Waiving article processing charges for least developed countries: a keystone of a large-scale open access transformation

Abstract:  This article investigates whether it is economically feasible for a large publishing house to waive article processing charges for the group of 47 so-called least developed countries (LDC). As an example, Springer Nature is selected. The analysis is based on the Web of Science, OpenAPC and the Jisc Collections’ Springer Compact journal list. As a result, it estimates an average yearly publication output of 520 publications (or 0.26% of the worldwide publication output in Springer Nature journals) for the LDC country group. The loss of revenues for Springer Nature would be US$1.1 million if a waiver was applied for all of these countries. Given that the subject categories of these publications indicate the output is of high societal relevance for LDC, and given that money is indispensable for development in these countries (e.g. life expectancy, health, education), it is not only desirable but also possible in economic terms for a publisher like Springer Nature to waive APCs for these countries without much loss in revenues.

 

Why openness makes research infrastructure resilient – Cousijn – 2021 – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

“Key points

 

Open research infrastructure provides the building blocks of scientific progress, which must be available to everyone, with no barriers to access.
Organizations enabling open research infrastructure must endorse these fundamental principles: equity, value, trust, interoperability, sustainability, and community governance.
Finding ways to invite co?creation and community participation engenders a strong sense of ‘buy?in’ and is therefore essential to developing successful research infrastructure….”

Why openness makes research infrastructure resilient – Cousijn – 2021 – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

“Key points

 

Open research infrastructure provides the building blocks of scientific progress, which must be available to everyone, with no barriers to access.
Organizations enabling open research infrastructure must endorse these fundamental principles: equity, value, trust, interoperability, sustainability, and community governance.
Finding ways to invite co?creation and community participation engenders a strong sense of ‘buy?in’ and is therefore essential to developing successful research infrastructure….”

Rethink and reassess the role of community in post-pandemic open scie…

“In this OAWeek 2020 we share three of our main concerns from a developing region perspective ?Underfunding of community-owned infrastructures because scarce funds directed to APCs ?Researchers rewarded only when publishing in “mainstream” journals with “prestige industry” indicators, making invisible other contributions ?Weak international dialogue, cooperation and interoperability among community-owned infrastructures…”

Rethink and reassess the role of community in post-pandemic open scie…

“In this OAWeek 2020 we share three of our main concerns from a developing region perspective ?Underfunding of community-owned infrastructures because scarce funds directed to APCs ?Researchers rewarded only when publishing in “mainstream” journals with “prestige industry” indicators, making invisible other contributions ?Weak international dialogue, cooperation and interoperability among community-owned infrastructures…”

Grossmann, Brembs (2021) Current market rates for scholarly publishing services | F1000Research

Grossmann A and Brembs B. Current market rates for scholarly publishing services [version 1; peer review: awaiting peer review]. F1000Research 2021, 10:20 (https://doi.org/10.12688/f1000research.27468.1)

Abstract: For decades, the supra-inflation increase of subscription prices for scholarly journals has concerned scholarly institutions. After years of fruitless efforts to solve this “serials crisis”, open access has been proposed as the latest potential solution. However, the prices for open access publishing are also high and are rising well beyond inflation. What has been missing from the public discussion so far is a quantitative approach to determine the actual costs of efficiently publishing a scholarly article using state-of-the-art technologies, such that informed decisions can be made as to appropriate price levels. Here we provide a granular, step-by-step calculation of the costs associated with publishing primary research articles, from submission, through peer-review, to publication, indexing and archiving. We find that these costs range from less than US$200 per article in modern, large-scale publishing platforms using post-publication peer-review, to about US$1,000 per article in prestigious journals with rejection rates exceeding 90%. The publication costs for a representative scholarly article today come to lie at around US$400. We discuss the additional non-publication items that make up the difference between publication costs and final price.

“It’s hard to explain why this is taking so long” – scilog

When it comes into force at the beginning of 2021, the Open Access initiative “Plan S” is poised to help opening up and improving academic publishing. Ulrich Pöschl, a chemist and Open Access advocate of the first hour, explains why free access to research results is important and how an up-to-date academic publishing system can work.

Redesign open science for Asia, Africa and Latin America

“Research is relatively new in many countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Across these regions, young scientists are working to build practices for open science from the ground up. The aim is that scientific communities will incorporate these principles as they grow. But these communities’ needs differ from those that are part of mature research systems. So, rather than shifting and shaping established systems, scientists are endeavouring to design new ones….”