Gold and Diamond open access journals landscape – Research Consulting

“The dashboard uses the dataset produced by Walt Crawford on OA journals (GOAJ), which is based on DOAJ data but with added information, for instance on the number of articles published and the types of publishers. Recently, the dataset has been updated with 2019 data and its results are extensively described in the book Gold Open Access 2014-2019.

The purpose of this dashboard is to stimulate usage of this dataset, as this is a resource which is, in our view, currently underused by the Scholarly Communication community. The dashboard is fully interactive and clickable, and, with the Ctrl key, it is possible to click several items simultaneously. With the symbol in the bottom right corner, it is possible to enlarge the dashboard for greater visibility (as circled in red below)….

The majority of OA titles are Diamond, but the number of articles published by Diamond journals is levelling off…

Diamond more titles, Gold more articles: Of the 13939 OA journal titles, over 70% of them are Diamond. However, most articles (>60%) are published by Gold journals.
Gold grows, Diamond levels off: The number of articles published by Gold journals is growing rapidly, while the number of articles published by Diamond journals is levelling off. The number of newly started Diamond journals has also been declining since 2013.

Prominence of Diamond differs dependent on subject…

SSH: In the Social Sciences and Humanities, Diamond journals are predominant, publishing more than three quarters of articles.
Biomedicine: The number of Gold and Diamond journals in Biomedicine is about the same but Gold journals publish many more articles.
Science: In Science, there are more Diamond than Gold journals but Gold journals publish many more articles….”

International open access practices: Strategies beyond the APC model

“Increasingly, the governments and private organizations which fund research are mandating that the research outputs they support are made available as open access content. These efforts are impacting both established and growing efforts to share research widely.

This panel discussion will feature four presentations that address how large-scale developments in open access, particularly in regard to those emphasizing the article processing charge (APC) model, are impacting or influencing other programs which enhance access to scholarly content under different models. A Question and Answer session will follow.

The events speakers will discuss the Open Library of Humanities, research database integration of open access content in Iran, an overview of the open access mandates and policies of Latin American countries, and the Research4Life program.”

Library Publishing Pain Points – Funding | Library Publishing Coalition

“Operating a non-commercial, scholar-led open access publishing program through our library is intensely rewarding work. On a daily basis we connect with motivated and resourceful editors and scholars, who are deeply committed to open scholarship and to enriching the commons. Each new issue published on our platform feels like a small victory for our team, and we know what we’re doing is meaningful, not just to our small community, but also to all the invisible readers who come across our content and engage with it in some way. However, this work also comes with its own set of complex challenges and thorny issues.

Our program is provided at no cost to eligible Canadian open access scholarly journals and we wholly fund the staffing and infrastructure of the program through our library’s operating budget. Our institution has elected to do this, rather than charge service fees, as an effort to reduce one of the many barriers to publishing that small scholarly associations face. We’ve also chosen to take a strong stance against charging APCs or submission fees at the University of Alberta, and one condition of participating in our program is that our journals do not charge fees to authors. While we believe this model benefits both journals and their communities, this lack of externally generated revenue comes with predictable challenges around resource constraints….

Within our no-fee model, we simply cannot offer these services to the 70 journals that we publish and instead, we grudgingly off-load the problem to our editorial teams, who must immediately face this issue when they join our program. Finding revenue to fund some of the operational elements of their journal production, without resorting to subscriptions or APCs, is a constant pain point for all of us….”

NWO grant for the Open Library for Humanities

“The Open Library for Humanities (OLH) has received a three-year grant for the Library Partnership Subsidy system. OLH is an academic Open Access platform without costs for the authors who publish there.

NWO is deeply committed to Open Access and is dedicated to realising this transition. The sustainable funding of digital infrastructures is essential in this regard. NWO tries to contribute to that where possible. Today, NWO will announce that it is entering a three-year partnership with the Open Library for Humanities. OLH is high-quality Open Access platform in the humanities….”

1000 papers published in JOSS | Journal of Open Source Software Blog

“Today we reached a huge milestone at JOSS – we published our 1000th paper! JOSS is a developer friendly, free-to-publish, open-access journal for research software packages. Publishing 1000 papers (and reviewing the corresponding 1000 software packages) over the past ~4 years has been no small feat. This achievement has been possible thanks to the efforts of our journal team and community of reviewers who have all given their time to make JOSS a success. We take this opportunity to review some of what we’ve learnt over the past four years and outline some plans for the future….”

Two Steps Forward, One Step Back – The Pandemic’s Impact on Open Access Progress – The Scholarly Kitchen

“2019 was a watershed year for progress in the transition of research publishing to open access (OA). The shakeup caused by Plan S had some time to sink in, cancellations of big subscription deals ramped up, and as I noted last October, the conversation had shifted from “eventually things will move to OA,” to instead a sense of urgency, “we’re on the clock for a move to OA.” The value of open science (increased transparency, open data, open access to research results) has become increasingly obvious during the current global health crisis. Both the positives (rapid reporting and sharing of information) and the negatives (the glut of bad science being issued as preprints and promoted via mainstream media without proper curation) are now evident, with the good generally outweighing the bad. Despite the daily evidence of the importance of shifting to an open science environment for research, the economic fallout from the pandemic is going to make necessary progress difficult and slow….

Business models beyond the APC may have an even bigger struggle ahead. Because of the many shortcomings of the APC model, a variety of OA business models that can be applied in different contexts and that are appropriate for each community and research field are needed for long-term sustainability. Right now, most of the non-APC models in-play rely upon voluntary spend from someone. Will the cost paid for publication of a Diamond-OA journal out of a library make the cut when budgets are being slashed? Collective action strategies that rely upon libraries voluntarily paying for memberships or subscribe-to-open models are going to be similarly hard to justify, given that you receive all the same benefits of the model whether or not you choose to pay….

Open access relies on the concept that knowledge is a public good, but acknowledges that there are costs and efforts necessary to produce and maintain that public good. The global health crisis has the potential to bring stakeholders together in support of improving the way we communicate research results, but the accompanying economic downturn may create significant roadblocks to those efforts.”

Accelerating open science in physics | Research Information

“Some argue there is enough money in the system to afford a transition to open access. Whether this is the case or not, there is no current solution or global plan in place to adjust the allocation and flow of funding so it resides at the levels exactly commensurate to where research is produced. These are not intractable challenges. But they require global consensus on the goal of open science, coordinated action to build the infrastructure, and incentives to create lasting change. This will take time….

Although Covid-19 might have reinforced the value of open science, its benefits are well understood by many in the physics community, and we are a long-standing proponent. But there is still much work for all involved if we are to transition to a fully and sustainably open landscape in physics and beyond.

To that end, we will maintain an open dialogue with the physical scientists and scientific organisations we serve and continue to seek more insight into what’s specifically important to them. Over the coming year we will engage in a series of projects to speak to the global physical science community so we can contribute to more open science – more ‘open physics’ – and we look forward to reporting back.”

Accelerating open science in physics | Research Information

“Some argue there is enough money in the system to afford a transition to open access. Whether this is the case or not, there is no current solution or global plan in place to adjust the allocation and flow of funding so it resides at the levels exactly commensurate to where research is produced. These are not intractable challenges. But they require global consensus on the goal of open science, coordinated action to build the infrastructure, and incentives to create lasting change. This will take time….

Although Covid-19 might have reinforced the value of open science, its benefits are well understood by many in the physics community, and we are a long-standing proponent. But there is still much work for all involved if we are to transition to a fully and sustainably open landscape in physics and beyond.

To that end, we will maintain an open dialogue with the physical scientists and scientific organisations we serve and continue to seek more insight into what’s specifically important to them. Over the coming year we will engage in a series of projects to speak to the global physical science community so we can contribute to more open science – more ‘open physics’ – and we look forward to reporting back.”

Diamond Open Access study commissioned by cOAlition S – News Service

“Please, help us get to know the open access journals and platforms that are free for readers and authors.

We are pleased to invite you to fill in a survey dedicated to gaining in-depth understanding of open access journals that don’t charge author-fees, often known as the “diamond model”; journals that are free to both readers and authors.

This survey is part of the Diamond Open Access Study commissioned by cOAlition S and intends to explore and deepen our understanding of collaborative non-commercial publishing models for Open Access.

We need to assess the depth and breadth of OA diamond offerings across the globe, and we need to make the case for this kind of OA if we are to gain stronger support from funders.

The survey will be open until the 25th of August 2020….”

Diamond Open Access study commissioned by cOAlition S – News Service

“Please, help us get to know the open access journals and platforms that are free for readers and authors.

We are pleased to invite you to fill in a survey dedicated to gaining in-depth understanding of open access journals that don’t charge author-fees, often known as the “diamond model”; journals that are free to both readers and authors.

This survey is part of the Diamond Open Access Study commissioned by cOAlition S and intends to explore and deepen our understanding of collaborative non-commercial publishing models for Open Access.

We need to assess the depth and breadth of OA diamond offerings across the globe, and we need to make the case for this kind of OA if we are to gain stronger support from funders.

The survey will be open until the 25th of August 2020….”