Open access: how COVID-19 will change the way research findings are shared | News | Wellcome

“During the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers and publishers have pulled together to publish their outputs at an unprecedented rate. So, how have they responded? And how will this change research culture and the way findings are disseminated in future? …

Subscription publishers have stepped up to respond to this global emergency by removing paywalls and allowing content to be reused. But this has also shone a spotlight on the shortcomings of the traditional scholarly publishing system, which is not fit for purpose in the 21st century.   

A business model in which 75% of the research literature is only accessible to paying subscribers(opens in a new tab) is unacceptable, especially as much of that research has been funded by the public purse….”

DORA’s first funder discussion: updates from Swiss National Science Foundation, Wellcome Trust, and the Dutch Research Council – DORA

“DORA launched a new virtual discussion series for public and private research funders on Wednesday, March 26. The goal of the series is to increase communication about research assessment reform by providing a space for funders to share and discuss new initiatives. We hope this will ultimately serve as a platform to accelerate the spread of good research assessment policies and practices.

Representatives from the Swiss National Science Foundation, Dutch Research Council, and Wellcome Trust provided updates on some of their pilot projects….”

Sharing research data and findings relevant to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak | Wellcome

“We call on researchers, journals and funders to ensure that research findings and data relevant to this outbreak are shared rapidly and openly to inform the public health response and help save lives.

We affirm the commitment to the principles set out in the 2016 Statement on data sharing in public health emergencies, and will seek to ensure that the World Health Organization (WHO) has rapid access to emerging findings that could aid the global response….

Specifically, we commit to work together to help ensure:

all peer-reviewed research publications relevant to the outbreak are made immediately open access, or freely available at least for the duration of the outbreak
research findings relevant to the outbreak are shared immediately with the WHO upon journal submission, by the journal and with author knowledge
research findings are made available via preprint servers before journal publication, or via platforms that make papers openly accessible before peer review, with clear statements regarding the availability of underlying data
researchers share interim and final research data relating to the outbreak, together with protocols and standards used to collect the data, as rapidly and widely as possible – including with public health and research communities and the WHO
authors are clear that data or preprints shared ahead of submission will not pre-empt its publication in these journals….”

Open peer-review platform for COVID-19 preprints

“The public call for rapid sharing of research data relevant to the COVID-19 outbreak (see go.nature.com/2t1lyp6) is driving an unprecedented surge in (unrefereed) preprints. To help pinpoint the most important research, we have launched Outbreak Science Rapid PREreview, with support from the London-based charity Wellcome. This is an open-source platform for rapid review of preprints related to emerging outbreaks (see https://outbreaksci.prereview.org).

These reviews comprise responses to short, yes-or-no questions, with optional commenting. The questions are designed to capture structured, high-level input on the importance and quality of the research, which can be aggregated across several reviews. Scientists who have ORCID IDs can submit their reviews as they read the preprints (currently limited to the medRxiv, bioRxiv and arXiv repositories). The reviews are open and can be submitted anonymously….”

Outbreak Science Rapid PREreview • Home

“Outbreak Science Rapid PREreview is a web application for open, rapid reviews of outbreak-related preprints.

On this platform you can:

Find rapid reviews of existing preprints;
Request reviews of preprints (your own, or preprints you are interested in);
Review preprints.

This open project is funded by the Wellcome Trust as a collaboration between Outbreak Science and PREreview.

Outbreak Science is a non-profit organization aiming to advance the science of outbreak response. Outbreak Science supports early and open dissemination of data, code, and research.

PREreview is an open project fiscally sponsored by the non-profit organization Code for Science & Society. PREreview’s mission is to increase diversity in the scholarly peer review process by empowering all researchers to engage with preprint reviews….”

News & Views: Curate or Perish? – Delta Think

“Wellcome Trust and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) recently announced the launch of the “Learned Society Curation Awards,” a new funding initiative designed to reward societies who are looking beyond publishing when thinking of their future contributions.

What might this statement tell us about the vision these funders’ have for learned societies in an open future? …

The awards—up to £200,000 over three years—are for those who “want to explore new ways of signaling the significance of published research outputs in an open and transparent manner.”…

How often do substantial grants and awards become available to fund society experimentation? The Learned Society Curation Awards offer eligible societies the chance to fund pilot projects that may provide for new sources of revenue in the future. This should be welcome news for societies seeking to explore non-publication-based revenue and to diversify for improved financial sustainability.”

Sharing research data and findings relevant to the novel coronavirus (nCoV) outbreak | Wellcome

“The outbreak of the novel coronavirus in China (2019-nCoV) represents a significant and urgent threat to global health.

We call on researchers, journals and funders to ensure that research findings and data relevant to this outbreak are shared rapidly and openly to inform the public health response and help save lives.

We affirm the commitment to the principles set out in the 2016 Statement on data sharing in public health emergencies, and will seek to ensure that the World Health Organization (WHO) has rapid access to emerging findings that could aid the global response.

Specifically, we commit to work together to help ensure:

all peer-reviewed research publications relevant to the outbreak are made immediately open access, or freely available at least for the duration of the outbreak
research findings relevant to the outbreak are shared immediately with the WHO upon journal submission, by the journal and with author knowledge
research findings are made available via preprint servers before journal publication, or via platforms that make papers openly accessible before peer review, with clear statements regarding the availability of underlying data
researchers share interim and final research data relating to the outbreak, together with protocols and standards used to collect the data, as rapidly and widely as possible – including with public health and research communities and the WHO
authors are clear that data or preprints shared ahead of submission will not pre-empt its publication in these journals…”

Wellcome Open Research: a summary of year 3 | Wellcome Open Research Blog

“The Wellcome Open Research (WOR) publishing platform has been fully operational for three years and in this time has grown to become the third most used venue for Wellcome-funded researchers to share their research findings. In this blog post, we provide an analysis of publishing activity on the WOR platform and preview some of the activities we have planned for 2020….

2020 will be a time of change for F1000 Research – the company who manage the WOR platform – following the sale of the company to Taylor and Francis. However, we do not believe this will have any immediate impact on WOR, and indeed are seeing this acquisition as testament that the drive for open research publishing is gathering momentum….”

‘People can’t learn about treatments they need’: why open access to medical research matters | Education | The Guardian

“Around the same time as the Simms case, Steel made it his mission to gather and disseminate relevant research papers to other vCJD sufferers after his brother, Richard, died from the disease. “That was 18 years ago,” he says. “Yet there are still the same barriers stopping people from reading about research – from learning about the treatment they need.” 

In other words, hiding research papers behind a subscription paywall – as is the case for an estimated two-thirds of all research – could be killing people. There are countless examples of how failure to share science openly can have a devastating impact on public health.

It’s happening now: the outbreak of coronavirus in China prompted the director of the Wellcome Trust to call for medical findings to be shared freely and widely to prevent the spread of the disease and improve treatments for patients. …”