Open Parks Network

“Since 2010, Clemson University and the National Park Service have collaborated on the Open Parks Network, an Institute of Museum and Library Services funded project that has resulted in the digitization of over 350,000 cultural heritage objects and 1.5 million pages of gray literature housed in the libraries, museums, and archives of our nation’s parks, historic sites, and other protected areas. More than 20 national parks and other protected sites are represented in these diverse collections, as well as 2 state park systems and 3 university libraries. The Open Parks Network provides public access to high-resolution, downloadable files….”

IsoArcH – An open-access and collaborative isotope database for bioarcheological samples from the Graeco-Roman world

“IsoArcH is an open access spatial database of bioarcheological isotopic data of the Graeco-Roman world. It consists of georeferenced isotopic, archaeological, and anthropological information related to the study of dietary and mobility patterns of human and animal populations. IsoArcH focuses on the Mediterranean region between the 12th c. BC and the 8th c. AD, although some northern European sites are also included….”

The Pledge – I support Open Principles for Science and Education for building a better world for everyone | ICA Commission on Open Source Geospatial Technologies

“Please find below the  pledge for  supporting Open Principles for Science and Education for building a better world for everyone .

‘I believe Science is a public good and quality education opportunities should be open and accessible for everyone.

I will work to eliminate the digital divide and contribute to building up Open Knowledge for the benefit of all humanity, with special effort to enlighten future generations.

I contribute my service for the betterment of all humanity using the guiding principles of the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in building a better world for everyone.

I will work to advance and increase Open Knowledge for the benefit of all humanity with special consideration of those less fortunate.

I will be a voice for Open Principles in Science and Education and promote this pledge through my networks.’

Thank you for your support.”

The Vadose Zone Journal transitions to open access | EurekAlert! Science News

“On January 1, 2018, the Vadose Zone Journal(VZJ) will switch from the subscription format to a fully Open Access journal. This process has been initiated by the VZJ editorial board and carefully prepared over the past three years. The transition of VZJ to an Open Access journal was approved at the May 2017 meeting of the Soil Science Society of America’s Board of Directors.”

A global multiproxy database for temperature reconstructions of the Common Era | Scientific Data

“Proxy records used in the PAGES2k synthesis products are publicly available through previous publications or online data archives, or because their owners made them available for inclusion in this open-access data product. The original data for 49 records are made available for the first time in this data product (specified in Supplementary Table 1). Open access is a critical component of this endeavor, and led us to reject some records that would have been suitable under the other criteria. …”

The Next Generation of 3D Tiles

“Nearly two years ago, we announced the 3D Tiles initiative for streaming massive heterogeneous 3D geospatial datasets. It is amazing and humbling to see how much of it has come to fruition and how a vibrant community has formed around 3D Tiles.

With this initial success, we now have the foundation for modern 3D geospatial: Cesium as the canvas, 3D Tiles as the conduit, and the seemingly endless stream of geospatial data as the supply.

The data acquisition trends are clear: we are collecting more data, more frequently, at a higher resolution and lower cost than ever before, and the data is inherently 3D, driven by heterogeneous sources such as photogrammetry and LIDAR.

The challenge now is to realize the full value of these data. With your help, of course!…”

The Vadose Zone Journal is Transitioning to Open Access!

“The Vadose Zone Journal editorial board is confident that the switch to Open Access will increase the international visibility of the journal, broaden the submission base and increase accessibility to many scientists and institutions in developing countries. I am excited about this new chapter in the Vadose Zone Journal.” 

Moving to open access: an editor’s view | Editor Resources

“The Journal of Maps is a peer-reviewed, inter-disciplinary, online journal that aims to provide a forum for researchers to publish maps and spatial diagrams. From September 2016, the journal will be a fully open access journal, meaning all articles will, if accepted, be available for anyone to read anywhere, at any time immediately on publication. But what are the implications of this move to open access? What are the benefits? Mike Smith, Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Maps reflects….”

A perspective on problems and prospects for academic publishing in Geography – Meadows – 2016 – Geo: Geography and Environment – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  This commentary highlights problems of inequity in academic publishing in geography that arise from the increasing use of metrics as a measure of research quality. In so doing, we examine patterns in the ranking of geographical journals in the major global databases (e.g. Web of Science, Scopus) and compare these with a more inclusive database developed by the International Geographical Union. The shortcomings of ranking systems are examined and are shown to include, inter alia, linguistic bias, the lack of representation of books and chapters in books, the geographical unevenness of accredited journals, problems of multi-authorship, the mismatch between ranking and social usefulness and alternative or critical thinking, as well as differences between physical and human geography. The hegemony of the global commercial publishing houses emerges as problematic for geography in particular. It is argued that the global community of geographers should continue to challenge the use of bibliometrics as a means of assessing research quality.

[Includes a section, “Is open access an adequate response?”]

Knowledge-hub on colored gemstones | UDaily

“With $350,000 in support from The Tiffany & Co. Foundation, [the University of Delaware’s Saleem Ali] will create an open-access repository for existing global knowledge around colored gemstones and target critical research necessary to surmount challenges facing individuals involved in colored gemstone mining and manufacturing….”