OpenDataCube

The Open Data Cube (ODC) is an Open Source Geospatial Data Management and Analysis Software project that helps you harness the power of Satellite data. At its core, the ODC is a set of Python libraries and PostgreSQL database that helps you work with geospatial raster data….

?The ODC seeks to increase the value and impact of global Earth observation satellite data by providing an open and freely accessible exploitation architecture. The ODC project seeks to foster a community to develop, sustain, and grow the technology and the breadth and depth of its applications for societal benefit….”

Earth Science Engagement Through Art and Astronaut Photography

“For over five decades of manned spaceflight missions, NASA astronauts have taken extraordinary photographs of Earth’s surface and dynamic processes. Humans on board the International Space Station (ISS) have a unique platform to perform Earth observations at various viewing angles, seasons, and times of day. Astronaut photos taken from the ISS comprise a true?color (RGB) dataset taken with multiple handheld digital cameras and lens types (prior to 2004, film cameras were in use). Earth observations through astronaut photography are an important and unique remote sensing method when monitoring natural disasters, urban growth, and environmental changes. While astronaut imagery can be used for earth science research, there is also an artistic aspect to the photography that fascinates a wide global population. A broader public audience can be introduced to earth science through high resolution, Earth art photos taken from the perspective of an astronaut. The Crew Earth Observations (CEO) Facility within the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit at NASA’s Johnson Space Center supports the acquisition, analysis, and curation of astronaut photography of Earth’s surface and atmosphere. CEO’s website, the Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth (eol.jsc.nasa.gov), provides free public access to view, search, and download over three million images taken by astronauts throughout all of NASA’s crewed spaceflight history, with an emphasis on current ISS imagery. The CEO Facility actively curates a digital collection of exceptional Earth art astronaut photos used for public engagement. Our new Downloadable Earth Art page focuses on broad earth science topics including: mountains, water, clouds, agriculture, as well as an “abstract” category. This continuously?updated collection is comprised of freely accessible and high?quality downloadable materials, such as single? and dual?screen digital wallpapers. All Earth Art materials are presented with science?based information that complements the artistic qualities of the imagery, and facilitate connections between general audiences and earth science from the International Space Station.”

Earth and Space Science Data Should Be Credited, Preserved, Open, and Accessible as an Integral Responsibility of Scientists, Data Stewards, and Sponsoring Institutions

“Earth and space sciences data are a world heritage. Properly documented, credited, and preserved, they will help future scientists understand the Earth, planetary, and heliophysics systems. They should be preserved long-term for future use. They should be made openly available to the scientific community and the public as soon as possible. They should be accessible in usable formats with sufficient machine-readable documentation to allow informed re-use. These responsibilities are an integral part of scientific research shared by individual scientists, data stewards, research institutions, and funding organizations….

Statement adopted by the American Geophysical Union 29 May 1997? Reaffirmed May 2001, May 2005, May 2006? Revised and Reaffirmed May 2009, February 2012, September 2015.”

Data Sharing and Citations: New Author Guidelines Promoting Open and FAIR Data in the Earth, Space, and Environmental Sciences – Science Editor

“New author guidelines supporting open and FAIR data in scholarly publishing are being adopted throughout the Earth, space, and environmental sciences community. With the new guidelines, supporting resources are provided. These include a new tool for finding the right repository and answers to frequently asked questions. Adoption of these new guidelines requires a shift in the scientific culture around data sharing. Support for this change is needed by researchers, institutions, funders, journals, repositories, and connecting infrastructure—which will advance research across the geosciences….”

New York Land Records Indexing Project | New York Genealogical & Biographical Society

“FamilySearch has digitized millions of original pages from counties across the state of New York.

The majority of these records include deeds and mortgages from various county offices covering a wide range of dates, none of which have been digitally indexed before.

This crowd-sourced project will enable anyone with an interest in preserving the records of New York to take part in the largest volunteer effort to index New York’s state records to date….”

USGS opens more science data — GCN

The U.S. Geological Survey plans to enhance online access by requiring that electronic copies of USGS-funded research be made available through the USGS Publications Warehouse. The data used to support the research findings must also be available for free when the associated study is published. That machine-readable information will be available via the USGS Science Data Catalog.

According to the recently approved plan, starting Oct. 1, 2016, any research that the USGS funds, including related datasets, must be made freely available to the public no later than a year after publication. The USGS will make exceptions where access must be restricted because of security, privacy, confidentiality or other constraints, agency officials said.

 

 

Specifically, final manuscripts in peer-reviewed scholarly journals and USGS publications are put into the USGS’s internal Information Product Data System repository, or “dark archive.” Within 12 months, research is released from the publisher or dark archive and made available for download, free of charge. Upon initial publication, the research must include a minimum set of machine-readable metadata elements to facilitate discovery….”

WorldMap

Harvard WorldMap is an online, open source mapping platform developed to lower barriers for scholars who wish to explore, visualize, edit, and publish geospatial information.  The system attempts to address the gap between desktop GIS which is generally light on collaboration, and web-based mapping systems which often don’t support the inclusion of large datasets….

WorldMap is being developed by the Center for Geographic Analysis at Harvard University….”

DataCite Repository Selector

“Repository Finder, a pilot project of the Enabling FAIR Data Project led by the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in partnership with DataCite and the earth and space sciences community, can help you find an appropriate repository to deposit your research data. The tool is hosted by DataCite and queries the re3data registry of research data repositories….”