DataTags

“There are many worthy purposes for sharing data widely. In research, data sharing enables replication and validation of scientific findings and maximizes return on research investment, so it is not surprising that sponsors and publishers expect or mandate the sharing of data where possible. In organizations, data sharing leads to insights on operations and opportunities to improve goods and services. However, data containing sensitive information about individuals or personal data collected under various agreements cannot be shared openly without appropriate safeguards. An extensive body of statutes, regulations, institutional policies, consent forms, data sharing agreements, and common practices govern how sensitive data should be used and disclosed in different contexts. Researchers, institutions and companies that manage and share data must interpret how the various legal requirements and other data privacy and security standards apply to their handling of a given dataset.

DataTags helps data holders navigate these complex issues….”

Clinic Files Law Scholar Briefs, Supporting Public.Resource.Org | Cyberlaw Clinic

“On Friday, November 22, 2019, the Cyberlaw Clinic and local counsel Marcia Hofmann filed amicus briefs in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia in two related cases, ASTM v. Public.Resource.Org (.pdf), and AERA v. Public.Resource.Org (.pdf). The cases involve copyright infringement claims brought by standards development organizations (SDOs) against Public.Resource.org. The cases are back before the United States District Court for the District of Columbia on remand from the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. The core issue in front of the Court is whether PRO’s provision of free online access to codes that were developed by the plaintiffs — but incorporated by reference into binding law — constitutes fair use….”

Developing an Open Access, Competency-Based Global Oral Health Curriculum: A Global Health Starter Kit | Journal of Dental Education

Abstract:  Dental education has seen increases in global health and international educational experiences in many dental schools’ curricula. In response, the Consortium of Universities for Global Health’s Global Oral Health Interest Group aims to develop readily available, open access resources for competency-based global oral health teaching and learning. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a Global Health Starter Kit (GHSK), an interdisciplinary, competency-based, open access curriculum for dental faculty members who wish to teach global oral health in their courses. Phase I (2012-17) evaluated longitudinal outcomes from two Harvard School of Dental Medicine pilot global health courses with 32 advanced and 34 predoctoral dental students. In Phase II (2018), the Phase I outcomes informed development, implementation, and evaluation of the open access GHSK (45 enrollees) written by an interdisciplinary, international team of 13 content experts and consisting of five modules: Global Trends, Global Goals, Back to Basics: Primary Care, Social Determinants and Risks, and Ethics and Sustainability. In Phase III (summer and fall 2018), five additional pilot institutions (two U.S. dental schools, one U.S. dental hygiene program, and two dental schools in low- and middle-income countries) participated in an early adoption of the GHSK curriculum. The increase in perceived knowledge scores of students enrolled in the pilot global health courses was similar to those enrolled in the GHSK, suggesting the kit educated students as well or better in nearly all categories than prior course materials. This study found the GHSK led to improvements in learning in the short term and may also contribute to long-term career planning and decision making by providing competency-based global health education.

Illuminating the Flows – and Redactions – of Content Online | Berkman Klein Center

“The staff of Lumen, a unique public resource at Harvard University collecting and studying millions of removal requests for online content, is thrilled to announce that the project has received a $1.5 million grant from Arcadia, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin, to expand and improve its database and research efforts.

From well-publicized takedowns from foreign governments, political campaigns and celebrities to more obscure requests from private entities and individuals, modern online platforms and search engines must regularly respond to requests and demands to remove content and links. Lumen provides a way for the public and its representatives – including academic researchers, journalists, and other stakeholders – to understand trends in demands for content removal and their outcomes in ways that balance public disclosure and privacy rights and serve the greater public interest….”

3D printing revives skeletal study program at Countway – Harvard Gazette

“Now, staff members at the Medical School’s Countway Library are reviving the initiative with a 21st-century twist. They’re planning to assemble new boxes of replica human bones and skulls rendered through 3D printing in a program they’re calling Beyond the Bone Box….

The library houses an anatomical museum, which is expected to preserve rare anatomical specimens in perpetuity, but as part of the library system, it also has an educational mission. Creating 3D models of rare specimens allows the museum to safeguard the originals while still allowing Countway’s special collections to be used as teaching tools….

“A bone box is mostly about access,” Hall said. “With a collection that has human remains in it … education is critical to your existence. Otherwise this is just a strange horde that you never share, and ethically that’s irresponsible.” …”

ASECS at 50: Interview with Robert Darnton

“Of the potential solutions, open research practices are among the most promising. The argument is that transparency acts as an implicit quality control process. If others are able to scrutinise our work—not just the final published output, but the underlying data, code, and so on—researchers will be incentivised to ensure these are high quality.

So, if we think that research could benefit from improved quality control, and if we think that open research might have a role to play in this, why aren’t we all doing it? In a word: incentives….”

OpenSDP | Strategic Data Project

“Harvard’s Strategic Data Project works with education agencies to find and train data leaders to uncover trends, measure solutions, and effectively communicate evidence to stakeholders. Our inspiring network of system leaders, fellows, and faculty come together to share how to best use data to make a difference in the lives of students….

The Strategic Data Project is a diverse, passionate community of education leaders, data strategists, and faculty committed to using data to help all students succeed. Together, we are driving data-informed change in over 125 school systems and organizations….

Since 2008, SDP has partnered with school districts, charter networks, state agencies, and nonprofit organizations across the country and around the world to bring high-quality research methods and data analysis to bear on education management and policy decisions.

An initiative of the Center for Education Policy Research (CEPR) at Harvard University, SDP was formed on three fundamental premises: 

1) Policy and management decisions can directly influence schools’ and teachers’ ability to improve student achievement.

2) Valid and reliable data analysis significantly improves the quality of decision making.

3) Building an agency’s internal capacity to conduct rigorous data analysis is critical to producing and sustaining evidence-driven decisions….

OpenSDP is an online, shared community of analytic code, tools, and trainings to foster collaboration among education analysts and researchers. Housed on GitHub, users have access to code and tutorials for every stage of the analytic cycle, from preparing and standardizing user data to conducting analyses and producing visualizations. …”

MIT Press and Harvard Data Science Initiative launch the Harvard Data Science Review | MIT News

“The MIT Press and the Harvard Data Science Initiative (HDSI) have announced the launch of the Harvard Data Science Review (HDSR). The open-access journal, published by MIT Press and hosted online via the multimedia platform PubPub, an initiative of the MIT Knowledge Futures group, will feature leading global thinkers in the burgeoning field of data science, making research, educational resources, and commentary accessible to academics, professionals, and the interested public. With demand for data scientists booming, HDSR will provide a centralized, authoritative, and peer-reviewed publishing community to service the growing profession….”

Harvard and MIT team up to launch peer-reviewed data science journal | News | Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

“The Harvard Data Science Initiative and MIT Press have launched the Harvard Data Science Review (HDSR), an open-access peer-reviewed journal that serves as a centralized and authoritative outlet for the burgeoning field of data science.

The journal will feature expert overviews of complex ideas and topics from leading thinkers with direct applications for teaching, research, business, government, and more, according to a July 15, 2019 MIT Press article….”

Het Harvard Open Access-licentiemodel in het Nederlands recht

From Google’s English: “Many US universities can publish scientific articles directly open access. They makeuse the Harvard open access licensing model for this. This article examines whether the Harvardlicensing model under Dutch law is permitted. That appears to be the case. That makes it for authors and institutions in the Netherlands very easy to meet the open access requirements of grant providers,as recently formulated in Plan S.”