Affordabee: Low-Cost Open Access Publishing – eLife Innovation Sprint 2020

“Adam is an MSc student at a local university in Kenya. He has to work part time to pay his school fees. Adam does the same through his research project to pay for bench fees at a local research institution. Through sweat and long nights, he manages to get a manuscript ready, as he has to publish to graduate. Adam recently attended a seminar where he was introduced to open science. He is excited about his first paper and wants to publish open access. His excitement is cut short when he realises he has to pay a US$3,000 article processing charge (APC) to get his manuscript published. What are his options? Are there publishers that can offer him a waiver or a subsidy? Or, are there some funding opportunities he can tap into for support?

We envision a platform that can help Adam identify journals that can offer him waivers or subsidies, and how to access them; a platform that will point him to funding opportunities to help cover the APC. We seek a platform that will reduce the APC cost barrier for students from resource-poor settings, like Adam. …”

Ask the Community (and Chefs): How Can We Achieve Equitable Participation in Open Research? – Part 2 – The Scholarly Kitchen

In yesterday’s “Ask the Community (and Chefs)” post, most contributors acknowledged that some progress has been made, but we still have a long way to go. Today we continue to add the voices of Chefs and community members. Please add your own responses to the question in the comments.

University of North Carolina Studies in Germanic Languages and Literature – UNC Press

“The Press and its partners, UNC Chapel Hill’s Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and the UNC Library, are pleased to make available 124 monographs, translations, and critical editions. This is the first time these works will be available as ebooks, which will be accessible in open access PDF and EPUB (with a few exceptions) formats, as well as in new paperback editions. The digital editions will be hosted on the Carolina Digital Repository, Project MUSE, JSTOR, OAPEN, and a number of other open access platforms….”

Subscribe to Open: A practical approach for converting subscription journals to open access – Crow – 2020 – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  Key points

 

OA business models must be sustainable over the long term, and article processing charge payments do not work for all; Subscribe to Open (S2O) is proposed, and being tested, as an alternative model.
The S2O model motivates subscribers to participate through economic self?interest, without reliance on institutional altruism or collective behaviour.
The S2O offer targets current subscribers, uses existing subscription systems, and recurs annually, allowing publishers to control risk and revert to conventional subscriptions if necessary.
An Annual Reviews pilot is currently testing the S2O model with five journals.

Nature journals announce first open-access agreement

“The publisher of Nature has agreed its first deal to allow some researchers to publish in the journal, and in 33 other Nature-branded titles, under open-access (OA) terms.

Research published in Nature and its sister journals is behind a paywall, although the journals have sometimes chosen to make articles OA. But in April, publisher Springer Nature announced that it would offer open-accessing publishing routes for its most selective journals that would comply with Plan S, a European-led initiative to open up the scientific literature. (Nature is editorially independent of its publisher.)….

The publisher of Nature has agreed its first deal to allow some researchers to publish in the journal, and in 33 other Nature-branded titles, under open-access (OA) terms.

Research published in Nature and its sister journals is behind a paywall, although the journals have sometimes chosen to make articles OA. But in April, publisher Springer Nature announced that it would offer open-accessing publishing routes for its most selective journals that would comply with Plan S, a European-led initiative to open up the scientific literature. (Nature is editorially independent of its publisher.)…”

Structural inequalities in scholarly communications

“However, there are significant drawbacks to electronic resources:

Electronic versions of scholarly materials are subject to licenses, which often put strict limitations on who can use them. Libraries can share print materials by sending them through interlibrary loan — mailing materials to those who need them — but not all e-journal content can be shared this way. E-books usually can’t be shared between libraries, meaning that they are available only to those who have a current affiliation with the University or those who can physically visit one of our spaces.
E-materials are expensive and often do not have the “friendliest” terms. Multi-user licenses are not always available or may be prohibitively expensive. In a time when University budgets are facing large cuts, it is hard to accept that a print volume may cost $100, yet the multi-user e-version might cost $900.
Electronic materials also often lack perpetual access. This may mean that the same materials have to be purchased multiple times.
Access to electronic materials also requires access to the internet — stable broadband access. This is often lacking for scholars all over the world; even in the United States, it is estimated that only three-quarters of adults have broadband internet service at home….”

News & Views: Open Access Market Sizing Update 2020 – Delta Think

“Delta Think’s OA Market Sizing (i.e., revenue generated by providers or, conversely, costs incurred to buyers of content) shows that the open access market continues to grow faster than the underlying journals publishing market. Based on current trends, we estimate it to have been worth around $763m in 2019 and on track to grow to around $850m in 2020….”

Economics of Scholarly Monographs | Center for Research on Equitable and Open Scholarship

“There is ongoing tension between the desire of scholars to share their work widely and openly, and the need to fund the infrastructure and labor of publishing. One place in which this tension is most evident is in the sale of scholarly monographs. While they are a smaller fraction of scholarly communications volume, market, and readership — academic monographs continue to play an important role in the humanities (and in some qualitative social science) where they are understood to represent an important form of long-form scholarship — not readily expressible through journal-length publication; and a critical component of tenure and evaluation. 

To characterize the current state of the art and practices in the economics of scholarly monographs we developed this selective bibliography. …”

DOAB milestones: 30,000 OA books, 400 publishers

“We are pleased to share that the Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB) recently reached three key milestones in terms of book coverage, unique publishers and future financial sustainability. 

Over 30,000 books from more than 400 publishers 

The number of open access books included in DOAB has grown impressively from just over 10,000 books in 2018 to 31,917 as of today. In terms of publishers, we are happy to see that over 400 publishers are included in DOAB as we strive to improve the coverage of the directory….”