Community of Practice – OA2020 US Working Group and Community of Practice

“The OA2020 Community of Practice was established to expand the shared knowledge and implementation of OA (open access) and transformative agreement principles and mechanisms.

The number of new open access and transformative agreements is rapidly growing, yet an understanding of how they work is far from universal.  Mutual exchanges of ideas, tactics, and a deeper knowledge of the current and potential models will foster opportunities for open access publishing on a larger scale. 

Experienced OA and transformative agreement pioneers share their experiences and approaches and collaboratively address emerging issues and models. Collectively, the Community discusses such topics as the importance of data analysis in agreements, faculty and institutional buy-in, and the impact of shifting funding models and workflows into open access….”

LIBER Webinar: How can libraries help keep Open Science infrastructure free and independent? | Zenodo

While OS infrastructure has been generously funded for years, without more funding, essential services that many of us depend upon are at risk of service degradation, reduced availability and of survival in some cases. Furthermore, much of the infrastructure run by not for-profits is currently free to libraries. However, how long this free service will last unknown since some commercial publishers are diversifying portfolios. An uncomfortable truth is that budgets are now even more strained, and operational and development costs remain in the absence of mid- or long-term funding solutions. OS not-for-profit infrastructure is appealing to academic library directors due to limited financial support. It is crucial that library directors take a leading role in continuing to provide financial support for OS infrastructure, even in such challenging times.

Libraries across the world have raised over 2.9 million euros over several years for OS infrastructure, supporting DOAJ, Sherpa Romeo, DOAB, OAPEN, PKP and OpenCitations. However, some of these infrastructures are still far from reaching their targets. A few thousand euros can go a long way. This webinar brings together voices from the library community who have committed to funding OS infrastructure from all regions of Europe. They offer their own perspectives on why funding remains so important to them and their organisations. Attendees learned:

About the current SCOSS infrastructures who seek funding,
How institutions and library consortia are financially supporting OS infrastructure,
Arguments for justifying financial support for OS within your own institution.

This webinar is jointly organised by LIBER and SPARC Europe within the framework of SCOSS – Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services, which aims to improve the financial position, enhance resilience, and better ensure OS infrastructure sustainability. Speakers represent OS infrastructures, library directors and consortia who have funded OS infrastructure from different regions of Europe.

Five recommendations for “FAIR software” | Zenodo

“Our Accelerate Open Science Project aims to give context to various developments in the area of Open Science, and to make information about topics such as FAIR data easier accessible.

These slides are an adjusted version of the content from the https://fair-software.eu/ website, which is a collaboration between the Netherlands eScience Center and DANS….”

Rethink and reassess the role of community in post-pandemic open scie…

“In this OAWeek 2020 we share three of our main concerns from a developing region perspective ?Underfunding of community-owned infrastructures because scarce funds directed to APCs ?Researchers rewarded only when publishing in “mainstream” journals with “prestige industry” indicators, making invisible other contributions ?Weak international dialogue, cooperation and interoperability among community-owned infrastructures…”

Rethink and reassess the role of community in post-pandemic open scie…

“In this OAWeek 2020 we share three of our main concerns from a developing region perspective ?Underfunding of community-owned infrastructures because scarce funds directed to APCs ?Researchers rewarded only when publishing in “mainstream” journals with “prestige industry” indicators, making invisible other contributions ?Weak international dialogue, cooperation and interoperability among community-owned infrastructures…”

Get Full Text Research: Partner Media Kit October 2020

“Get Full Text Research (GetFTR) is a new solution that enables faster access for researchers to the published journal articles they need. It is free to use for the research community, libraries, and integrators and operates on a tiered pricing structure for publishers. Built on trusted technology to work on and off-campus, GetFTR integrates with online research services and discovery platforms to provide direct, authenticated links to the most up to date and best version of the journal article, both on- and off-campus. More detail and FAQs are available here: www.getfulltextresearch.com….”

Slide deck highlighting answers to five questions about FAIR data – Accelerate Open Science

“Our Accelerate Open Science Project aims to give context to various developments in the area of Open Science, and to make information about topics such as FAIR data easier accessible. As a second slide deck in our Info Slides Series, we present you Answers to five questions about FAIR data.

The slide deck is licensed under a CC-BY license, which enables you to make use of it any way you want. You can find the slides here….”