Listserv for Open Working Group at Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society

“Working group [at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society] to work on open approaches to creation, invention, and entrepreneurship. Topics include creating open source licenses, open patent strategies, exploring alternative business models, open government, and the communities that arise from open and peer production.”

Listserv for Open Working Group at Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society

“Working group [at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society] to work on open approaches to creation, invention, and entrepreneurship. Topics include creating open source licenses, open patent strategies, exploring alternative business models, open government, and the communities that arise from open and peer production.”

Colonial North America at Harvard Library

“Colonial North America at Harvard Library provides access to remarkable and wide-ranging materials digitized as part of an ongoing, multi-year project. When complete, the project will make available to the world approximately 470,000 digitized pages of all known archival and manuscript materials in the Harvard Library that relate to 17th- and 18th-century North America. At present, there are nearly 300,000 digitized pages available through this website and updates are made periodically. The items linked to the map below illustrate the nature of the materials in the collection. Not only documenting life in New England, the collection also extends well beyond those boundaries to Canada, other areas of North America, and South America; to Atlantic islands and across the Atlantic Ocean to Great Britain, continental Europe, and parts of Africa. Curated features on the website provide a deeper look at several topical areas and suggest ways of approaching the use of different kinds of materials to gain new insights. This website is updated regularly, so please check back for newly digitized content and features….”

The Harvard Crimson :: Opinion :: Access For All

“Our professors do the research. They write the papers and proofread them. They even do the peer review. Then they sign the copyright over to publishers, who don’t pay them a dime—they’re paid by grants and salary, our taxes, and tuition. 

Harvard then pays again for the journals—many of them over $10,000 each—and most of us feel personally the bite each term when we buy our sourcebooks. Many of these cost upwards of $100 not because they’re on paper rather than online (printing costs pennies a page), but because of the fees charged by publishers like Elsevier (1,387 journals ranging across academia) and Wiley (348 journals), some higher than $1 per page. 

That’s three ways we pay for the same research, writing, proofreading, and peer review. Even Harvard has found the cost too high, and has cut down on its subscriptions. …

Students can make several big contributions to this movement. Members of Congress need to hear from their constituents in support of the Federal Research Public Access Act (FRPAA), a bipartisan bill to make taxpayer-funded published research—most scientific work in the U.S.—freely available. Students can explain to their professors why they should publish in open access journals when available, and better yet why the University should establish a freely-available repository for all Harvard researchers’ work. Best of all, seniors can set an example now by making their theses available to the world at www.hcs.harvard.edu/thesis. Each of us can show politicians, faculty members, and present and future colleagues that we value open access to academic research. It’s up to us to say it: Knowledge is for everyone. …”

Harvard College Thesis Repository [now offline]

Welcome to the Harvard College Thesis Repository, a project of Harvard College Free Culture! Here Harvard students make their senior theses accessible to the world, for the advancement of scholarship and the widening of open access to academic research. Too many academics still permit publishers to restrict access to their work, needlessly limiting—cutting in half, or worse—readership, research impact, and research productivity. For more background, check out our op-ed article in The Harvard Crimson. If you’ve written a thesis in Harvard College, you’re invited to take a step toward open access right here, by uploading your thesis for the world to read. (If you’re heading for an academic career, this can even be a purely selfish move—a first taste of the greater readership and greater impact that comes with open access.)

Theses For All | Opinion | The Harvard Crimson

“The creation of a website [Harvard College Thesis Repository] to save all senior theses —created by Harvard College Free Culture, a student group— should be welcomed as a great addition to the campus and Harvard’s ever-widening and expanding academic community. Currently, the Harvard University Archives only saves certain theses depending on the honors grade that they receive, and theses that receive the cutoff grade and above are accessible through the Archives’ inconvenient closed-stack system. 

The Free Thesis Project provides researchers much easier access to all of Harvard’s senior theses, if students choose to put them on the site….”

SPARC has started a list of big-deal cancellations. https://sparcopen.org/ou…

“SPARC has started a list of big-deal cancellations. 

https://sparcopen.org/our-work/big-deal-cancellation-tracking/

It’s a great idea. If the list doesn’t include any big-deal cancellations at your institution, let SPARC know. See the update buttons at the bottom of the page. 

At launch time the list didn’t include Harvard’s 2003 cancellation of the Elsevier big deal, and I just sent SPARC some relevant links. As long as I’m doing that, I thought I’d blog them here as well. After the official announcement by Sidney Verba, I list the pieces in chronological order:

“A Letter from Sidney Verba,” (then Harvard’s University Librarian), Harvard University Library, December 9, 2003.

http://web.archive.org/web/20040217152422/hul.harvard.edu/letter040101.html

“Harvard is Pursuing its Own Elsevier Deal,” Library Journal, October 21, 2003.

http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2003/10/ljarchives/harvard-is-pursuing-its-own-elsevier-deal/

Jeffrey C. Aguero, “Libraries to Cut Academic Journals,” Harvard Crimson, November 23, 2003.

http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2003/11/24/libraries-to-cut-academic-journals-citing/

“Libraries take a stand: Journals present rising costs to libraries – and to scholarship,” Harvard Gazette, February 5, 2004. 

https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2004/02/libraries-take-a-stand/ …”

Libraries to Cut Academic Journals | News | The Harvard Crimson

“The University Library is currently in negotiations with its largest supplier of academic journals, publishing magnate Reed Elsevier, hoping to secure a less restrictive contract.

Currently, Harvard and Reed Elsevier have a three-year contact, covering almost 800 journals, which is set to expire at the end of this year. According to library officials, the contract is very limiting in regards to changing and canceling subscriptions to certain journals….“They make it difficult to cancel and we get locked into buying. We want to sign a shorter term contract with more flexibility,” said [Sidney] Verba [University Librarian]….”

 

Harvard is Pursuing its Own Elsevier Deal

“In a move that reflects the extent of academic librarians’ concerns with the inflexibility of so-called “big deal” e-journal packages, Harvard University likely will not sign a multi-year contract to renew access to Elsevier’s journals. Harvard University Library Director Sidney Verba said, “We haven’t finished negotiating, but in all likelihood we will not be signing the renewal offer through NERL, in the way in which they have put it forward.” NERL, the Northeast Research Library consortium, includes 21 research libraries, Harvard among them. Verba said the sticking points were the inflexible “bundling” of journals in the previous contract and the inability to cancel journal titles without incurring heavy penalties. In “big deal” packages, libraries are contractually locked in to subscriptions for extended periods, regardless of usage and changing budget situations, in exchange for deep discounts and caps on inflation. “The main point is the ability of libraries to control their own collections,” explained Verba, “to cancel what they want to cancel, to have the option of attrition, especially in times of real financial stress, like now. The Elsevier contract does not really allow that.” Harvard spends six percent of its materials budget on Elsevier–about four times more than on its second highest collection expense….”

Libraries take a stand | Harvard Gazette

“Students and faculty logging onto the HOLLIS catalog after winter break found a decrease in the number of periodicals available from Elsevier, one of the world’s largest publishers of scientific journals. According to Sidney Verba, Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor and director of the University Library, the decision to eliminate these journals was the result of 15 months of careful consideration. “It was driven not only by current financial realities,” Verba states, “but also – and perhaps more importantly – by the need to reassert control over our collections and to encourage new models for research publication at Harvard.” Similar steps have been taken at other major research institutions, including Cornell, Johns Hopkins, and the Triangle Research Libraries Network….”