8 Ways Departing EPA Chief Scott Pruitt Suppressed Science – Truthdig

“In March, Pruitt proposed a new “science transparency policy.” Under the proposed rule, when the EPA designs pollution standards and rules, it would use only studies in which the underlying data is public. Pruitt said his policy would prevent the EPA from using “secret science” that cannot be tested by other researchers. But scientists say important findings could be excluded.

One example is research by Harvard University that linked fine particle pollution in U.S. cities with an increase in deaths from lung and heart diseases. The data for the 1993 study was key to the EPA’s setting of health standards that regulate air pollution. But the study’s underlying data is not public because researchers promised confidentiality to their subjects, 8,000 adults and 14,000 children in six cities….”

RNLI launches an Open Data site! — Esri UK

Open Data and the ArcGIS Living Atlas of the World were hot topics at our Esri UK conference last month. We showcased the power of using The Royal National Lifeboat Institution’s Open Data and The Living Atlas to perform real-world analysis in our opening plenary

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) provides a 24-hour service in the UK and Ireland and have saved over 142,200 lives since 1824.

The RNLI uses ArcGIS to analyse risk which enables them to save more lives through innovation, data analysis, and new technology. The next step to share knowledge is to make their data public, which is why the RNLI have released Open Data.

Joint declaration by the African, Caribbean and Pacific group of states and the EU on climate change – Consilium

The Joint declaration by the African, Caribbean and Pacific group of states and the EU on climate change includes thanks (Section 14) for “the Intra-ACP Climate Services Programme, an initiative of the ACP Group of States, funded with 85 million EUR, also from the European Development Fund, to strengthen the capacities of regional hydro-meteorological organisations to take advantage of the full and open access to high-resolution data and value-added information from the EU’s Earth Observation Programme, Copernicus.”

Obstacles facing Africa’s young climate scientists | Nature Climate Change

“However, early-career scientists in Africa face numerous challenges in securing resources, training and research positions. These challenges threaten to undermine the continent’s ability to deal with environmental change resulting from climate change….One such challenge is underfunded and inadequate research facilities4. Computational and e-infrastructure limitations are especially salient; high demand for supercomputers and sufficient storage for big data far exceed what most African universities can afford. The ratio between the number of usable computers and users is low in most universities5. Some also struggle to bear the cost of subscribing to closed-access journals. While open-access journals provide unmeasurable succour to researchers in these institutions, scientists are left with an incomplete view of progress in their fields….”

National Geographic Has Digitized Its Collection of 6,000+ Vintage Maps: See a Curated Selection of Maps Published Between 1888 and Today | Open Culture

“Started as the official journal of the National Geographic Society, the magazine has amassed a huge, 130-year archive of  “editorial cartography,” the National Geographic site writes. “Now, for the first time,” that collection is available online, “every map ever published in the magazine since the first issue of October 1888.” …”

What’s the Best Way to Responsibly Collect Ocean Data? – Eos

“Workshop participants determined that the path forward centers on the adoption of the Ocean Best Practices (OBP) “repository,” developed by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization’s International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (UNESCO-IODE). The UNESCO-IODE repository is a sustained, open access, and internationally recognized store of standard operating procedures, manuals, operating guidelines, and documentation of methods. It is focused on offering to the ocean community the best practices that have repeatedly produced superior results relative to other methodologies with the same objective and applied in the same environmental context….”

What’s the Best Way to Responsibly Collect Ocean Data? – Eos

“Workshop participants determined that the path forward centers on the adoption of the Ocean Best Practices (OBP) “repository,” developed by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization’s International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (UNESCO-IODE). The UNESCO-IODE repository is a sustained, open access, and internationally recognized store of standard operating procedures, manuals, operating guidelines, and documentation of methods. It is focused on offering to the ocean community the best practices that have repeatedly produced superior results relative to other methodologies with the same objective and applied in the same environmental context….”

REF open-access requirement for books ‘worth the outlay’ | Times Higher Education (THE)

As preparations for the 2021 research excellence framework continue apace, UK-based academics could be forgiven for pushing the 2027 assessment to the back of their minds for now.

However, one specific element of the plans for the REF after next has been triggering lively debate in recent weeks: the proposed extension of open-access requirements for submitted outputs to include long-form scholarly works and monographs.