CC Names Cable Green as Interim CEO

Creative Commons is delighted to welcome Cable Green as the organization’s interim Chief Executive Officer. As we recently announced, Ryan Merkley has stepped down after five years of service as CEO to start a new position at Wikimedia. We are thankful to Ryan for his leadership at CC and excited for him and the Commons that he will continue as a leader in the open knowledge community.

Cable Green (Photo by Sebastiaan ter Burg, CC BY)

Interim CEO Cable Green has been a key member of the Creative Commons staff for the past eight and a half years. As CC’s Director of Open Education, he has been one of the world’s most effective advocates for open licensing policies, and has worked extensively with the global open education community to improve access to effective open educational resources. Cable will continue to spearhead our efforts to advance open education as he takes on this new interim leadership role at CC.

The rest of the Creative Commons board of directors and I are very grateful to Cable for stepping into this new role. He is the perfect person to lead CC during this crucial transition period. He knows and understands the organization, the community, and the important work we do better than anyone. We couldn’t be more confident in him and the rest of the CC staff.

We are also excited to announce that we have launched a CEO search process to identify our next permanent CEO. This process will include outreach to the global Creative Commons community for insights about the future of CC and its leadership.

The Commons is ever-changing and resilient. It is my great honor to cultivate it along with Creative Commons staff, our global network, and supporters.

Share alike, friends!

Molly Van Houweling Creative Commons Board Chair

The post CC Names Cable Green as Interim CEO appeared first on Creative Commons.

CC Names Cable Green as Interim CEO

Creative Commons is delighted to welcome Cable Green as the organization’s interim Chief Executive Officer. As we recently announced, Ryan Merkley has stepped down after five years of service as CEO to start a new position at Wikimedia. We are thankful to Ryan for his leadership at CC and excited for him and the Commons that he will continue as a leader in the open knowledge community.

Cable Green (Photo by Sebastiaan ter Burg, CC BY)

Interim CEO Cable Green has been a key member of the Creative Commons staff for the past eight and a half years. As CC’s Director of Open Education, he has been one of the world’s most effective advocates for open licensing policies, and has worked extensively with the global open education community to improve access to effective open educational resources. Cable will continue to spearhead our efforts to advance open education as he takes on this new interim leadership role at CC.

The rest of the Creative Commons board of directors and I are very grateful to Cable for stepping into this new role. He is the perfect person to lead CC during this crucial transition period. He knows and understands the organization, the community, and the important work we do better than anyone. We couldn’t be more confident in him and the rest of the CC staff.

We are also excited to announce that we have launched a CEO search process to identify our next permanent CEO. This process will include outreach to the global Creative Commons community for insights about the future of CC and its leadership.

The Commons is ever-changing and resilient. It is my great honor to cultivate it along with Creative Commons staff, our global network, and supporters.

Share alike, friends!

Molly Van Houweling Creative Commons Board Chair

The post CC Names Cable Green as Interim CEO appeared first on Creative Commons.

Open Science in Switzerland: Opportunities and Challenges | 2019 | Publication | Sciences Switzerland

“The factsheet addresses the scientific community, science organisations and decisionmakers. Key recommendations concern the promotion of Open Access schemes to disseminate scientific results as widely as possible, alternative cooperation and financing models for scientists and publishers, publishing under Creative Commons (CC) licenses, reward mechanisms for Open Access publications and data management work as well as issues related to data storage.

This factsheet will be presented at a panel discussion on Friday, 13 September, in the House of Academies. Participants: Rafael Ball (ETH Library), Daniel Marty (Swiss Journal of Geosciences), Sabine Süsstrunk (EPF Lausanne) and Franck Vazquez (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute MDPI)….”

2019:GLAM/Public Domain Awareness Project: enhancing use of CC’s Public Domain tools to serve the needs of GLAM institutions and reusers – Wikimania

“Making assessments about the copyright status of a work remains a challenge notwithstanding the tools that CC has developed over the years, such as the Public Domain Mark and CC0. It is also hard to communicate to end users about the laws that apply to their particular use of a work. Copyright is jurisdiction based, which means each country has their own copyright and public domain rules. These differing laws presents challenges for digitizers of content and reusers of digital online surrogates.

Several efforts and projects offer partial solutions for these challenges; however they tend to serve single jurisdiction or regional needs, are loosely coordinated, and are not integrated into a unified solution that works starting from the moment of digitization and continuing through to the public that encounters them over the Internet. Ideally, the public domain is the easiest part of the knowledge commons to assess and reuse, but the current environment makes it challenging at each stage in the process of getting that content to a public.

Creative Commons and other key stakeholders such as Wikimedia brought forth this Project for initial discussion with our community and stakeholders at the CC 2019 Global Summit in Lisbon. The outcomes of the 4 hours session at the Summit can be found here.

At this session, we expect to be able to follow on some of the data modelling challenges in relationship with the Help:Copyrights page on Wikidata. We want to gather feedback and input from the community that is working in the intersection of GLAM institutions and Wikidata.

Creative Commons will bring some of its legal expertise on copyright and open licensing, and we expect to engage more with the Wikidata community to leverage the different languages and community needs, and better refine our initial project….”

Freies Wissen: EU-Kommission stellt ihre Publikationen unter offene Lizenzen – netzpolitik.org

From Google’s English: “The EU Commission places its contents under Creative Commons licenses and supports the organization in the translation of license texts. She is thus ahead of the federal government with a good role model….

Since the beginning of this year, many contents and publications of the EU Commission have been standardized under two Creative Commons licenses. Both allow a largely free use of such content, which can now virtually arbitrarily remix, pass on and commercially reuse.

At the end of February, the EU Commission announced that it would place most of the knowledge it produced under a “CC BY 4.0” license . Therefore, everyone is free to share, modify and use such content for any purpose as long as the author is named. For metadata, raw data and “other documents of a similar nature”, the EU Commission even goes one step further and places it under the even more liberal CC public domain license ….”

Freies Wissen: EU-Kommission stellt ihre Publikationen unter offene Lizenzen – netzpolitik.org

From Google’s English: “The EU Commission places its contents under Creative Commons licenses and supports the organization in the translation of license texts. She is thus ahead of the federal government with a good role model….

Since the beginning of this year, many contents and publications of the EU Commission have been standardized under two Creative Commons licenses. Both allow a largely free use of such content, which can now virtually arbitrarily remix, pass on and commercially reuse.

At the end of February, the EU Commission announced that it would place most of the knowledge it produced under a “CC BY 4.0” license . Therefore, everyone is free to share, modify and use such content for any purpose as long as the author is named. For metadata, raw data and “other documents of a similar nature”, the EU Commission even goes one step further and places it under the even more liberal CC public domain license ….”

Navigating 21st-Century Digital Scholarship: Open Educational Resources (OERs), Creative Commons, Copyright, and Library Vendor Licenses: The Serials Librarian: Vol 0, No 0

Abstract:  Digital scholarship issues are increasingly prevalent in today’s environment. We are faced with questions of how to protect our own works as well as others’ with responsible attribution and usage, sometimes involving a formal agreement. These may come in the form of Creative Commons Licensing, provisions of the U.S. Copyright Act, or terms of use outlined by contractual agreements with library vendors. Librarians at Eastern Carolina University and Kansas State University (K-State) are among several university libraries now providing services to assist with navigating these sometimes legalistic frameworks. East Carolina University Libraries are taking initiatives to familiarize faculty, researchers, and students with Open Educational Resources and Creative Commons Licensing. At K-State, librarians in digital scholarship and electronic resources identified the overlap of their subject matters through their correspondence regarding users’ copyright and licensing questions; a partnership formed, and they implemented a proactive and public-facing approach to better meet user needs and liability concerns at a major research university.

Join us for a Twitter chat! | Creative Commons USA

Next month, Creative Commons USA is hosting a Twitter chat in partnership with the Open Textbook Network, Rebus Community, Collaborative Knowledge Foundation, and Library Publishing Coalition around open licensing, CC, copyright, and other intellectual property issues.

We’re inviting practitioners from across the spectrum to join our experts – including Michael Carroll, a founding member of Creative Commons, currently a Professor of Law and the Director of the Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property, and Meredith Jacob, Public Lead for Creative Commons USA. Ethan Senack, Outreach and Policy Manager for Creative Commons USA (@esenack) will be moderating….”

Is it possible to decolonize the Commons? An interview with Jane Anderson of Local Contexts – Creative Commons

“Joining us at the Creative Commons Global Summit in 2018, NYU professor and legal scholar Jane Anderson presented the collaborative project “Local Contexts,” “an initiative to support Native, First Nations, Aboriginal, Inuit, Metis and Indigenous communities in the management of their intellectual property and cultural heritage specifically within the digital environment.” The wide-ranging panel touched on the need for practical strategies for Indigenous communities to reclaim their rights and assert sovereignty over their own intellectual property….

How can we have an open movement that works for everyone, not only the most powerful? How have power structures historically worked against Indigenous communities, and how can the Creative Commons community work to change this historic inequality?

Jane Anderson discussed these issues as well as some of her more recent work with the Passamaquoddy Tribe in Maine with Creative Commons….”

 

A Grand Re-Opening of the Public Domain

Co-hosted by the Internet Archive and Creative Commons, this celebration will feature a keynote addresses by Lawrence Lessig and Cory Doctorow, lightning talks, demos, multimedia displays and more to mark the “re-opening” of the public domain in the United States. The event will take place at the Internet Archive in San Francisco….”