands the organization, the community, and the important work we do better than anyone. We couldn’t be more confident in him and the rest of the CC staff.

We are also excited to announce that we have launched a CEO search process to identify our next permanent CEO. This process will include outreach to the global Creative Commons community for insights about the future of CC and its leadership.

The Commons is ever-changing and resilient. It is my great honor to cultivate it along with Creative Commons staff, our global network, and supporters.

Share alike, friends!

Molly Van Houweling Creative Commons Board Chair

The post CC Names Cable Green as Interim CEO appeared first on Creative Commons.

Springer Nature Announces CEO Succession: Frank Vrancken Peeters appointed Chief Executive Officer. Daniel Ropers to step down. | Group | Springer Nature

“Frank Vrancken Peeters joined Springer Nature in September 2017 as a member of the Management Board in a newly created Chief Commercial Officer role. He has spent more than twenty years in general management, innovation, product management and sales roles across the academic, educational and professional publishing sectors.  This followed a successful career in management consulting.

At Springer Nature, Frank was a key contributor to the strategic view on open access migration and took, and will continue to take, a leading role in the Projekt Deal negotiations in Germany.  …”

Dr. Donald Lindberg, 85, Dies; Opened Medical Research to the World – The New York Times

“Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg, who as director of the National Library of Medicine — the world’s largest — computerized its vast holdings and made them accessible to researchers around the world, died on Aug. 17 at a hospital in Bethesda, Md. He was 85….

Dr. Lindberg was a leader in medical informatics, the science of using computer technology to improve human health and the delivery of health care services. As the longtime leader of the library, which is part of the National Institutes of Health, he modernized, expanded and transformed a trove of material, some of which dates to the 12th century.

“He changed fundamentally the way biomedical knowledge and health information is collected, organized, and made available for public use — in small villages in Alaska and Mali as well as in laboratories of Nobel prizewinners,” the library’s board of regents said in a resolution when he retired in 2015….”

Dr. Donald Lindberg, 85, Dies; Opened Medical Research to the World – The New York Times

“Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg, who as director of the National Library of Medicine — the world’s largest — computerized its vast holdings and made them accessible to researchers around the world, died on Aug. 17 at a hospital in Bethesda, Md. He was 85….

Dr. Lindberg was a leader in medical informatics, the science of using computer technology to improve human health and the delivery of health care services. As the longtime leader of the library, which is part of the National Institutes of Health, he modernized, expanded and transformed a trove of material, some of which dates to the 12th century.

“He changed fundamentally the way biomedical knowledge and health information is collected, organized, and made available for public use — in small villages in Alaska and Mali as well as in laboratories of Nobel prizewinners,” the library’s board of regents said in a resolution when he retired in 2015….”

Dr. Donald Lindberg, 85, Dies; Opened Medical Research to the World – The New York Times

“Dr. Donald A.B. Lindberg, who as director of the National Library of Medicine — the world’s largest — computerized its vast holdings and made them accessible to researchers around the world, died on Aug. 17 at a hospital in Bethesda, Md. He was 85….

Dr. Lindberg was a leader in medical informatics, the science of using computer technology to improve human health and the delivery of health care services. As the longtime leader of the library, which is part of the National Institutes of Health, he modernized, expanded and transformed a trove of material, some of which dates to the 12th century.

“He changed fundamentally the way biomedical knowledge and health information is collected, organized, and made available for public use — in small villages in Alaska and Mali as well as in laboratories of Nobel prizewinners,” the library’s board of regents said in a resolution when he retired in 2015….”

European Commission’s Open Access Envoy Joins the cOAlition S Executive Steering Group | Plan S

“Jean-Claude Burgelman, the newly appointed Open Access Envoy at the European Commission, has been officially nominated to the cOAlition S Executive Steering Group (ESG).

Mr Burgelman’s appointment to the ESG will help ensure the European Commission’s commitment to delivering on the ambitions of Plan S over the coming months and ensure their representation in all cOAlition S matters….”

cOAlition S Appoints Johan Rooryck as Open Access Champion | Plan S

“cOAlition S is pleased to announce that Johan Rooryck, Professor of French Linguistics at Leiden University, has been appointed as its Open Access Champion. This role has been created to help present, promote, and develop Plan S as the initiative moves towards implementation.

In his role as Open Access Champion, Rooryck will represent cOAlition S in meetings with external stakeholders including funders, researchers, librarians, and publishers. He will present Plan S, listen to concerns, and develop plans to help participants adapt to a changing publishing landscape. He will also advise cOAlition S on the ways to implement the transition to full and immediate Open Access as smoothly as possible….”

Open and Shut?: The Open Access Interviews: Edith Hall

“Why is open access so contentious? In large part, I think, because although OA began as a bottom-up revolution it was never widely embraced by researchers. However, OA advocates managed to persuade governments, funders and institutions that their colleagues should be compelled to embrace open access. This has seen a series of ever more stringent OA mandates being imposed on researchers, increasing the bureaucratic burden on them (amongst other things).

Monographs are a particularly contested area because of their length, their narrative form, and the licensing issues that this raises.

 

It has not helped that OA advocates promised open access would reduce the costs of scholarly communication. In reality, costs have risen.

 

This last point is particularly troublesome in the UK context as OA policies have been introduced without providing the necessary funding to support them. As a result, researchers can discover that they have been mandated to make their work open access but cannot afford to pay the article-processing charge (APC) needed if they want to satisfy the government’s preference for gold OA.

 

This has been a challenge even for researchers at wealthy and prestigious institutions. Last year, for instance, Oxford University library had to inform faculty that its OA fund had been exhausted and so they should delay submitting to journals until it had been replenished. 

 

At the same time, the bureaucracy surrounding OA compliance has become so complex that universities have had to recruit legions of support staff to interpret and manage the escalating number of policies (some of which have proved contradictory). Indeed, such is the complexity now that even specialist support staff can struggle to decode the rules.

 

In short, the UK OA policy environment is far too complex, and it is seriously underfunded. For researchers, this is frustrating and depressing….”

Scholarly E-Books and University Presses – Part Two – The Scholarly Kitchen

“What happens to print when digital is available first and for free? Does print get cannibalized by free, open digital. Or does free, open digital lead to more print activity?

LB [Lisa Bayer]: Rather than a complement, which might imply subsidiary, I see e-books and aggregated digital content as equally important to print for scholarly books. For complex and diverse reasons, monographs are much less likely to be purchased in print editions by research libraries, especially given the enhanced accessibility, portability, and discoverability that digitally delivered content affords. When we send our content to aggregators, we join a huge network of scholarly publishers reaching thousands of institutions worldwide: that is mission-critical. At one of the last O’Reilly Tools of Change for Publishing conferences I heard a smart person say, “The page is no longer primary.” For most of our customers, print books are still primary. But university presses operate in a file-based ecosystem, increasingly so with Open Access pilots and platforms such as Manifold, PubPub, Fulcrum, Humanities Open Book, and the Sustainable History Monograph Program….”