Research on Research Institute Launches to Enable More Strategic, Open, Diverse, And Inclusive Research

“We’re thrilled to announce the launch of the Research on Research Institute (RoRI) – an international consortium of research funders, academic institutions, and technologists working to champion the latest approaches to research on research.

Co-founded by the Wellcome Trust, the universities of Sheffield and Leiden, and Digital Science, the RoRI consortium will undertake transformative and translational research on research (also known as meta-research, science of science or meta-science). By analysing research systems and experimenting with decision and evaluation data, tools and frameworks, we aim to advance more strategic, open, diverse and inclusive research….”

Society Publishers Accelerating Open access and Plan S (SPA-OPS) project

“This collection contains the key outputs from the Society Publishers Accelerating Open access and Plan S (SPA-OPS) project. This project set out to identify routes through which learned society publishers could successfully transition to open access (OA) and align with Plan S.

This project was led by Alicia Wise and Lorraine Estelle of Information Power, and was commissioned by Wellcome, UK Research and Innovation, and the Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers (ALPSP)….”

Report and Toolkit to Support Learned Society Publishers Transition to Immediate Open Access | Plan S

“cOAlition S aims to work with publishers, societies, consortia, and other stakeholders to accelerate the transition to Open Access. One of the current priorities is to develop clearer approaches to transformative arrangements towards full and immediate Open Access. Today an independent report and toolkit are launched to do just this.

This work was commissioned by Wellcome and UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) – two UK members of cOAlition S – in partnership with the Association of Learned & Professional Society Publishers (ALPSP). Information Power were appointed to lead the project.

The resulting report and toolkit are designed to help support learned society publishers to accelerate their transition to Open Access, and enter into transformative agreements that unlock a multi-year transitional pathway compliant with Plan S for hybrid Open Access titles. All outputs are available under a CC-BY licence at: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.c.4561397 …”

Society Publishers Accelerating Open Access and Plan S – Final Project Report

The final project report from the Society Publishers Accelerating Open access and Plan S (SPA-OPS) project. The report presents the results of work to identify and assess a range of potential models through which learned societies could successfully transition to the requirements of Plans S. Based on the research undertaken, the report sets out recommendations for learned society publishers and other stakeholders committed to supporting them in making this transition. This work was conducted by Alicia Wise and Lorraine Estelle of Information Power. The SPA-OPS project was commissioned by Wellcome, UKRI, and the Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers (ALPSP).

Towards a framework to enable more transparent communication of Open Access publishing services and their prices

“cOAlition S aims to help make the nature and prices of OA publishing services more transparent, and to enable conversations and comparisons that will build confidence amongst customers that prices are fair and reasonable.

Wellcome – in partnership with UKRI and on behalf of cOAlition S – have appointed Information Power to lead a collaborative project with publishers, funders and universities to develop a framework for these communications. The project team – including Alicia Wise, Lorraine Estelle, and Hazel Woodward – see this as an exciting opportunity to facilitate stakeholders working together to accelerate the transition to Open Access. 

We will:

consult widely with stakeholders to understand concerns and needs,

focus on identifying high-level categories of services provided in exchange for APCs or transformative arrangements

work to gain the voluntary support of members of these groups to deliver greater pricing transparency, and in ways that can be maintained and monitored

The project will not explore costs, nor current or future pricing….”

Towards a framework to enable more transparent communication of Open Access publishing services and their prices

“cOAlition S aims to help make the nature and prices of OA publishing services more transparent, and to enable conversations and comparisons that will build confidence amongst customers that prices are fair and reasonable.

Wellcome – in partnership with UKRI and on behalf of cOAlition S – have appointed Information Power to lead a collaborative project with publishers, funders and universities to develop a framework for these communications. The project team – including Alicia Wise, Lorraine Estelle, and Hazel Woodward – see this as an exciting opportunity to facilitate stakeholders working together to accelerate the transition to Open Access. 

We will:

consult widely with stakeholders to understand concerns and needs,

focus on identifying high-level categories of services provided in exchange for APCs or transformative arrangements

work to gain the voluntary support of members of these groups to deliver greater pricing transparency, and in ways that can be maintained and monitored

The project will not explore costs, nor current or future pricing….”

Wellcome updates open access policy to align with cOAlition S | Wellcome

“Following a large consultation, we have updated our open access (OA) policy so it now aligns with Plan S. The changes will apply from 1 January 2021. …

These are the key changes to our OA policy.  

 

  • All Wellcome-funded research articles must be made freely available through PubMed Central (PMC) and Europe PMC at the time of publication. We previously allowed a six-month embargo period. This change will make sure that the peer-reviewed version is freely available to everyone at the time of publication.
  • All articles must be published under a Creative Commons attribution licence (CC-BY), unless we have agreed, as an exception, to allow publication under a CC-BY-ND licence. We previously only required a CC-BY licence when an article processing charge (APC) was paid. This change will make sure that others – including commercial entities and AI/text-data mining services – can reuse our funded research to discover new knowledge.
  • Authors or their institutions must retain copyright for their research articles and hold the rights necessary to make a version of the article immediately available under a compliant open licence.
  • We will no longer cover the cost of OA publishing in subscription journals (‘hybrid OA’), outside of a transformative arrangement. We previously supported this model, but no longer believe that it supports a transition to full OA.  
  • Where there is a significant public health benefit to preprints being shared widely and rapidly, such as a disease outbreak, these preprints must be published:
    • before peer review
    • on an approved platform that supports immediate publication of the complete manuscript
    • under a CC-BY licence.

    This is a new requirement which will make sure that important research findings are shared as soon possible and before peer review.

  • Wellcome-funded organisations must sign or publicly commit to the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment(opens in a new tab) (DORA), or an equivalent. We may ask organisations to show that they’re complying with this as part of our organisation audits. This is a new requirement to encourage organisations to consider the intrinsic merit of the work when making promotion and tenure decisions, not just the title of the journal or publisher….”

Should funders driving for universal open access in research be obliged to ensure freedom of publication for all? | The BMJ

Large funders are moving to enforce open access to their research.1 The Wellcome Trust’s open access policy will change on 1 January 2020 to fund only article processing charges (APCs) in fully open access journals, deliberately not funding open access charges in hybrid journals.2 The aim of this change is to support a transition to a fully open access world. This policy is driven by the aim of transitioning journals to become open access rather than simply making their own research available to a greater audience. Journals may choose to chase the funder’s APC money, becoming fully open access, but this will be at the cost of barring their journal to authors who do not have funding to pay the increasing numbers of APCs that will be required.

A significant APC will shift the decision whether to publish a potential article from the journal editor and peer reviewers to the purse holders of the APC funds, who could deny it getting that far. This is more benign in the case of Wellcome, which does not deduct APCs from individual grants, but it may in the short term reduce the range of journals available to authors. However, in the case of commercially funded research or in institutions with more limited money, decisions by APC fundholders could stifle academic results.

Given that the Wellcome’s open access policy aims to shift the landscape of scientific publishing, journals becoming fully open access to meet these new requirements could charge a tiered social pricing structure in which research from funders requiring fully open access journals (rather than just for their own research) are charged a premium. This premium could be used to fund the APCs in that journal of researchers who have little or no recourse to other APC funding. This would reduce potential publication bias based on funding, as well as creating an environment of open access for all.”

Why should the public be involved in science? | ORION Open Science

” “For research to be really impactful, the public has to be involved. They need to understand the research and we need to help to connect the research to what people care about,” says Imran Khan, Head of Public Engagement at Wellcome Trust in the UK, one of the world’s largest research funders. But do the public wish to be involved in science? The German and Swedish Science Barometers, the EU-project ORION Open Science European public attitudes survey and the Wellcome Trust Global Monitor have all asked this question….

After the presentations, the participants discussed in smaller groups why and how the public should be involved in science. They then shared their thoughts both orally and by using an online tool. According to the workshop participants, the public should be involved in science because: 

  • Science will have an impact on their lives.
  • We need the views of the public.
  • Knowledge gives insights and increases trust. It’s a base for democracy.
  • It can improve quality and broaden perspectives.
  • They pay for it!

But how can we interest the public to get involved? Some suggestions from the participants in the workshop included:

  • Must depart from their own interest and relevance.
  • The wow effect – science is fun!
  • Create arenas for connection between researchers and the public.
  • Show how research affects society and how you can contribute.
  • Make participating fun and giving….”