Opportunity: Lumen Employee Fellow | Berkman Klein Center

“The Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University seeks an extraordinary full-time, salaried employee fellow to join the Center’s Lumen project.  The fellowship provides the opportunity to develop substantive and scholarly work on the global takedown and intermediary liability landscape, especially as it relates to the major challenges of the current moment.

Lumen is a research project collecting and studying requests and demands of all kinds –both legitimate and questionable– to remove material from online, including copyright takedown notices, government requests and court orders.  The project’s goals are to encourage and facilitate both research and transparency about the different kinds of complaints and requests for removal that are being sent to Internet publishers and service providers, and to provide as much information as possible about such notices — of which Lumen’s database contains over twelve million, referencing the removal of approximately 4.5 billion URLs —  in terms of who is sending them and why, and to what effect.”

OpenDP Hiring Scientific Staff | OpenDP

“The OpenDP project seeks to hire 1-2 scientists to work with faculty directors Gary King and Salil Vadhan and the OpenDP Community to formulate and advance the scientific goals of OpenDP and solve research problems that are needed for its success. Candidates should have a graduate-level degree (preferably a PhD), familiarity with differential privacy, and one or both of the following: 

Experience with implementing software for data science, privacy, and/or security, and an interest in working with software engineers to develop the OpenDP codebase.
Experience with applied statistics, and an interest in working with domain scientists to apply OpenDP software to data-sharing problems in their field. In particular, we are looking for a researcher to engage on an immediate project on Covid-19 and mobility and epidemiology.  See HDSI Fellow for more details….”

Harvard Library Bulletin now open access through DASH

“Harvard Library Bulletin is Harvard Library’s flagship scholarly journal. In print since 1947, and published by Houghton Library since 2001, HLB is a cross-disciplinary publication whose articles focus on Harvard Library collections. On August 1, the entire print run of HLB —nearly 1,800 assets  in all— was made available for free online reading and download on DASH, Harvard University’s open-access repository. As of August 24, there have been over 35,000 page views and 6,600 article downloads. The deposits represent one phase of a multi-year project to convert HLB from a paid subscription print model to a fully open access and online publication that will launch in fall 2020 (more news soon to come)….”

Library Unveils Set of Organizational Values to Guide Current and Future Planning | Harvard Library

“Values

Lead with Curiosity. We expand intellectual frontiers and remain in awe of what we do not yet know.
Seek Collaboration. We bring people and ideas together from within and beyond because we believe partnership creates more interesting results.
Embrace Diverse Perspectives. We cultivate and celebrate diversity in our collections and our community to construct a more inclusive and just world.
Champion Access. We enhance access to information and advance inclusive models of scholarly communication.
Aim for the Extraordinary. We drive progress and deliver the unexpected, building on our past and forging the future….”

Documentary Archaeology of Late Medieval Europe (DALME)

“The DALME project and team are based in the Department of History at Harvard University with collaborations extending across North America and Europe. Working in the interests of documentary archaeology, we transcribe and publish archival documents that identify ordinary household objects, tools, equipment, commodities, and other elements of material culture. Team members and collaborators include archaeologists, art historians, historians, and literary scholars. We are eager to extend our collaborations with all scholars interested in the material culture of late medieval Europe; please reach out to us.

Our work is currently sorted into two major research initiatives or documentary corpora. Households and Things in Medieval Europe features household or estate inventories from a number of regions of Europe. The Object as Commodity presents information relative to object values and the role that objects can serve as commodities or economic goods. Within each corpus, members of the DALME team and project associates have created individual collections defined either by geography or theme.

The existing collections include records in Latin and a number of vernaculars. These collections are fully searchable in their original languages; our Search page offers suggestions on how to search, filter, or browse the collection.”

Documentary Archaeology of Late Medieval Europe (DALME)

“The DALME project and team are based in the Department of History at Harvard University with collaborations extending across North America and Europe. Working in the interests of documentary archaeology, we transcribe and publish archival documents that identify ordinary household objects, tools, equipment, commodities, and other elements of material culture. Team members and collaborators include archaeologists, art historians, historians, and literary scholars. We are eager to extend our collaborations with all scholars interested in the material culture of late medieval Europe; please reach out to us.

Our work is currently sorted into two major research initiatives or documentary corpora. Households and Things in Medieval Europe features household or estate inventories from a number of regions of Europe. The Object as Commodity presents information relative to object values and the role that objects can serve as commodities or economic goods. Within each corpus, members of the DALME team and project associates have created individual collections defined either by geography or theme.

The existing collections include records in Latin and a number of vernaculars. These collections are fully searchable in their original languages; our Search page offers suggestions on how to search, filter, or browse the collection.”

Crafting a High-Def Human Tissue Atlas | Department of Biomedical Informatics

“HuBMAP (the Human BioMolecular Atlas Program) has released its inaugural data for use by the scientific community and the general public. Included in this release are detailed, 3D anatomical data and genetic sequences of healthy tissues from seven organ types, at the level of individual cells as well as many bulk tissue datasets. HuBMAP’s ultimate goal is to provide the framework required for scientists to create a 3D atlas of the human body.

HuBMAP’s tools and maps are openly available for research to accelerate understanding of the relationships between cell and tissue organization and function, as well as human health. Visitors can find the data at portal.hubmapconsortium.org.

HuBMAP is a consortium of 18 diverse collaborative research teams across the United States and Europe. HuBMAP values secure, open sharing and collaboration with other consortia and the wider research community. The consortium  is managed by a trans-National Institutes of Health (NIH) working group of staff from the NIH Common Fund; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering; and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases….”

Ars Inveniendi Analytica | Published by Ars Inveniendi Analytica

“we believe that the mathematical community could and should engage into the creation of a line of arXiv overlay journals, covering the various areas of Mathematics, and publishing papers of the highest quality. We are thus launching, with the support of a group of colleagues who have accepted our invitation to serve as editors, an arXiv overlay journal in Mathematical Analysis, called Ars Inveniendi Analytica. This journal will benefit from the financial support of the University of Texas Libraries, and has been assisted in these initial stages by the Harvard Library, a member of the Confederation of Open Access Repositories….”

Open Online Education Project

“The Open Online Education Project (OOEP) aims to improve online education by:

Developing open-source online educational tools.
Advocating for the publishing of free online education materials
Creating collaborations between institutions to address problems in online education.
Collecting and distributing resources for online education

We are a group of students, faculty, and technologists, growing out of Harvard and MIT, working on online education at the university level. We believe online education naturally lends itself to collaboration and needs further development. OOEP consists of a coalition of projects and partners….”

A brief history of open access at Harvard · Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communication

“This is the first of two related posts. The second will describe our current thinking about open access. (Watch for it around Open Access Week, 2020.) We’re looking forward and want to start by showing where we’ve come from. 

For now, this brief history focuses mostly on Harvard’s thinking about subscription journal prices and Harvard’s open access (OA) policies. There are many other OA initiatives at Harvard we might add later, for example on courseware, data, digitization, open-source software, and publishing, as well as our partnerships with larger, multi-institutional initiatives. …”