ASR – Interactive open access to climate observations from Germany

Abstract:  During recent years, Germany’s national meteorological service (Deutscher Wetterdienst, DWD) has significantly expanded the open access to its climate observations. A first step was a simple FTP-site with the possibility for downloading archives with various categories of data, e.g. national and international station-based meteorological data, derived parameters, gridded products and special categories as e.g. phenological data. The data are based on the observing systems of DWD for Germany as well as international activities of DWD. To improve the interactive and user-friendly access to the data, a new portal has been developed. The portal serves a variety of user requirements that result from the broad range of applications of DWD’s climate data. Here we provide an overview of the new climate data portal of DWD. It is based on a systematic implementation of OGC-based technologies. It allows easy graphical access to the station data, but also supports access via technical interfaces, esp. Web-Map- and Web-Feature-Services.

Do street-level scene perceptions affect housing prices in Chinese megacities? An analysis using open access datasets and deep learning

Abstract:  Many studies have explored the relationship between housing prices and environmental characteristics using the hedonic price model (HPM). However, few studies have deeply examined the impact of scene perception near residential units on housing prices. This article used house purchasing records from FANG.com and open access geolocation data (including massive street view pictures, point of interest (POI) data and road network data) and proposed a framework named “open-access-dataset-based hedonic price modeling (OADB-HPM)” for comprehensive analysis in Beijing and Shanghai, China. A state-of-the-art deep learning framework and massive Baidu street view panoramas were employed to visualize and quantify three major scene perception characteristics (greenery, sky and building view indexes, abbreviated GVI, SVI and BVI, respectively) at the street level. Then, the newly introduced scene perception characteristics were combined with other traditional characteristics in the HPM to calculate marginal prices, and the results for Beijing and Shanghai were explored and compared. The empirical results showed that the greenery and sky perceptual elements at the property level can significantly increase the housing price in Beijing (RMB 39,377 and 6011, respectively) and Shanghai (RMB 21,689 and 2763, respectively), indicating an objectively higher willingness by buyers to pay for houses that provide the ability to perceive natural elements in the surrounding environment. This study developed quantification tools to help decision makers and planners understand and analyze the interaction between residents and urban scene components.

Laying the Foundation for Community-Driven, Open Cultural Gazetteers

Abstract:  Geospatial humanities projects rely on information found in gazetteers to supply the infrastructure for projects. However, a majority of spatial gazetteers provide place names and geographical coordinates but lack contextualizing information that give meaning to a place, making them insufficient resources for humanities inquiry. In this article, I explore contemporary approaches to data collection and models for cultural gazetteers set forth by early modern chorographical traditions to lay the foundation for building community-driven, open cultural gazetteers. Concurrently, the role of the public in providing Volunteered Geographical Information (VGI) by harnessing user-friendly tools is explored.

Errors in Time-Series Remote Sensing and an Open Access Application for Detecting and Visualizing Spatial Data Outliers Using Google Earth Engine – IEEE Journals & Magazine

“Following here is a case of NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) time-series vegetation productivity where we observed several substantial inconsistencies among versions of the same product. The anomalies discovered are not isolated to a particular region, persisting across geographies, and occurring at multiple time intervals. In response to these findings, we developed a simple yet effective open access application for detecting and visualizing remote sensing data outliers using the Google Earth Engine platform. …”

Errors in Time-Series Remote Sensing and an Open Access Application for Detecting and Visualizing Spatial Data Outliers Using Google Earth Engine – IEEE Journals & Magazine

“Following here is a case of NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) time-series vegetation productivity where we observed several substantial inconsistencies among versions of the same product. The anomalies discovered are not isolated to a particular region, persisting across geographies, and occurring at multiple time intervals. In response to these findings, we developed a simple yet effective open access application for detecting and visualizing remote sensing data outliers using the Google Earth Engine platform. …”

OpenPlanetary Townhall on Open Science

“The paradigm of Open Science is based on the tiers Open Access, Open Data and Free Open Source Software (FOSS). However, the interconnections between the tiers remain to be improved. This is a critical factor to enable Open Science. This Townhall meeting reaches out all across EGU, espescially welcoming Early Career Scientists, to network and discuss the current challenges and opportunities…”

FOSS4G EO Data Challenge « FOSS4G 2019 Bucharest

With the FOSS4G EO Data Challenge, we are challenging startups, developers, students and researchers to come up with useful, valuable or interesting open source applications using large volumes of EO data (and their evolution in time) and state-of-the art technologies (AI/ML, HMC, STAC, data cube, COG). Linking of EO data with other sources of open data (e.g. OpenStreetMap, Copernicus Services – Land, Atmosphere, Climate) is highly encouraged. Our voluntary mentors will guide the process to mature and demonstrate your ideas….”

Digital landform reconstruction using old and recent open access digital aerial photos – ScienceDirect

Abstract:  Technological progress in remote sensing has enabled digital representation of terrain through new techniques (e.g. digital photogrammetry) and instruments (e.g. 3D laser scanners). However, the use of old aerial images remains important in geosciences to reconstruct past landforms and detect long-term topographic changes. Administrations have recently expressed growing interest in sharing photogrammetric datasets on public repositories, providing opportunities to exploit these resources and detect natural and anthropogenic topographic changes. The SfM-MVS photogrammetric technique was applied to scanned historical black and white aerial photos of the Serra de Fontcalent (Alicante, Spain), as well as to recent high-quality digital aerial photos. Ground control points (GCPs) extracted from a LiDAR-derived three-dimensional point cloud were used to georeference the results with non-linear deformations. Two point clouds obtained with SfM-MVS were compared with the LiDAR-derived reference point cloud. Based on the result, the quality of the models was analysed through the comparison of the stages on stable areas, i.e., lands where no variations were detected, and active areas, with quarries, new infrastructures, fillings, excavations or new buildings. This study also indicates that errors are higher for old aerial photos (up to 5?m on average) than recent digital photos (up to 0.5?m). The application of SfM-MVS to open access data generated 3D models that enhance the geomorphological analysis, compared to stereophotogrammetry, and effectively detected activities in quarries and building of landfills.

‘Historical Google Earth’ project captures a changing Britain | Culture | The Guardian

A “historical Google Earth” featuring aerial photographs of Britain going back to 1945 has been made freely available by Cambridge University.

The vast archive captures 70 years of change across urban and rural landscapes, from the bomb-scarred postwar period to the emergence of motorways and skyscrapers.

The aerial photographs, showing Britain from the air from the 1940s up to 2009, were taken by former wartime RAF pilots at the instruction of the Cambridge archaeologist Kenneth St Joseph.

The first 1,500 photographs, covering almost every corner of the UK, were published on Friday, the first batch from an archive of almost 500,000….”