Join Us in Washington D.C. to Celebrate Culture and Heritage on Public Domain Day

Creative Commons is pleased to be a part of the second annual Public Domain Day celebration held in Washington D.C. on January 30, 2020! 

In collaboration with the Internet Archive, the Institute for Intellectual Property & Social Justice, the Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property, and SPARC, this event will “bring together a diverse group of organizations, musicians, artists, activists, and thinkers” to celebrate the works entering the public domain in 2020 as well as highlight the “elements of knowledge and creativity that are too important to a healthy society to lock down with copyright law.”

Public-Domain-Day-2020-v2

The program includes lightning talks on a variety of topics, such as bias in algorithms, shared cultural resources, and technological innovation. There will also be a panel discussion on “how the freedom to build upon creative works can inspire and move culture” and live performances by the Bob Schwartz Quartet! 

Location 

January 30, 2020 | 5:30-9:00pm American University Washington College of Law, Grossman Hall 4300 Nebraska Ave., NW, Washington, D.C. 20016

Program

  • 5:15 – Registration Opens
  • 5:30 – Facets of the Public Domain – Public Interest Organization Showcase and Reception (featuring the Bob Schwartz Quartet)
  • 6:30 – Realizing Access to the Public Domain 
  • 6:50 – Remixing the Public Domain
  • 7:15 – Too Important to be Protected: Limits on Copyright for a Healthy Society – Presentation by former MEP Julia Reda, followed by Lighting Talks
  • 8:30 – Reception: featuring the Bob Schwartz Quartet

Interested in joining us? Register here!

If you’re not able to attend, there will be a webcast available here starting from 6:30 PM EST on January 30, 2020!

The post Join Us in Washington D.C. to Celebrate Culture and Heritage on Public Domain Day appeared first on Creative Commons.

[Open letter to Donald Trump]

“On behalf of the undersigned national and regional library, research, publishing, and advocacy organizations, we are writing to express our commitment to ensuring that American taxpayers are guaranteed immediate, free, and unfettered access to the results of scientific research that their tax dollars support, and to encourage the Administration to support continued progress towards this shared goal. We strongly endorse updating existing U.S. policy to eliminate the current 12-month embargo period on articles reporting on publicly funded research, and to ensure that they are made immediately available under terms and conditions that allow their full reuse. To unlock the full value of our collective investment in science, the underlying data needed to validate an article’s conclusions, along with any corresponding software or code, should also be made immediately available….”

Introducing the CC Search Browser Extension

This is part of a series of posts introducing the projects built by open source contributors mentored by Creative Commons during Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2019. Mayank Nader was one of those contributors and we are grateful for his work on this project.

Creative Commons (CC) is working towards providing easy access to CC-licensed and public domain works. One significant step towards achieving that goal was the release of CC Search in 2019. Through this search and indexing tool, we’re making a plethora of CC-licensed images accessible in one place. As CC Search expands to include more than just images, CC is also developing a suite of applications and interfaces to help users across the world interact, consume, and reuse open access content.

CC Search Extension (1)

The CC Search Browser Extension is one such application. This browser extension is an open-source, lightweight plugin that can be installed and used by anyone with an updated web browser.

Why did we create this browser extension?

Browsers are the gateway to the web, and users often install browser plugins to improve productivity and overall experience. With the CC Search Browser Extension, users can now search for CC-licensed images, download them, and attribute the owner/creator without needing to head over to Flickr, Behance, Rawpixel or any other source of CC-licensed content. The other great feature? The CC Search Browser Extension works across different browsers, providing a familiar and intuitive experience for all users.

Key features of the CC Search Browser Extension: 

  • Search and filter CC-licensed content

You can use the extension filters to filter the content by the source website, types of licenses, and/or use-case.

CC Search Extension (2)

  • One-click attribution

One condition of all CC licenses is attribution. Attributing the owner/creator of CC-licensed content found using the extension is easy with one-click attribution. Both the Rich-text and HTML versions of the attribution are available.

CC Search Extension (3)

  • Download images (and attribution)

Download the image to use it in your works through the extension itself. You can also download the attribution information as a text file along with the image; this can be helpful when downloading multiple images in a single session.

  • Bookmark images

Bookmarking the images will save them in the extension. You can view and remove your bookmarks from the bookmarks section.

CC Search Extension (4)

  • Export and import bookmarks

As a user, you can easily archive and/or transfer your bookmarks. This feature makes sure that the process of archiving and transferring bookmarks is uncomplicated and straightforward.

CC Search Extension (5)

  • User-interface (UI) options available for custom settings

The extension also allows for setting default filters, etc. The “Options” page helps declutter the main popup of the extension, ensuring that it shows only the most necessary information. In the future, this “Options” page will also host additional and updated features.

CC Search Extension (6)

  • Sync your custom settings and bookmarks across devices

Chrome and Firefox have a built-in feature that syncs browser settings and preferences across your logged-in devices. The extension leverages this feature to sync your custom settings and bookmarks. This will make your experience more pleasant and familiar. 

  • Dark Mode

The extension also has a dark mode that you can toggle “on” by clicking the icon in the header. This reduces screen glare and battery consumption. You can set the dark mode as default in the “Options” page.

Future plans and development

  • Find and fix bugs
  • Add a review and feedback tab on the “Options” page
  • Integrate Vocabulary into the extension
  • Develop usability enhancements
  • Remove infinite scrolling and replace it with pagination or voluntary loading
  • Add search syntax for better specificity of results and a search syntax guide
  • Make the code more modular and add more tests
  • Port the features of the CC Search web application that are relevant in the context of the browser plugin

Installation

The latest version of the extension is available for installation via Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, and Opera.

Join the community

Community contribution and feedback is an essential part of the development process, so we encourage you to contact us if you have feedback or a specific suggestion. This is an open-source project, you can contribute in the form of bug reports, feature requests, or code contributions.

To install the development version of the extension, read the installation guide on Github.

Finally, come and tell us about your experience on the Creative Commons Slack via the slack channel: #cc-dev-browser-extension.

The post Introducing the CC Search Browser Extension appeared first on Creative Commons.

Introducing the CC Search Browser Extension

This is part of a series of posts introducing the projects built by open source contributors mentored by Creative Commons during Google Summer of Code (GSoC) 2019. Mayank Nader was one of those contributors and we are grateful for his work on this project.

Creative Commons (CC) is working towards providing easy access to CC-licensed and public domain works. One significant step towards achieving that goal was the release of CC Search in 2019. Through this search and indexing tool, we’re making a plethora of CC-licensed images accessible in one place. As CC Search expands to include more than just images, CC is also developing a suite of applications and interfaces to help users across the world interact, consume, and reuse open access content.

CC Search Extension (1)

The CC Search Browser Extension is one such application. This browser extension is an open-source, lightweight plugin that can be installed and used by anyone with an updated web browser.

Why did we create this browser extension?

Browsers are the gateway to the web, and users often install browser plugins to improve productivity and overall experience. With the CC Search Browser Extension, users can now search for CC-licensed images, download them, and attribute the owner/creator without needing to head over to Flickr, Behance, Rawpixel or any other source of CC-licensed content. The other great feature? The CC Search Browser Extension works across different browsers, providing a familiar and intuitive experience for all users.

Key features of the CC Search Browser Extension: 

  • Search and filter CC-licensed content

You can use the extension filters to filter the content by the source website, types of licenses, and/or use-case.

CC Search Extension (2)

  • One-click attribution

One condition of all CC licenses is attribution. Attributing the owner/creator of CC-licensed content found using the extension is easy with one-click attribution. Both the Rich-text and HTML versions of the attribution are available.

CC Search Extension (3)

  • Download images (and attribution)

Download the image to use it in your works through the extension itself. You can also download the attribution information as a text file along with the image; this can be helpful when downloading multiple images in a single session.

  • Bookmark images

Bookmarking the images will save them in the extension. You can view and remove your bookmarks from the bookmarks section.

CC Search Extension (4)

  • Export and import bookmarks

As a user, you can easily archive and/or transfer your bookmarks. This feature makes sure that the process of archiving and transferring bookmarks is uncomplicated and straightforward.

CC Search Extension (5)

  • User-interface (UI) options available for custom settings

The extension also allows for setting default filters, etc. The “Options” page helps declutter the main popup of the extension, ensuring that it shows only the most necessary information. In the future, this “Options” page will also host additional and updated features.

CC Search Extension (6)

  • Sync your custom settings and bookmarks across devices

Chrome and Firefox have a built-in feature that syncs browser settings and preferences across your logged-in devices. The extension leverages this feature to sync your custom settings and bookmarks. This will make your experience more pleasant and familiar. 

  • Dark Mode

The extension also has a dark mode that you can toggle “on” by clicking the icon in the header. This reduces screen glare and battery consumption. You can set the dark mode as default in the “Options” page.

Future plans and development

  • Find and fix bugs
  • Add a review and feedback tab on the “Options” page
  • Integrate Vocabulary into the extension
  • Develop usability enhancements
  • Remove infinite scrolling and replace it with pagination or voluntary loading
  • Add search syntax for better specificity of results and a search syntax guide
  • Make the code more modular and add more tests
  • Port the features of the CC Search web application that are relevant in the context of the browser plugin

Installation

The latest version of the extension is available for installation via Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, and Opera.

Join the community

Community contribution and feedback is an essential part of the development process, so we encourage you to contact us if you have feedback or a specific suggestion. This is an open-source project, you can contribute in the form of bug reports, feature requests, or code contributions.

To install the development version of the extension, read the installation guide on Github.

Finally, come and tell us about your experience on the Creative Commons Slack via the slack channel: #cc-dev-browser-extension.

The post Introducing the CC Search Browser Extension appeared first on Creative Commons.

Celebrate Public Domain Day with Events Around the World

The following is a guest post by Creative Commons community member Sebastiaan ter Burg.

In January 2020 there will be events all over the world to celebrate the fact that new works have entered the public domain. The country where a work is published determines when copyright expires. For example, where I’m from in the Netherlands, copyright vested in a work expires on the first day of January—70 years after the death of the work’s author. Meanwhile, works published in Mexico are copyrighted for a full 100 years after their death of their authors. That’s a long time! 

This is why we celebrate Public Domain Day, which happens on the first day of each year when new works enter the public domain. It’s a day to celebrate the lives of authors who died many years ago and whose works have finally become available to the world to access and use freely. Do you want to know if a Public Domain Day event is happening in your country? Or are you involved in the organization of an event in your country? Then head over to pdday.org to see where events are being held or to add your own event.

pdday.org is also a larger initiative to stimulate the publishing of works in the public domain. In addition to cataloguing events, the site aims to to collect practical tools and best practices for doing things like determining whether a work is in the public domain. The video below is an example of how cultural institutions in The Netherlands get training in determining public domain material in their collections.

I hope you’ll join us in celebrating Public Domain Day wherever you are in the world by attending an event, creating your own, or taking some time to learn about what the public domain is all about and why it’s important.

See also: Save the Date! Public Domain Day 2020 Is Happening in January in Washington, D.C.

The post Celebrate Public Domain Day with Events Around the World appeared first on Creative Commons.

Reproductions of Public Domain Works Should Remain in the Public Domain

It has come to the attention of Creative Commons that there is an increased use of CC licenses by cultural heritage institutions on photographic reproductions and 3D scans of objects such as sculptures, busts, engravings, and inscriptions, among others, that are indisputably in the public domain worldwide. A recent example is the 3000-year-old Nefertiti bust … Read More “Reproductions of Public Domain Works Should Remain in the Public Domain”

The post Reproductions of Public Domain Works Should Remain in the Public Domain appeared first on Creative Commons.

CC Names Cable Green as Interim CEO

Creative Commons is delighted to welcome Cable Green as the organization’s interim Chief Executive Officer. As we recently announced, Ryan Merkley has stepped down after five years of service as CEO to start a new position at Wikimedia. We are thankful to Ryan for his leadership at CC and excited for him and the Commons that he will continue as a leader in the open knowledge community.

Cable Green (Photo by Sebastiaan ter Burg, CC BY)

Interim CEO Cable Green has been a key member of the Creative Commons staff for the past eight and a half years. As CC’s Director of Open Education, he has been one of the world’s most effective advocates for open licensing policies, and has worked extensively with the global open education community to improve access to effective open educational resources. Cable will continue to spearhead our efforts to advance open education as he takes on this new interim leadership role at CC.

The rest of the Creative Commons board of directors and I are very grateful to Cable for stepping into this new role. He is the perfect person to lead CC during this crucial transition period. He knows and understands the organization, the community, and the important work we do better than anyone. We couldn’t be more confident in him and the rest of the CC staff.

We are also excited to announce that we have launched a CEO search process to identify our next permanent CEO. This process will include outreach to the global Creative Commons community for insights about the future of CC and its leadership.

The Commons is ever-changing and resilient. It is my great honor to cultivate it along with Creative Commons staff, our global network, and supporters.

Share alike, friends!

Molly Van Houweling Creative Commons Board Chair

The post CC Names Cable Green as Interim CEO appeared first on Creative Commons.

CC Names Cable Green as Interim CEO

Creative Commons is delighted to welcome Cable Green as the organization’s interim Chief Executive Officer. As we recently announced, Ryan Merkley has stepped down after five years of service as CEO to start a new position at Wikimedia. We are thankful to Ryan for his leadership at CC and excited for him and the Commons that he will continue as a leader in the open knowledge community.

Cable Green (Photo by Sebastiaan ter Burg, CC BY)

Interim CEO Cable Green has been a key member of the Creative Commons staff for the past eight and a half years. As CC’s Director of Open Education, he has been one of the world’s most effective advocates for open licensing policies, and has worked extensively with the global open education community to improve access to effective open educational resources. Cable will continue to spearhead our efforts to advance open education as he takes on this new interim leadership role at CC.

The rest of the Creative Commons board of directors and I are very grateful to Cable for stepping into this new role. He is the perfect person to lead CC during this crucial transition period. He knows and understands the organization, the community, and the important work we do better than anyone. We couldn’t be more confident in him and the rest of the CC staff.

We are also excited to announce that we have launched a CEO search process to identify our next permanent CEO. This process will include outreach to the global Creative Commons community for insights about the future of CC and its leadership.

The Commons is ever-changing and resilient. It is my great honor to cultivate it along with Creative Commons staff, our global network, and supporters.

Share alike, friends!

Molly Van Houweling Creative Commons Board Chair

The post CC Names Cable Green as Interim CEO appeared first on Creative Commons.

Open Science in Switzerland: Opportunities and Challenges | 2019 | Publication | Sciences Switzerland

“The factsheet addresses the scientific community, science organisations and decisionmakers. Key recommendations concern the promotion of Open Access schemes to disseminate scientific results as widely as possible, alternative cooperation and financing models for scientists and publishers, publishing under Creative Commons (CC) licenses, reward mechanisms for Open Access publications and data management work as well as issues related to data storage.

This factsheet will be presented at a panel discussion on Friday, 13 September, in the House of Academies. Participants: Rafael Ball (ETH Library), Daniel Marty (Swiss Journal of Geosciences), Sabine Süsstrunk (EPF Lausanne) and Franck Vazquez (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute MDPI)….”

2019:GLAM/Public Domain Awareness Project: enhancing use of CC’s Public Domain tools to serve the needs of GLAM institutions and reusers – Wikimania

“Making assessments about the copyright status of a work remains a challenge notwithstanding the tools that CC has developed over the years, such as the Public Domain Mark and CC0. It is also hard to communicate to end users about the laws that apply to their particular use of a work. Copyright is jurisdiction based, which means each country has their own copyright and public domain rules. These differing laws presents challenges for digitizers of content and reusers of digital online surrogates.

Several efforts and projects offer partial solutions for these challenges; however they tend to serve single jurisdiction or regional needs, are loosely coordinated, and are not integrated into a unified solution that works starting from the moment of digitization and continuing through to the public that encounters them over the Internet. Ideally, the public domain is the easiest part of the knowledge commons to assess and reuse, but the current environment makes it challenging at each stage in the process of getting that content to a public.

Creative Commons and other key stakeholders such as Wikimedia brought forth this Project for initial discussion with our community and stakeholders at the CC 2019 Global Summit in Lisbon. The outcomes of the 4 hours session at the Summit can be found here.

At this session, we expect to be able to follow on some of the data modelling challenges in relationship with the Help:Copyrights page on Wikidata. We want to gather feedback and input from the community that is working in the intersection of GLAM institutions and Wikidata.

Creative Commons will bring some of its legal expertise on copyright and open licensing, and we expect to engage more with the Wikidata community to leverage the different languages and community needs, and better refine our initial project….”