Harvard researchers to help develop cloud-based NIH Data Commons platform – Harvard Gazette

“The National Institute of Health has announced that Harvard co-Principal Investigators Dr. Mercè Crosas and Dr. Timothy Clark are NIH Data Commons Pilot Phase Awardees….

The awards are part of the National Institutes of Health’s new Data Commons program, which will be implemented in a 4-year pilot phase to explore the feasibility and best practices for making digital objects including very large-scale genomics resources, available and computable through collaborative platforms. This will be done on public clouds, virtual spaces where service providers make resources, such as applications and storage, available over the internet. The goal of the NIH Data Commons Pilot Phase is to accelerate biomedical discoveries by making biomedical research data Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable (FAIR) for more researchers….”

DASCH Project | Astronomical Photographic Plate Collection

“Digital Access to a Sky Century @ Harvard (DASCH) is a unique project that aims to scan the majority of the Astronomical Photographic Plate Collection’s 500,000 glass plate negatives and produce full photometry results for the entire sky. The DASCH project is uniquely designed for Time Domain Astronomy/Astrophysics, which is one of the most prioritized fields of study in astrophysics today. The stars photographed on glass plates between 1880s-1990s operate as time capsules, allowing astronomers to study how the sky has changed over one hundred years….”

On Open Access, Academic Freedom, and Science Policy — A Reply to Suber | jbrittholbrook

“I have argued that Plan S, if we were to take the 10 principles as currently written as policy, would impinge on academic freedom. It’s interesting who dismisses this claim out of hand and who actually responds to my argument, even if they disagree with me. I think Peter Suber is a member of the latter camp….”

EU open-access envoy urges foundations to join Plan S

“Organisations such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Wellcome Trust should join Plan S to continue their “moral leadership” on open research, Plan S founder and European Commission open-access envoy Robert-Jan Smits told Research Europe. He was speaking on his return from a weeklong tour of federal agencies, universities and learned societies in the United States, where he was attempting to boost international support for the plan….

Smits claimed that the feedback on Plan S he received in the US was mostly that independent foundations need to join….

Smits has said that Plan S is based on the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s policies. These include that papers reporting research it has funded must be made openly available immediately and with a licence that permits unrestricted reuse. The foundation has forced some of the world’s most prestigious journals to change their policies so that they comply.

During the trip, Smits sought to quell fears that Plan S would undermine the so-called green open-access model, in which papers are placed in repositories, usually after a publisher-imposed embargo period. Plan S will not accept embargo periods, causing some concern that it will only support the gold open-access model in which papers are made openly available immediately, usually by paying publishers an article-processing charge.

Smits said that Plan S leaves “ample room” for repositories, article preprints and self-archiving. He also admitted that organisations in the US flagged the plan’s lack of recognition for publishers using the so-called diamond and platinum open-access models, which do not charge authors publication fees….

According to Smits, those he met who were most enthusiastic about Plan S were librarians and researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University.

More cautiously interested parties, he said, were the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy, the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation. Smits said this was because the OSTP is awaiting a new director who will set the agenda for open access at the federal level. Research Europe has approached these organisations for comment.

Those who were most sceptical of the plan were the learned societies, Smits said. These organisations rely on income from journal subscription charges and fear that the loss of revenue caused by a switch to open access would affect activities such as the organisation of conferences, he said….”

Individual Open Access Licence | Harvard OSC

“…by signing this license, I hereby grant to Harvard University the same non-exclusive rights that faculty grant to Harvard under the faculty open-access (OA) policies. More specifically, I grant to Harvard University a non-exclusive, irrevocable, worldwide license to exercise any and all rights under copyright relating to each of my scholarly articles, in any medium, provided that the articles are not sold for a profit, and to authorize others to do the same. …”

Open Access Policies | Harvard OSC

“In 2008, Harvard’s Faculty of Arts & Sciences voted unanimously to give the Harvard a nonexclusive, irrevocable right to distribute their scholarly articles for any non-commercial purpose. In the years since, the remaining eight Harvard schools voted similar open-access (OA) policies; as of September 2017, four research centers have joined their number….”

WorldMap

Harvard WorldMap is an online, open source mapping platform developed to lower barriers for scholars who wish to explore, visualize, edit, and publish geospatial information.  The system attempts to address the gap between desktop GIS which is generally light on collaboration, and web-based mapping systems which often don’t support the inclusion of large datasets….

WorldMap is being developed by the Center for Geographic Analysis at Harvard University….”

Harvard upgrades DASH DSpace repository | Atmire

Harvard just upgraded its DSpace repository, DASH (Digital Access to Scholarship at Harvard). 

Quoting Peter Suber, director of the Harvard Office for Scholarly Communication: “We’re very happy with the upgrade to DASH. For nine years we’d been using an early version of DSpace, heavily customized for our needs. It gave us exactly what we wanted and worked beautifully. But the constant tweaking took its toll. The upgrade embraces all our major customizations, reduces our maintenance load, makes it easier for new developers to join the project, and adds features we couldn’t easily have added on our own.”

MIT and Harvard: When Elite Institutions Hack & Open Knowledge – #Coworkers #Makers #Hackers #Futureofwork

“Between the 25th and the 28th of July 2018, we co-created a very rich learning expedition organized by the Research Group on Collaborative Spaces (RGCS), at MIT and Harvard University, in Cambridge (MA). This alternative academic network focuses on topics about new work practices inspired by open science and citizen science cultures.”