Open Development Cambodia (ODC)

The Open Development Network is also creating a complex ecosystem of partners from local to global levels, across sectors, to contribute data, linkages, and technical expertise to the Open Development platform. EWMI-ODI facilitates dialogue and cooperation between and among nodes of the Open Development Network in order to support an intended long-term collaboration, to enable crowdsourcing and dispersed content development, based on needed expertise and commitment to a common approach. …”

 

Open Development Mekong | Sharing information about Mekong and its development with the world.

The Open Development Network is also creating a complex ecosystem of partners from local to global levels, across sectors, to contribute data, linkages, and technical expertise to the Open Development platform. EWMI-ODI facilitates dialogue and cooperation between and among nodes of the Open Development Network in order to support an intended long-term collaboration, to enable crowdsourcing and dispersed content development, based on needed expertise and commitment to a common approach. …”

Open Data in Developing Economies

“Recent years have witnessed considerable speculation about the potential of open data to bring about wide-scale transformation. The bulk of existing evidence about the impact of open data, however, focuses on high-income countries. Much less is known about open data’s role and value in low- and middle-income countries, and more generally about its possible contributions to economic and social development. The field lacks a coherent Theory of Change for how and in what contexts open data supports or hampers development.”

Joint COAR-UNESCO Statement on Open Access (May 9, 2016)

“Some organizations are promoting a large-scale shift from subscriptions to open access via article processing charges (APC’s). However, there are a number of issues that need to be addressed in this model:

[1] Consider institutions with smaller budgets and developing countries. Authors will be unable to publish once limited funds have been exhausted. Such a system will need to support researchers who cannot pay APCs – to avoid further skewing a scholarly publishing system that is already biased against the research undertaken in certain disciplines and countries.

[2] Avoid further concentration in the international publishing industry. A flip to APCs will further consolidate the large-scale monopoly of the international publishing industry. In the current system, the five largest publishers publish over 50% of the research papers produced. A mere shift towards the pay-to-publish model will institutionalize the influence of these companies, and discourage new entrants and models other than APC models.

[3] Explore ways to reduce costs. Recent studies indicate that, at current APC costs, there would be a buffer of minimum 40% when subscriptions would be transferred to an open access model. New models should build in mechanisms that ensure cost reductions. Globally, we are already paying billions of Euros/Dollars per year on subscription access to journals. Simply shifting payments to support APCs may lead to higher systemic costs, curb innovation, and inhibit the scholarly community’s ability to take advantage of new models and tools….”

Research on Open Educational Resources for Development (ROER4D)

“The Research on Open Educational Resources for Development (ROER4D) project aims to provide evidence-based research from a number of countries in South America, Sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia. The primary objective of the programme is to improve educational policy, practice, and research in developing countries by better understanding the use and impact of OER….”

Research on Open Educational Resources for Development (ROER4D)

“The Research on Open Educational Resources for Development (ROER4D) project aims to provide evidence-based research from a number of countries in South America, Sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia. The primary objective of the programme is to improve educational policy, practice, and research in developing countries by better understanding the use and impact of OER….”

Predatory journals: Not just a problem in developing world countries, says new Nature paper – Retraction Watch at Retraction Watch

“‘Common wisdom,’ according to the authors of a new piece in Nature, “assumes that the hazard of predatory publishing is restricted mainly to the developing world.” But the authors of the new paper, led by David Moher of the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, found that more than half — 57% — of the 2,000 articles published in journals they determined were predatory were from high-income countries. In fact, the U.S. was second only to India in number of articles published in such journals. We asked Moher, who founded Ottawa Hospital’s Centre for Journalology in 2015, a few questions about the new work.”

The Open Source Ethos | A Growing Culture

“The internet now provides a free platform for sharing knowledge. How is it possible—or even socially just—that so many of us can’t get access to scholarly research? Isn’t society propelled forward by access to the science, literature, and art of the world’s scholars? What if that research is publicly funded? These are the primary concerns that drive the open access movement.

What would these concerns look like if we removed them from the scholarly communications circle and applied them to realms beyond the ivory tower like nature, society, technology, and ultimately the intersection of those things—agriculture. How does resource sharing affect biodiversity? How does knowledge exchange drive community resilience? How is information access—delivered via technologies—an equalizer among the underrepresented, marginalized, and oppressed? How does our ability to feed a growing planet depend on a culture of openness? Let me work my way back.”

Development and Access to Information (DA2I)

Development and Access to Information (DA2I) is the first of a series of annual reports that will monitor the progress countries are making towards fulfilling their commitment to promote meaningful access to information as part of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

DA2I will be launched annually, at the time of the United Nations High Level Political Forum (UN HLPF) and it is designed for UN member states, intergovernmental organizations, funders, civil society, other stakeholders working in development, and the library community itself. It underlines the invaluable contribution that information access, particularly through libraries, makes to promoting more socially and economically inclusive societies.

As well as updating on progress on a range of indicators of access to information, each DA2I report will have a focus on the SDGs selected for review at the HLPF in the year of publication. This includes thematic chapters on how access to information promotes the achievement of each of the selected SDGs.

The DA2I 2017 thematic chapters focus on the following goals: Zero Hunger (SDG2), Good Health and Well-being (SDG3), Gender Equality (SDG5), and Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure (SDG9).”