Recommended Data Repositories : Scientific Data

Scientific Data mandates the release of datasets accompanying our Data Descriptors, but we do not ourselves host data. Instead, we ask authors to submit datasets to an appropriate public data repository. Data should be submitted to discipline-specific, community-recognized repositories where possible, or to generalist repositories if no suitable community resource is available.

Repositories included on this page have been evaluated to ensure that they meet our requirements for data access, preservation and stability. Please be aware, however, that some repositories on this page may only accept data from those funded by specific sources, or may charge for hosting data. Please ensure you are aware of any deposition policies for your chosen repository. If your repository of choice is not listed please see our guidelines for suggesting additional repositories….”

Publications Router – new publishers join, and next steps | Jisc scholarly communications

“Two major new publishers are enabling Jisc Publications Router to supply their content to institutional repositories. This helps institutions ensure they are compliant with funders’ open access (OA) policies and alerts them to the existence of their researchers’ articles.”

Nature Publishing Group and ReadCube Unveil Preliminary Results of Scientific Article Sharing Trial

“Nature Publishing Group, part of Springer Nature, has announced the results of its ground-breaking 12-month content sharing initiative to support collaborative research. The trial has concluded with positive results and the initiative to offer on-platform sharing of the full text of nature.com articles using ReadCube’s enhanced PDF technology will continue indefinitely.

In December 2014, a 12-month content sharing trial was set up to enable subscribers to 49 journals on nature.com to legitimately and conveniently share the full text of articles of interest with colleagues without a subscription via a shareable web link on nature.com, enabled by publishing technology company, ReadCube. The trial was also extended to 100 media outlets and blogs around the world that report on the findings of articles published on nature.com, allowing them to provide their own readers with a link to a full text, read-only view of the original scientific paper….”

Research & Development Co-Ordinator job with SPRINGER NATURE | Guardian Jobs

“We have an exciting opportunity to join the research and development team in the Open Research Group at Nature Publishing Group and Palgrave Macmillan. This role would suit a graduate with an interest in open access publishing who is looking to gain experience in this rapidly developing area of scholarly communications….”

Research & Development Co-Ordinator job with SPRINGER NATURE

“We have an exciting opportunity to join the research and development team in the Open Research Group at Nature Publishing Group and Palgrave Macmillan. This role would suit a graduate with an interest in open access publishing who is looking to gain experience in this rapidly developing area of scholarly communications….”

OVER 60% OF 2015 RESEARCH ARTICLES ON NATURE.COM ARE OPEN ACCESS

“Nature Publishing Group publishes 63% of research articles via open access models; 96% of authors choose CC BY….Open access is thriving at Nature Publishing Group (NPG). Sixty three per cent of original research articles published to date on nature.com in 2015 are open access, nearly 10,000 papers. Ten years ago, NPG introduced its first fully open access journal. Today, NPG publishes over 80 journals with an open access option.

In January 2015, NPG introduced Creative Commons Attribution license (CC BY) as the default open access license option on its 20+ fully owned open access journals. The percentage of authors choosing CC BY across all of NPG’s open access journals has risen dramatically – from 26% in 2014 to 96% in September 2015. Other licenses are still available on demand.

This week is global Open Access Week, and also marks one year since NPG, now part of Springer Nature, announced that Nature Communications would become its flagship open access journal.

Sam Burridge, Managing Director, Open Research at Springer Nature said: “We believe we’re the first of the longstanding science publishers to reach the landmark of over 60% open access content. By switching Nature Communications to full open access one year ago, we demonstrated our willingness to take a bold step and innovate in the open research space, creating a home for the highest quality open research. And we’re encouraging our authors to choose more permissive licenses too….”

Concerns dwindle over quality of open access journals | Times Higher Education

“A dwindling number of researchers have concerns about the quality of open access journals, according to a major survey of scholars. Yet journal reputation remains far more important than whether or not it is open access when academics are deciding where to submit, according to the annual study by Nature Publishing Group and Palgrave Macmillan. Last year, four in 10 scientists who had not published in open access journals said that they were ‘concerned about perceptions of the quality’, but this year only 27 per cent said that they had these worries. Humanities, business and social science academics are more concerned – with 41 per cent still having concerns – but this is still substantially fewer than last year …”

Perceptions of open access publishing are changing for the better

“A survey of 22,000 academic researchers by Nature Publishing Group (NPG) and Palgrave Macmillan has found that a decreasing number of authors are concerned about perceptions of the quality of open access publications.

In 2014, 40% of scientists who had not published open access in the last three years said “I am concerned about perceptions of the quality of OA publications.” But this year, only 27% said they were concerned. In the humanities, business and social sciences (HSS), the drop was more marked; from 54% in 2014 to 41% in 2015. Nonetheless, concerns about perceptions of the quality of OA publications is still the leading factor in authors choosing not to publish OA….”