Automatic Permissions Checker

“These tools aim to make permission checking faster, easier, and clearer so that you can unlock the power of mediated deposit and more easily manage your repository. In this prototype, powered by open, community-editable, machine-readable data, we allow librarians to do permission checking on 100s of articles or journals in seconds and, for each one, to receive embargos, completed deposit statements, metadata, open access availability, and more. We cover 20,000 journals, 250 publishers, 80 university policies, several funders, and even authors’ negotiated contracts or waivers. We hope to get your feedback as we move from prototypes, to full APIs and tools for authors….”

Narrowing the Gap Between Publication and Access: Is a Mandate Enough to Get Us Closer?[v1] | Preprints

Abstract:  Changes brought about by the Internet to Scholarly Communication and the spread of Open Access movement, have made it possible to increase the number of potential readers of published research dramatically. This two-phase study aims, at first, to assert the satisfaction of the potential for increased open access to articles published by authors at the University of Coimbra, in a context when there was no stimulus for the openness of published science other than an institutional mandate set by the University policy on Open Access (“Acesso Livre”). The satisfaction of the access openness was measured by observing the actual archiving behavior of researchers (either directly or through their agents). We started by selecting the top journal titles used to publish the STEM research of the University of Coimbra (2004-2013) by using Thomson Reuters’ Science Citation Index (SCI). These titles were available at the University libraries or through online subscriptions, some of them in open access (21%). By checking the journals’ policy at the time regarding self-archiving at the SHERPA/RoMEO service, we found that the percentage of articles in Open Access (OA) could rise to 80% if deposited at Estudo Geral, the Institutional Repository of the University of Coimbra, as prescribed by the Open Access Policy of the University. As we concluded by verifying the deposit status of every single paper of researchers of the University that published in those journals, this potential was far from being fulfilled, despite the existence of the institutional mandate and favorable editorial conditions. We concluded, therefore, that an institutional mandate was not sufficient by itself to fully implement an open access policy and to close the gap between publication and access. The second phase of the study, to follow, will rescan the status of published papers in a context where the Portuguese public funding agency, the Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia, introduced in 2014 a new significant stimulus for open access in science. The FCT Open Access Policy stipulates that publicly funded published research must be available as soon as possible in a repository of the Portuguese network of scientific repositories, RCAAP, which integrates the Estudo Geral.

Automating repository workflows with Orpheus, an Open Source database of journals and publishers

Abstract:  Repository management relies on knowledge of numerous attributes of academic journals, such as revenue model (subscription, hybrid or fully Open Access), self-archiving policies, licences, contacts for queries and article processing charges (APCs). While datasets collating some of this information are helpful to repository administrators, most cover only one or few of those attributes (e.g., APC price lists from publishers), do not provide APIs or their API responses are not machine readable (self-archiving policies from RoMEO), or are not updated very often (licences and APCs from DOAJ). As a result, most repositories still rely on administrative staff looking up and entering required attributes manually. To solve this problem and increase automation of tasks performed by the Cambridge repository team, I developed Orpheus, a database of academic journals/publishers written in Django. Orpheus was recently integrated with our DSpace repository Apollo and auxiliary systems via its RESTful API, enabling embargo periods to be automatically applied to deposited articles and streamlining the process of advising researchers on payments, licences and compliance to funders’ Open Access policies. Orpheus is Open Source (https://github.com/osc-cam/orpheus) and may be easily expanded or tailored to meet the particular needs of other repositories and Scholarly Communication services.

Self-Archiving Email Templates

Authors not responding to your emails to self-archive in your institutional repository, or just getting started? Our tried and tested templates are here to help get authors enthusiastic and educated about self-archiving. There’s one template for every situation, and each template is ready to use, backed up with performance data, and designed by experimentation and experience….”

New tool and dataset make permissions checking easier, faster, and clearer for libraries.

“Together with librarians, we’re building a new way to perform permissions checking that is backed by a modern approach and informed by a decade of experience and open, community-editable, machine-readable data. Today, we’re releasing a prototype of that system, a bulk automated permissions checker (and its data), which is specialized for use during mediated deposit and en masse outreach and built to check hundreds of articles and journals in seconds. It returns comprehensive permissions information, along with complete article metadata and links to open access versions. Try the tool today at: openaccessbutton.org/permissions. …”

ShareYourPaper.org

“Sharing should be simple. With shareyourpaper.org, we’ll make sure that deposit into any repository is just that. We’re building a workflow that removes barriers we’ve seen after asking thousands of authors to self-archive, as well as easily upgrades the deposit workflow in thousands of repositories. For libraries, shareyourpaper.org helps you fill your repository by offering the simplest possible deposit workflow for authors, while saving you time and requiring no migrations or upgrades to your current repository….”

Building shareyourpaper.org to make self-archiving the simplest way to increase a paper’s impact.

“Self-archiving needs to be simpler to unleash its power as an equitable route to open access. Yet, it’s too hard for individual repositories to overhaul their existing user experience. We’re building shareyourpaper.org to transform deposit from an often complicated, time-consuming process into one that’s possible in just a few clicks, for any repository without the need for complex integrations. Shareyourpaper.org is a tool that automates the deposit workflow?—?metadata entry, permissions and version checking?—?to require only the single manual step of uploading the paper itself. Libraries looking to fill their repositories can learn more and help us build the tool by signing up….

Late this year, we plan to launch shareyourpaper.org for anyone, everywhere, to deposit wherever they are in the publishing process. It’ll be free, built on open-source code, community-curated open data, simple documented APIs, library values, and resources that enable others to do even better. If you’d like to learn more or contribute in any way, please express your interest.…”

Depositing and reporting of reagents: Accelerating open and reproducible science. | The Official PLOS Blog

Centralized depositing of materials advances science in so many ways. It saves authors the time and burden of shipping requested materials. Researchers who request from repositories save time by not having to recreate reagents or wait months or years to receive samples. Many scientists have been on the receiving end of a request that was filled by an incorrect or degraded sample, which further delays research. Repositories like the ones recommended by PLOS handle the logistics of material requests, letting the scientists focus on what’s important: doing research….

By encouraging authors to deposit materials at the time of publication, journals will help accelerate research through timely distribution and accurate identification of reagents. Biological repositories exist to serve the scientific community. Take Addgene’s involvement in the explosive advancement of CRISPR research. Since 2012, over 8,400 CRISPR plasmids have been deposited and Addgene has distributed over 144,000 CRISPR plasmids worldwide, enabling researchers to share, modify, and improve this game-changing molecular tool. It is a prime example of the positive impact that biological repositories are making on research….”