Job Opportunity: Director of Product Engineering – Creative Commons

“The Director of Product Engineering reports to the CEO and will lead the development and implementation of CC’s products and services. You’ll be responsible for the CC Search roadmap and the review and enhancement of existing tools to ensure their successful adoption on the web. This is a rare opportunity to lead within an organization that is fundamental to sharing online, operating at a global scale. The successful candidate will lead a technical team to meet the needs of this vital organization, and to build a more vibrant, usable global commons, powered by collaboration and gratitude.

We believe that diverse teams build better organizations and better services. Applications from qualified candidates from all backgrounds, including those from under-represented communities, are very welcome.

The Director of Product Engineering leads the technology team to:

  • Develop, lead and implement an ambitious product strategy, including a product and service roadmap for CC Search and other relevant services. Lead a small team aligned with our goal of a more vibrant, usable commons powered by collaboration and gratitude
  • Attract and oversee a small team of software developers and UX designers to build innovative, robust software both for CC use and for public release
  • Work in the open, in public repositories, open chat rooms, public wikis and a global community
  • Work with the CEO and Director of Development to seek funding for CC’s various technical projects
  • Represent the organization and provide technical leadership within various open communities and with CC partners. Coordinate with other outside communities, companies, and institutions to further Creative Commons’ mission, for example: W3C, non-profit communities like EFF, Open Knowledge, and Wikipedians, and the open data, open access, library, and open education communities”

Let’s speed up science by embracing open access publishing

“Despite this success story, most scientific research today is not published openly — meaning freely, to everyone, without delay from the time of publication. Instead, it lives behind time embargoes and paywalls, costing as much as $35 per article to access. Even when scientific information is free to read, it is subject to copyright restrictions that prevent it from being recast quickly in new ways.”

Lulu Launches Academic Publishing Platform

“Lulu, a pioneer in the self-publishing market, has set its sights on a new segment: academics.

In an a release this week, Lulu announced the launch of, Glasstree, an online publishing platform dedicated to academic and scholarly authors and communities. Lulu officials say that Glasstree will provide a suite of online tools and services needed by academic authors, and will leverage technology, such as print-on-demand, to distribute their works more cost-effectively. Lulu says its service is centered on addressing some “critical pain points” in the commercial academic publishing market, such as accelerating time to market, more transparent pricing, and reversing the revenue model to allow academics and scholars to realize 70% of the profit from sales of their work.

Among Glasstree’s advertised services: support for open access, including the deposit of works in institutional repositories; Tools for bibliometric tracking, so academic authors can monitor Impact Factors, and other relevant measurements; More control over licensing options, through a partnership with Creative Commons; and access to traditional peer review….”

Glasstree Publishing

“The existing academic publishing model is broken, with traditional commercial publishers charging excessive prices for books or ridiculous book publishing charges to publish Open Access books.

Academics or their supporting institutions are poorly paid for their content. Profit margins are strongly skewed towards the publisher, with crumbs for the author and/or their employers. Submission to publication times are far too lengthy and service and marketing support insufficient.

Besides the lack of editorial assistance, marketing support, and a complete absence of urgency, traditional academic publishers are now often viewed as cherishing profits over the advancement of knowledge, and accommodate their shareholders over their authors….

Glasstree challenges the traditional academic publishing model by providing academics with the flexibility to be in complete control of their content….”

European university presses and the transition to open access – Stockholm University Press Blog

“Amsterdam University Press is an example of a University Press that has found a business model for open access publishing, by requesting high author fees, or Book processing charges (BPC’s), for open access publishing with CC-licenses. This is very common and also what most commercial publishers do. Here I find that Stockholm University Press (SUP) and other Ubiquity Press Partners, have a priceworthy business model for our authors.”

SCOAP3 journals double downloads – SCOAP3

“Elsevier announced that downloads to their two journals, Physics Letters B and Nuclear Physics B have doubled since they became Open Access at the start of SCOAP3 in January 2014. This increase is remarkable as SCOAP3 covers the most recent 3,500 articles in the journals, while most of the historic content of over 77,000 articles, is available to subscribers.

SpringerNature announced that since January 2014 they have observed a doubling of  downloads across their two learned-society journals participating in SCOAP3: European Physical Journal C and the Journal of High Energy Physics.”

Naija AgroNet: Open data concept, application for agriculture according to Steve Nyumba

“Nyumba, in a presentation at the recently concluded week-long training for CAADP Journalists Network in Nairobi, capital of Kenya, dwelt on “Open Data for Agriculture” said that in being open connotes a lot for different people and media practitioners must ensure whatever definition they are using is seemingly holistic.”

Faculty Survey Open Educational Resources | Babson College

“?????Awareness of open educational resources (OER) among U.S. higher education teaching faculty has improved, but still remains less than a majority, according to a new report from the Babson Survey Research Group (BSRG).”