Just One Giant Lab – Learning and Solving Together

“Just One Giant Lab (JOGL) is the first research and innovation laboratory operating as a distributed, open and massive mobilisation platform for collaborative task solving. JOGL helps humanity to sync onto fixing our most urgent and important problems using Open Science, Responsible Innovation and Continuous Learning. JOGL partners with academic labs, companies, startups, foundations, NGOs and public services to create participatory research programs for understanding and solving Health, Environmental, Social and Humanitarian issues….

Come challenge yourself by fostering humanity’s open knowledge and developing solutions to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG’s) defined by the United Nations!…

By making the process of contributing to solving important challenges accessible and valorizing for anyone, we want to multiply the number of contributors by 10 (from 5 millions to 50 millions) in 10 years, while making all produced knowledge, tools and methodologies universally open for use and adaptation….”

Open Scholarship as a mechanism for the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

Abstract:  Traditional methods of scholarly publishing and communication are ineffective in meeting the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has demonstrated that, in times of need, the global research community can activate and pool its knowledge and resources to collaborate on solving problems. The use of innovative Web-based technologies, including open source software, data-sharing archives, open collaboration methods, and the liberation of thousands of relevant research articles from proprietary sources show us that the fundamental components of a fully open system are readily available, technologically efficient and cost-effective. If we are to achieve the SDGs by 2030, systematic reform and explicit adoption of open scholarship strategies at scale is necessary. We propose that the United Nations and parallel entities take a position of leadership by creating or funding an organisation or federated alliance of organisations to implement these reforms.

The Global Impact of Open Access and How Academic Libraries Can Help Shape It

“Join us on Monday March 16th at 8 a.m. ET for the third of a four-part webinar series organized by Cornell University Library that brings together librarians and thought leaders around the world to address the challenges outlined by the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals.

“The Global Impact of Open Access and How Academic Libraries Can Help Shape It” will focus on how Open Access repositories can contribute to work being done in furtherance of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, and how academic libraries can help best support these endeavors….”

Open Science for the implementation of the UN 2030 Agenda

“The background: The first United Nations Open Science Conference was organized by the UN Dag Hammarskjöld Library in collaboration with the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) in November 19, 2019 in the UN Headquarters in New York. The theme of the conference, “Towards Global Open Science: Core Enabler of the UN 2030 Agenda”,  aimed into elevating the discussion about open science and open research to the global level and to examine the role of open science in advancing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. 

The conference brought together representatives of open science initiatives from around the world (OpenAIRE, Hindawi, LA Referencia, Scielo, AfricanLII and others), early career researchers, library directors and policymakers….”

Open Science for the implementation of the UN 2030 Agenda

“The background: The first United Nations Open Science Conference was organized by the UN Dag Hammarskjöld Library in collaboration with the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) in November 19, 2019 in the UN Headquarters in New York. The theme of the conference, “Towards Global Open Science: Core Enabler of the UN 2030 Agenda”,  aimed into elevating the discussion about open science and open research to the global level and to examine the role of open science in advancing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. 

The conference brought together representatives of open science initiatives from around the world (OpenAIRE, Hindawi, LA Referencia, Scielo, AfricanLII and others), early career researchers, library directors and policymakers….”

Lancet editor-in-chief calls for ‘activist’ journals | Times Higher Education (THE)

“Academic journals must become more “activist” if they are to survive, seeking to “change the direction of society” rather than “passively waiting” for manuscripts, according to the editor-in-chief of The Lancet.

The medical journal is one of a number of titles now explicitly committed to helping pursue the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which range from eradicating hunger to reducing inequalities, as titles try to carve out a new role in a world where publishing has moved online….

Instead of “sitting in our office passively waiting for manuscripts to be submitted to the journal”, Dr Horton said, The Lancet, founded in 1823, now had a mission to “gather the very best scientific evidence, [and] to then think strategically about how that evidence fits within the overall trajectory of scientific and political policy in the world”.

For example, last year the journal published a report setting out how to eradicate malaria by 2050, backed by research funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

This was one of dozens of “commissions” initiated by the journal, which bring together experts to formulate proposals on subjects ranging from defeating Alzheimer’s disease to reforming medical education for the 21st century….

Still, some journals have faced long-standing criticism that their subscription costs mean they are unaffordable for readers in developing countries – or conversely, that the price of publishing an open-access article excludes scholars from poorer university systems.

Some publishers offer discounts to academics in poorer countries. The Lancet, for example, waives open-access publishing fees for scholars whose main funder is based in a state with a low human development index….”

NGOs’ experiences of navigating the open… | F1000Research

Abstract:  Grant-led consortia working in the global development sector rely on the input of local and national non-government organisations in low- and middle-income countries. However, the open access mandates and mechanisms embedded within grants and promoted by funders and publishers are designed almost exclusively with large universities and research institutions in mind. Experiences from the consortium of health research non-government organisations comprising the Communicable Diseases Health Service Delivery research programme show that implementing open access mandates is not as simple or frictionless as it initially appears.

 

NGOs’ experiences of navigating the open… | F1000Research

Abstract:  Grant-led consortia working in the global development sector rely on the input of local and national non-government organisations in low- and middle-income countries. However, the open access mandates and mechanisms embedded within grants and promoted by funders and publishers are designed almost exclusively with large universities and research institutions in mind. Experiences from the consortium of health research non-government organisations comprising the Communicable Diseases Health Service Delivery research programme show that implementing open access mandates is not as simple or frictionless as it initially appears.

 

Digital Bangladesh: How Research Data Defines Development – The Scholarly Kitchen

“Before the 2008 general election, the political party Bangladesh Awami League proposed a concept called the ‘Vision 2021’ in its election manifesto. As the party assumed power in 2009, the vision was translated into a perspective plan for 2010?2021. Both the vision and the plan envisaged Bangladesh becoming a middle-income country by 2021 – the year the nation will celebrate 50 years of independence. It was further realized that ICT-based economic development would be a crucial aspect of attaining that vision. That insight led into the idea of a ‘Digital Bangladesh’ and allowed plans, resources and execution to make it real.

Ten years on, Bangladesh’s digitalization has now evolved through numerous avenues. Four paths, however, remain at the core. The first is to prepare the citizens to capitalize on the amazing opportunities the ICT sector has to offer, through many capacity development initiatives. Bangladesh has 16% of the world’s online workers, which ranks it second in the world following India (24%). A report suggests there are about half a million active ICT freelancers, together earning US$ 100 million per year….”