EGU journals: open access publishing, public peer review and the new EGUsphere

“The EGU, through Copernicus Publications, publishes 19 peer-reviewed, open access journals that cover a wide range of topics within the Earth, planetary and space sciences. Not only are these EGU journals open access, but they also provide an open discussion forum that allows an open review, open discussion and transparent evaluation.

This webinar explains the interactive public peer review system, the role of the EGU Publication Committee, how researchers can effectively publish in an EGU Journal, and briefly describes the new EGUsphere….”

Power and the paywall: A Black feminist reflection on the socio-spatial formations of publishing

“Who owns knowledge? How do we disseminate it to benefit societal goals and values that speak norms of justice? Who should have access to knowledge? For whom should knowledge serve? In our time, the highly active landscape of knowledge production via publication, with widespread immediate interconnectivity of scholars around the world, allows for the making of a stronger intellectual community. It can be argued that this one of many impacts of globalization, in that academics are more interconnected than ever before, just as world economies, geopolitics, and global media. Moreover, the scholars who present new knowledges or make visible alternative knowledges come from a wider range of backgrounds than ever before, including non-white/Euro-descendant racial and ethnic groups, working class people, all genders, all sexualities, and non-Western nations. Beyond that, scholars are engaging with a broader body of research subjects and ideas that can transform society in exciting ways.

Understanding this means that theorizing the possibilities of open access is a productive dialogue. The challenges of paywalls are multiple and overlapping. Engaging in such debates calls for deconstructing the value of knowledge repositories guarded behind a pay schedule. There are a number of questions to raise regarding the gatekeeping mechanisms of paywalls: How do paywalls represent a form of power? For what reason do we create a financial barrier to intellectual labor? Aside from hosting intellectual work (in digital and print form), what is the necessity of creating a corporate system that profits from labor that journal hosting bodies are not financially or otherwise accountable to? The perspective in this paper is largely situated in a North American – primarily United States-based – perspective….

Widespread open access publishing would bring about a more just distribution of knowledge within the United States and globally.”

The growth of open access publishing in geochemistry – ScienceDirect

“Highlights

 

• 40% of articles in 2018-2019 published as Gold Open Access (OA).
• 70% in fully OA journals with a mean Article Processing Charge (APC) of US$ 900.
• 30% in historical hybrid journals with higher APC of more than $US 1,800.
• Correlation between number of OA articles in hybrids journals and impact factor.
• Relationship between number of OA articles in fully OA journals and APC….”

 

5,000 rare and unique maps are now available online

“Over 5,000 unique maps from the Asia-Pacific Map Collection are now available online as part of an ongoing project by The Australian National University’s College of Asia and the Pacific.

This significant portion of the college’s map collection is now available on Open Research for people to download and enjoy for free.

 

The collection is home to a variety of topographic, cadastral, aeronautical, and thematic maps, some of which date back hundreds of years….”

EarthArXiv announces new partnership with California Digital Library to host earth sciences preprint service – Office of Scholarly Communication

“The Advisory Council of the EarthArXiv preprint service for earth sciences is pleased to announce a partnership with the California Digital Library (CDL) that will support EarthArXiv’s mission, future growth, and long-term sustainability. Core to this partnership will be the transition of EarthArXiv’s preprints server – including public display and submission management – from the Center for Open Science to the eScholarship Publishing program at the CDL.

CDL will host EarthArXiv using Janeway, an open source publishing platform developed by the Centre for Technology and Publishing and the Open Library of Humanities at Birkbeck University of London. EarthArXiv’s Advisory Council will maintain ownership and control over the preprint server, while the eScholarship Publishing team will contribute to the development, support, and maintenance of the Janeway platform.

Since its founding, EarthArXiv has partnered with the Center for Open Science to host its content online. Recently, however, financial considerations made it necessary for the Advisory Council to explore alternative hosting partners. “After several organizations stepped up to offer new partnerships (for which EarthArXiv will always be grateful), the Advisory Council voted unanimously to partner with the team at the California Digital Library,” said Bruce Caron, one of the founders of EarthArXiv….”

ENABLING FAIR DATA PROJECT – COPDESS

“The Laura and John Arnold Foundation has awarded a grant to a coalition of groups representing the international Earth and space science community, convened by the American Geophysical Union (AGU), to develop standards that will connect researchers, publishers, and data repositories in the Earth, space, and environmental sciences to enable FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable) data on a large scale. This project will accelerate scientific discovery and enhance the integrity, transparency, and reproducibility of this data.”

On the Potential of Preprints in Geochemistry: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly | HTML

Abstract:  In recent years, the pace of the dissemination of scientific information has increased. In this context, the possibility and value of sharing open access (OA) online manuscripts in their preprint form seem to be growing in many scientific fields. More and more platforms are especially dedicated to free preprint publishing. They are published, non-peer-reviewed scholarly papers that typically precede publication in a peer-reviewed journal. They have been a part of science since at least the 1960s. In 1990, Tim Berners-Lee created the World Wide Web to help researchers share knowledge easily. A few months later, in August 1991, as a centralized web-based network, arXiv was created. arXiv is arguably the most influential preprint platform and has supported the fields of physics, mathematics and computer science for over 30 years. Since, preprint platforms have become popular in many disciplines (e.g., bioRxiv for biological sciences) due to the increasing drive towards OA publishing, and can be publisher- or community-driven, profit or not for profit, and based on proprietary or free and open source software. A range of discipline-specific or cross-domain platforms now exist, with exponential growth these last five years. While preprints as a whole still represent only a small proportion of scholarly publishing, a strong community of early adopters is already beginning to experiment with such value-enhancing tools in many more disciplines than before. The two main options for geochemists are EarthArXiv and ESSOAr. A “one size fits all” model for preprints would never work across the entire scientific community. The geochemistry community needs to develop and sustain their own model.