Open Access Transformation in Switzerland & Germany > ./scidecode

“Christian Gutknecht published an exciting posting on the Swiss EUR 57 million Elsevier deal in which he outlines the transformative Open Access agreement between Elsevier and swissuniversities. Since Germany has been trying for years to reach such a contract with Elsevier, it is worth comparing it with the two transformative contracts with Wiley and Springer Nature in Germany, which were reached and coordinated by Project DEAL. Both German agreements were discussed here before just as other transformative Open Access agreements. For those in a hurry: At the end of the posting there is a synopsis of the costs and Open Access components of the Open Access Transformation in Switzerland & Germany. At the very beginning I would like to thank Christian Gutknecht very much for sharing and discussing information that went into this posting….”

Science publishing has opened up during the coronavirus pandemic. It won’t be easy to keep it that way

Scientific publishing is not known for moving rapidly. In normal times, publishing new research can take months, if not years. Researchers prepare a first version of a paper on new findings and submit it to a journal, where it is often rejected, before being resubmitted to another journal, peer-reviewed, revised and, eventually, hopefully published.

All scientists are familiar with the process, but few love it or the time it takes. And even after all this effort – for which neither the authors, the peer reviewers, nor most journal editors, are paid – most research papers end up locked away behind expensive journal paywalls. They can only be read by those with access to funds or to institutions that can afford subscriptions.

Science publishing has opened up during the coronavirus pandemic. It won’t be easy to keep it that way

Scientific publishing is not known for moving rapidly. In normal times, publishing new research can take months, if not years. Researchers prepare a first version of a paper on new findings and submit it to a journal, where it is often rejected, before being resubmitted to another journal, peer-reviewed, revised and, eventually, hopefully published.

All scientists are familiar with the process, but few love it or the time it takes. And even after all this effort – for which neither the authors, the peer reviewers, nor most journal editors, are paid – most research papers end up locked away behind expensive journal paywalls. They can only be read by those with access to funds or to institutions that can afford subscriptions.

L’open science en transition : des pirates à la dérive ?

From Google’s English:  “For years, institutions and scientists have launched great maneuvers to switch to open access. If open science progresses, we remain far from the objectives and the budgets devoted to scientific publications explode. 

In mid-June, the University of California signed an open access agreement with one of the five multinational publishing companies, Springer-Nature. It follows in particular those signed in May by the Dutch and Swiss universities with the other behemoth in the sector, Elsevier. The MIT announced a few days earlier  to end negotiations with Elsevier  for a new subscription contract to its scientific journals, putting forward ”  the principles of open access  ” to justify itself.

Since 2010, the balance of power between the open science movement and the major scientific publishers could appear completely reversed. That year, MIT felt compelled to actively collaborate (while pretending to take a neutral stance) in the investigation against its young student Aaron Swartz….”

Personal open access report with one click – SNF

Which of my scientific publications are openly accessible? As of now, researchers in Switzerland can find the answer to this question by using the “SNSF Open Access Check” web application. This prototype searches articles that have been published since 2015.

The International Journal of Public Health transitions to Open Access – Science & research news | Frontiers

“The International Journal of Public Health is pleased to announce that from January 2021 it will transition from a subscription model to Gold Open Access. 

The journal, which celebrates its 100th anniversary soon, will also be transferring from its current publisher Springer Nature to Frontiers, a leading Gold Open Access publisher offering tailored services and a highly technologically advanced platform.

Owned by the Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), the School is proud to announce the transition….”

DORA’s first funder discussion: updates from Swiss National Science Foundation, Wellcome Trust, and the Dutch Research Council – DORA

“DORA launched a new virtual discussion series for public and private research funders on Wednesday, March 26. The goal of the series is to increase communication about research assessment reform by providing a space for funders to share and discuss new initiatives. We hope this will ultimately serve as a platform to accelerate the spread of good research assessment policies and practices.

Representatives from the Swiss National Science Foundation, Dutch Research Council, and Wellcome Trust provided updates on some of their pilot projects….”

Nutzenversprechen Law School Rechtswissenschaftliche Abteilung der Universität St.Gallen

[Warning: The URL forces a PDF download. It will not display the PDF in your browser.]

From Google’s English:  “The RWA [Rechtswissenschaftliche Abteilung] sees itself as an active link between science and the public: RWA members communicate theirs Research findings taking into account the university open access strategy and bring get involved in the public (technical) discourse. The RWA makes its contribution, the awareness and attractiveness of St.Gallen as a science location in Switzerland and internationally to increase.”

 

2nd Basel Sustainable Publishing Forum – The Global Transition to Open Access: Challenges and Solutions

“The 2nd Basel Sustainable Publishing Forum (BSPF) will be held in Basel, 26–27 October 2020. The aim of the forum is to offer a platform for open and constructive conversation between researchers, learned societies, university librarians, funding agencies, scholarly publishers, publishing platforms, and other concerned stakeholders (professional associations, etc.) to identify implementable solutions for a sustainable global transition to open access. A main topic of discussion of BSPF2 will be the challenges facing learned societies in this transition to Open Access, but the conference will also cover a broad array of topics relevant to these challenges, like the development of alternative metrics, the evaluation and promotion of researchers, the OA price transparency, the current situation and limitations of transformative agreements, copyright, etc….”

Scientific Advisor Open Science (W/M) (50-60%)

“Your mission :

The Scientific Advisor position is part of the EPFL Open Science Initiative, which aims to promote the adoption of best practice in research documentation and dissemination, at our institution and beyond. The ideal candidate will be responsible for sustaining existing aspects of the initiative, as well as for the development and implementation of innovative new avenues. EPFL is seeking an enthusiastic and independent individual, with Science Policy experience and a proven track record of turning original ideas into measurable impact….”