2020 EUA Webinar Series on Academic Career Assessment in the Transition to Open Science

“EUA is pleased to present a webinar series based on the “2020 EUA Workshop on Academic Career Assessment in the Transition to Open Science”. To support measures to contain the spread of the coronavirus, EUA cancelled the physical event, but will organise webinars starting on Monday, 18 May. Each webinar will last one hour and will include interaction with the audience.

The European higher education, research and innovation landscape is changing. A broad range of academic activities are gaining even more prominence, including Open Access publishing, digital learning and teaching, and new forms of knowledge exchange with society. Universities are rethinking how to incentivise and reward these and other activities as part of their approach to career assessment.

The discussion on career assessment has taken major steps forward since the 2019 EUA workshop on this topic. This webinar series will draw from current discussions and incorporates them in a forward-looking debate that will be of interest to institutional leaders (rectors, vice-rectors and heads of administration), research department staff and management involved in learning and teaching, as well as representatives of other organisations….”

DORA statement on hiring, promotion, and funding decisions during the COVID-19 pandemic – DORA

“DORA calls on all universities and research institutions to:

Redefine their expectations for productivity in the wake of the present pandemic.
Communicate clearly to academics and researchers how they will modify research evaluation procedures for hiring, promotion, and tenure.

We applaud those that have already taken action (e.g. see: here). In a similar vein, DORA calls on research funders to reassure applicants that they will also take account of the productivity impact of the COVID-19 crisis….”

DORA statement on hiring, promotion, and funding decisions during the COVID-19 pandemic – DORA

“DORA calls on all universities and research institutions to:

Redefine their expectations for productivity in the wake of the present pandemic.
Communicate clearly to academics and researchers how they will modify research evaluation procedures for hiring, promotion, and tenure.

We applaud those that have already taken action (e.g. see: here). In a similar vein, DORA calls on research funders to reassure applicants that they will also take account of the productivity impact of the COVID-19 crisis….”

DORA’s first funder discussion: updates from Swiss National Science Foundation, Wellcome Trust, and the Dutch Research Council – DORA

“DORA launched a new virtual discussion series for public and private research funders on Wednesday, March 26. The goal of the series is to increase communication about research assessment reform by providing a space for funders to share and discuss new initiatives. We hope this will ultimately serve as a platform to accelerate the spread of good research assessment policies and practices.

Representatives from the Swiss National Science Foundation, Dutch Research Council, and Wellcome Trust provided updates on some of their pilot projects….”

GOOD PRACTICE IN RESEARCHER EVALUATION. RECOMMENDATION FOR THE RESPONSIBLE EVALUATION OF A RESEARCHER IN FINLAND

“This is a recommendation for the responsible evaluation of a researcher. In this context, a researcher is a person who is a member of the teaching and research staff of a Finnish university or research institute or is primarily engaged in research or applying for research funding. This recommendation has been drafted from the point of view of an individual researcher evaluation. The same principles should be followed when evaluating research organizations, research units, and research in a broader context. The recommendation is recommended to use in conjunction with The Finnish Advisory Board on Research Integrity’s (TENK) template for a researcher’s curriculum vitae. This recommendation was accepted on 4th of February, 2020, by a working group set up by the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies (TSV) in October 2018….”

Malta Open Access policy report finalised

“The development of Malta’s National Open Access Policy has been entrusted to the Malta Council for Science and Technology (MCST), a governmental body that falls under the Parliamentary Secretary for Financial Services and Digital Economy within the Ministry for Finance and Financial Services.

With support from the European Horizon 2020 Policy Support Facility, the MCST started developing Malta’s tailor-made Open Access policy during a meeting in Brussels in July 2019. This was followed by two visits to Malta in October and December 2019 by representatives of the European Commission and its appointed independent experts. During their first visit, the delegates held individual meetings with national stakeholders, while in the second visit, a workshop for the stakeholders was arranged.

The final report with the recommendations on the national Open Access policy was recently launched at an online video conference organised by the MCST and streamed live on the council’s social media access. A recording of the full live stream may be found at www.facebook.com/MaltaCouncilforScienceandTechonology/videos/25844896151292

The final report can be accessed via the MCST website below.

https://mcst.gov.mt/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/OPEN-ACCESS-MALTA-REPORT.pdf …”

Knowledge Exchange Openness Profile – Knowledge Exchange

“Part of KE’s work on Open Scholarship aims to enhance the evaluation of research and researchers. This currently does not cover recognition of non-academic contributions to make Open Scholarship work, such as activities to open up and curate data for re-use, or making research results findable and available. Our approach is to raise more awareness on the lack of recognition in current evaluation practice and work towards a possible solution, through the development of an ‘Openness Profile’.

The KE Open Scholarship Research Evaluation task & finish group works on the awareness issue, listing all academic and non-academic contributions that are essential to Open Scholarship and should be recognised when evaluating research. The group also works on the Openness Profile, a tool that is meant to allow evaluation of currently ignored contributions that are essential for Open Scholarship. For the development of the Openness Profile we seek involvement of various key stakeholders and alignment with current identifiers such as DOI and ORCID iD.

By demonstrating the immaturity of current research evaluation practice, and by developing the Openness Profile tool, KE supports researchers as well as non-researchers to get credit for all their contributions that make Open Scholarship possible. Our ambition is that recognition of these essential activities becomes part of standard research evaluation routine….”

Knowledge Exchange Openness Profile – Knowledge Exchange

“Part of KE’s work on Open Scholarship aims to enhance the evaluation of research and researchers. This currently does not cover recognition of non-academic contributions to make Open Scholarship work, such as activities to open up and curate data for re-use, or making research results findable and available. Our approach is to raise more awareness on the lack of recognition in current evaluation practice and work towards a possible solution, through the development of an ‘Openness Profile’.

The KE Open Scholarship Research Evaluation task & finish group works on the awareness issue, listing all academic and non-academic contributions that are essential to Open Scholarship and should be recognised when evaluating research. The group also works on the Openness Profile, a tool that is meant to allow evaluation of currently ignored contributions that are essential for Open Scholarship. For the development of the Openness Profile we seek involvement of various key stakeholders and alignment with current identifiers such as DOI and ORCID iD.

By demonstrating the immaturity of current research evaluation practice, and by developing the Openness Profile tool, KE supports researchers as well as non-researchers to get credit for all their contributions that make Open Scholarship possible. Our ambition is that recognition of these essential activities becomes part of standard research evaluation routine….”

The Sorbonne Declaration on Research Data Rights

“Indeed, the Sorbonne Declaration echoes other open scholarship policies in calling for integrating data management into standard research workflows and calls for the development of infrastructure and funding to enable it. Quoting researchers from Go8 institutions, Ross notes that, as a statement developed by influential research organizations around the world, the Declaration has the potential to lead to significant change in countries with “fragmented” open data policies, as well as those with more developed ones (2020a). He cites Canada’s Digital Research Infrastructure Strategy as an example of a well-developed policy and suggests that the Declaration is an important policy to keep in mind as the details of Canada’s DRI funding are decided. Canada’s recently released Roadmap for Open Science also emphasizes the need for data to be “open by design and by default,” and to follow FAIR principles (Government of Canada 2020).

As discussed in “The Review, Promotion, and Tenure Project at the ScholCommLab,” institutional policies that do not recognize or reward open scholarship are widely recognized as a barrier to cultural change. In acknowledgement of this, and as a way of encouraging a necessary cultural shift, the Declaration also includes a commitment to working towards changing these policies….”