2020 top trends in academic libraries: A review of the trends and issues affecting academic libraries in higher education | Research Planning and Review Committee | College & Research Libraries News

“Open access: Transitions and transformations

The past few years have brought major developments in the OA landscape—from major big deal cancellations to new agreements between libraries and publishers. Following the University of California system’s Elsevier cancellation in early 2019,16 the University of North Carolina announced in late 2019 that their license renewal negotiations with Elsevier will continue into 2020.17 Resources for institutions considering this route include SPARC’s “Big Deal Knowledge Base and Big Deal Cancellation Tracking,”18 University of California’s “Negotiating with Scholarly Journal Publishers Toolkit,”19 “Guidelines for Evaluating Transformative Open Access Agreements,”20 and “Guide to Transitioning Journals to Open Access Publishing.”21

Many new transformative agreements were announced between publishers and libraries or library consortia over the past year.22 A transformative agreement can be defined as a contract seeking “to shift the contracted payment from a library or group of libraries to a publisher away from subscription-based reading and towards open access publishing.”23 There are various flavors, including offsetting agreements, read-and-publish agreements, and publish-and-read agreements. Since 2018, many read-and-publish agreements have been signed between publishers and institutions.

After hundreds of responses from publishers, academic libraries, and researchers, cOALition S made some changes to its Plan S, which “aims for full and immediate Open Access to peer-reviewed scholarly publications from research funded by public and private grants.”24 Noteworthy differences: plan implementation is delayed to 2021, no cap on the cost of OA publication, tweaked rules around hybrid titles and transformative agreements, ignore the prestige of journals when making funding decisions, and more restrictive open licenses will be allowed when approved by the funder.25

Further transitions are happening at the society publishing level. The group Transitioning Society Publications to Open Access (TSPOA) formed at the October 2018 Choosing Pathways to OA Working forum. They “aim to provide relevant resources/experience working in collaboration with society publishing partners to help them develop an open access publishing model that is appropriate, effective and sustainable.”26 …”

IRUS-UK Newsletter, June 2020

“IRUS-UK collects raw usage data from UK Institutional Repositories (IRs) and processes these data into COUNTERconformant statistics. This provides repositories with comparable, authoritative, standards-based data and opportunities for profiling at a national level. The IRUS-UK service is a community-driven development, responding to user needs….

In response to your feedback, the current Shibboleth authorisation mechanism will be removed so that the IRUS web portal is fully open and supports easier access to data and tools….”

News & Views: Open Access is not just for Open Access Journals – Delta Think

“We can also use this break-out to assess what might happen if hybrid journals flipped. Assuming submissions stay constant, the currently Paid Access proportion gives us our maximum additional APC-based income. The economics of the Public Access content depend on how much the market would pay to flip the license to an open access one given the content is already free to read. Pressure to reduce subscription prices (and even flip to OA) could be determined by adding the open and public access components, as neither require subscriptions. At a little over 20%, this is not insignificant….

Perhaps the most surprising finding in content outside fully OA journals, is that journals with no OA option make proportionally more content Open Access and Public Access than their hybrid counterparts….

Literature search strategies focus on finding articles, and so looking at per-article access options is useful and relevant for researchers. Here we see that the proportion of content that is Open Access and Public Access is growing, although the growth appears to be slowing….

Across the market as a whole, it seems that you are LESS likely to find OA content in a hybrid journal which offers OA options, than in a journal with no advertised OA options at all.”

News & Views: Open Access is not just for Open Access Journals – Delta Think

“We can also use this break-out to assess what might happen if hybrid journals flipped. Assuming submissions stay constant, the currently Paid Access proportion gives us our maximum additional APC-based income. The economics of the Public Access content depend on how much the market would pay to flip the license to an open access one given the content is already free to read. Pressure to reduce subscription prices (and even flip to OA) could be determined by adding the open and public access components, as neither require subscriptions. At a little over 20%, this is not insignificant….

Perhaps the most surprising finding in content outside fully OA journals, is that journals with no OA option make proportionally more content Open Access and Public Access than their hybrid counterparts….

Literature search strategies focus on finding articles, and so looking at per-article access options is useful and relevant for researchers. Here we see that the proportion of content that is Open Access and Public Access is growing, although the growth appears to be slowing….

Across the market as a whole, it seems that you are LESS likely to find OA content in a hybrid journal which offers OA options, than in a journal with no advertised OA options at all.”

Redux Online Webinar – “Open Access: Sales – Open Access Business Models for Books and Journals”

“Building upon strong bases of support, consortium or subscriber-funded projects seek to open content, like invited review articles not suitable for APC charges, or even to flip entire disciplines. Other new initiatives see grant or government funding as the best way to get new regional projects off the ground….”

The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Elsevier announce new publishing partnership

“The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) and Elsevier, a global information analytics business specializing in science and health, are delighted to announce a new partnership to publish the ASBMB’s Journal of Biological Chemistry (JBC), Molecular & Cellular Proteomics (MCP) and Journal of Lipid Research (JLR). As part of this agreement, all three titles will move to a gold open access (OA) publishing model, making articles immediately and permanently available for everyone to read, download, copy and distribute. The journals will be hosted on Elsevier’s leading online platform, ScienceDirect, beginning January 1, 2021….

Elsevier’s experience transitioning journals to gold open access was a key factor in their selection….”

ASBMB journals move to open access

“The ASBMB [American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology] is pleased to announce that the society’s three highly regarded journals — Journal of Biological Chemistry, Molecular & Cellular Proteomics and Journal of Lipid Research — will be fully open access beginning in January 2021….”

Annual Review of Political Science uses Subscribe to Open to publish 2020 volume open access

Nonprofit publisher Annual Reviews is pleased to announce that the 2020 volume of the Annual Review of Political Science has been converted from gated to open access, with all articles published under a CC BY license. The back volumes, dating from 1998, are now freely available. The Annual Review of Political Science is the third of five journals included in a 2020 pilot program for Subscribe to Open.

For further information or to set up an interview, contact Liz Allen, Director of MarCom and Strategic Development at Annual Reviews (lallen@annualreviews.org). 

 

TagTeam :: Annual Review of Public Health uses Subscribe to Open to publish 2020 volume open accessGet started as a tagger – Harvard Open Access Project – peter.suber’s bookmarks – Open Access Tracking Project (OATP)

Nonprofit publisher Annual Reviews is pleased to announce that the 2020 volume of the Annual Review of Political Science has been converted from gated to open access, with all articles published under a CC BY license. The back volumes, dating from 1998, are now freely available. The Annual Review of Political Science is the third of five journals included in a 2020 pilot program for Subscribe to Open.

For further information or to set up an interview, contact Liz Allen, Director of MarCom and Strategic Development at Annual Reviews (lallen@annualreviews.org).